Academics

Course Descriptions

Summerland Honors Program course offerings

HON 101. In Search of Ourselves. (4)
Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Summerland Honors Program or instructor approval.
This semester is a historically based immersion in literary, philosophical, religious and artistic expressions of various aspects of human identity (e.g., human nature, love, alienation).  Participating faculty will provide an orientation to particular disciplines involved in this semester‘s study. Specific themes may vary from year to year.  Each student will be expected to engage in service learning as part of course requirements.  This service is coordinated by the campus Values Based Learning Program.  Honors 101 and 102 satisfy Core Curriculum requirements for Humanities/Fine Arts, Areas C-1, C-2, and C-3.  Offered fall semester.
 
HON 102. Images of the Human Soul. (4)
Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Summerland Honors Program or instructor approval.
Building upon the study of the first semester, this course analyzes issues of human identity in today‘s world (e.g., human rights, postmodernism, morality).  This semester will also provide a synthesis of various disciplines involved in the study. Themes may vary from year to year.  Each student will be expected to engage in service learning as part of course requirements. This service is coordinated by the campus Values Based Learning Program.  Honors 101 and 102 satisfy Core Curriculum requirements for Humanities/Fine Arts, Areas C-1, C-2, and C-3.  Offered spring semester.
 
HON 201. Looking Through a Lens and Living in Harmony with Nature. (4)
Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Summerland Honors Program or instructor approval.
An examination of the scientific approach to understanding and predicting the natural world and essence of humanity.  What is the Scientific Method, how did it emerge, and in what way(s) has science produced and also been produced by the human community?  The sub-disciplines of biology, chemistry, environmental science, and physics will be explored, details of which may vary from year to year.  The laboratory component will emphasize use of the scientific method to investigate natural phenomena.  Community Service is an integral component of this course. Honors 201 and 202 satisfy Core Curriculum requirements in Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Area D-1 and D-3.  Offered fall semester.
 
HON 202. Science, Technology and Values, A Closer Look at Today and the Future. (4)
Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Summerland Honors Program or instructor approval.
Building upon the previous semester‘s study, students will confront one or several contemporary issues in science (e.g., natural disasters and society, genetic engineering, preserving the rain forest, can science solve every problem?). What is the place of science in the human community, and in what ways does science reveal and define nature?  The laboratory component will be used specifically to investigate problems in our world and how the scientific method can be used to investigate possible solutions.  Community Service is an integral component of this course.  Honors 201 and 202 satisfy Core Curriculum requirements in Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Area D-1 and D-3.  Offered spring semester.
 
HON 301. A Not So Distant Mirror: The Past as Prologue. (4)
Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Summerland Honors Program or instructor approval.
This course explores the origins and evolution of human communities using the methods and studies of social scientists. Study will be focused around broad themes that may vary from year to year (e.g., the individual in community, the social contract, cooperation and conflict).  Students will engage in programs of service to those in need in local communities.  Students will choose programs according to their interests and available opportunities.  Honors 301 and 302 satisfy Core Curriculum requirements in History and Social Sciences, Areas E-1 and E-2.  Offered fall semester.
 
HON 302. Our Many Faces: Facing the Music. (4)
Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Summerland Honors Program or instructor approval.
This course continues the quest for identity by examining communities of the 20th century. As we shape our future in all arenas (e.g., social, economic, political, religious), what questions must we ask, what values must we act upon, what road must we take? As well, what are the possibilities for the future based on our study of the continuities and changes evident in the human story? Particular themes may vary from year to year.  Students will engage in programs of service to those in need in local communities. Students will choose programs according to their interests and available opportunities.  Honors 301 and 302 satisfy Core Curriculum requirements in History and Social Sciences, Areas E-1 and E-2.  Offered spring semester.
 
HON 401. The Human Character: Pulling It All Together. (1)
Prerequisites or co-requisites: five of the six honors courses.
The capstone experience is structured around a one hour seminar that provides an opportunity for individual and collective reflection on the preceding three year experience. Above all, this is to be a time for reflection, for perhaps considering a portfolio and for revisiting any especially meaningful experiences. In short, it is to be a time for pulling it all together.  Offered fall semester.

Course Descriptions