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Head Men’s and Women’s Track & Field and Cross Country Coach

Qualified Applicants

Qualified applicants must submit information requested in the job posting. Unless otherwise specified, review of applicants will continue until positions are filled.

Head Men’s and Women’s Track & Field and Cross Country Coach

Newberry College (member the South Atlantic Conference and NCAA Division 2), located in Newberry, SC seeks a Head Coach for our Men’s and Women’s Track & Field and Cross Country programs. This position will be responsible for all aspects of the Track & Field and Cross Country programs, including recruiting, training, and mentoring student-athletes. A strong, well-rounded knowledge of a successful Track and Field Program and previous coaching / recruiting experience at the collegiate level is required.

 

Candidates must have strong organizational and communication skills, be highly-motivated and attentive to details, have the ability to lead and work independently as well as within a team environment, and the ability to provide effective leadership to student-athletes to encourage both successful academic development and competitive performance.

 

Bachelor’s degree required; Master’s Degree with a minimum of 3 years of collegiate coaching preferred. This is a full-time, 12 month position). Salary is commensurate with experience and qualifications.

 

Review of applications will begin immediately and will remain open until a candidate is selected. To apply, please send cover letter, CV and complete contact information for three (3) professional references to hr@newberry.edu. Please put “Track and Field Coach” in the subject line. The successful candidate will be subject to a criminal background check.

Policy

These job descriptions reflect the general details considered necessary to describe the principal functions of the job identified and shall not necessarily be construed as a detailed description of all work requirements that may be inherent in the job. Job descriptions do not constitute an employment agreement or contract of employment, expressed or implied. Unless designated in writing and signed by the College President, all College employees are considered to be EMPLOYED AT WILL. Newberry College reserves the right to change, alter and amend job descriptions, functions and duties at the pleasure of the College President or Board of Trustees.

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Human Resources Generalist

Qualified Applicants

Qualified applicants must submit information requested in the job posting. Unless otherwise specified, review of applicants will continue until positions are filled.

Human Resources Generalist

POSITION SUMMARY:  

Assists in running the daily functions of the Human Resource (HR) department including hiring and interviewing staff, on-boarding, administering pay, benefits, and leave, off-boarding, and enforcing company policies and practices.                                                 

 

QUALIFICATIONS/REQUIREMENTS:

Bachelors degree in Human Resources, Business Administration, or related field required.
At least one year of human resource management experience preferred.

 

Please send resume to hr@newberry.edu and put HR Generalist in the subject line.

Policy

These job descriptions reflect the general details considered necessary to describe the principal functions of the job identified and shall not necessarily be construed as a detailed description of all work requirements that may be inherent in the job. Job descriptions do not constitute an employment agreement or contract of employment, expressed or implied. Unless designated in writing and signed by the College President, all College employees are considered to be EMPLOYED AT WILL. Newberry College reserves the right to change, alter and amend job descriptions, functions and duties at the pleasure of the College President or Board of Trustees.

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Accountant

Qualified Applicants

Qualified applicants must submit information requested in the job posting. Unless otherwise specified, review of applicants will continue until positions are filled.

Accountant

Job Description:

Reports directly to the Vice President for Administrative Services/CFO and serves as an integral part of the College’s Administrative Affairs division in supporting the CFO and the Director of Financial reporting in carrying out the responsibilities of the division. The Staff accountant is responsible for monthly reconciliations of bank accounts and/or general ledger accounts, posting journal entries, and compiling financial information for various compliance reports and required surveys.  The position is further responsible for uploading donation/gift information into the general ledger and for reconciling the accounts with the Advancement Office. The position participates in the annual budget process, reviews ACH and other electronic payment transactions daily, and provides endowment accounting and maintenance of the endowment software.  The Staff accountant also maintains the fixed asset spreadsheet, provides oversight for all grant accounting and assists with the annual audit preparation. The Staff Accountant assists in the month-end and fiscal year-end closing process and performs monthly, quarterly and annual financial Aid billing reconciliations.

 

Qualifications:  

Associate’s degree in accounting, Bachelor’s degree and, CPA/ CPA candidate preferred.  Three years of accounting experience with proven knowledge of accounting entries and reconciliations, demonstrated knowledge of GAAP (FASB) and not for profit accounting.  Experience in Higher Education, and Jenzabar preferred.

 

Additional Qualifications: Ability to work with complex automated systems;  good oral and written communication skills; strong analytical skills; strong organizational skills with the ability to manage multiple tasks and perform detailed work; Ability to work well with a diverse group of individuals; Ability to establish and document adequate internal controls.

 

Salary/Compensation:  Competitive

 

Electronic resume materials may be emailed to hr@newberry.edu.  Please include “Accountant" in the subject line.

Policy

These job descriptions reflect the general details considered necessary to describe the principal functions of the job identified and shall not necessarily be construed as a detailed description of all work requirements that may be inherent in the job. Job descriptions do not constitute an employment agreement or contract of employment, expressed or implied. Unless designated in writing and signed by the College President, all College employees are considered to be EMPLOYED AT WILL. Newberry College reserves the right to change, alter and amend job descriptions, functions and duties at the pleasure of the College President or Board of Trustees.

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FAQs for Prospective Students and Families Amid COVID-19

We're here to help.

Though access to campus is limited amid the spread of COVID-19, the offices of Admission and Financial Aid are working to help welcome the next class of Newberry Wolves.

 

If you still have unanswered questions, our staff is available to assist you over the phone and via email. If your call is not answered right away,  leave a detailed voicemail with your name, your student’s name, and your phone number, and we will follow up with you.

For Prospective Students and Parents

Q: Is Newberry College still accepting applications?

A: Yes, absolutely. The Office of Admission is still actively reviewing applications for admission for summer and fall 2020. You can submit your application online here or with the Common App.

 

Q: I am unable to take or retake the ACT or SAT exams due to cancellations. What would you suggest?

A: For the remainder of the fall 2020 admission cycle, Newberry College will offer test-optional admission. If you are unable to provide an ACT or SAT score, or if your scores are lower than a 17 ACT combined / 910 SAT combined, you can provide a personal statement of 300 words or more to complete the application. Please send your personal statement to admission@newberry.edu.

 

Q: Will I still be allowed to visit campus?

A: For now, we are only allowing individual visits. Please note that we are currently unable to provide meetings with faculty and athletic staff. We encourage you to reschedule your visit when our programs resume or schedule an online appointment, offered daily, with your student’s admission counselor. Your student will receive information about this via email. Future visits and visit days will be determined as the situation unfolds.

 

Q: Is Newberry College still hosting events?

A: No. All structured student and campus activities, including all athletic events and summer camps, have been canceled though July 1.

For Accepted Students and Parents

Q: Will this affect the timing of the admission process?

A: The Office of Admission is still actively reviewing applications for admission in summer and fall 2020, and electronic decision notifications will continue to be sent via email and text. Printed letters may be delayed, but permissions in Wolf Den will allow admitted students to take the next steps, even if they have not received their official acceptance packet in the mail.

 

Q: Is Wolf Pack Welcome orientation still on?

A: Stay tuned for emails regarding plans for the remaining Wolf Pack Welcome sessions, as they may potentially be held virtually.

 

Q: Will I still be allowed to visit campus?

A: For now, we are only allowing individual visits. Please note that we are currently unable to provide meetings with faculty and athletic staff. We encourage you to reschedule your visit when our programs resume or schedule an online appointment, offered daily, with your student’s admission counselor. Your student will receive information about this via email. Future visits and visit days will be determined as the situation unfolds.

 

Q: My school is closed, and I cannot obtain an official transcript. Will you accept an unofficial transcript?

A: Yes, we can accept unofficial copies of official transcripts, or an unofficial transcript downloaded from your online student portal. However, enrollment and federal and state financial aid eligibility are contingent upon receipt of an official transcript, so the final document will need to be submitted before classes begin for the fall 2020 semester.

 

Q: Is Newberry College still hosting events?

A: No. All structured student and campus activities, including all athletic events and summer camps, have been canceled though July 1.

For International Students

Q: When will I receive my I-20?

A: If you are an accepted international student, and if you have submitted your $300 enrollment fee, and if you have completed all financial aid certification forms and required materials, your I-20 will be sent to you within two weeks.

 

Q: If my country has been affected by COVID-19, will I still be allowed to attend Newberry College?

A: Newberry College welcome students from all around the world. We are monitoring the situation and will adhere to any decisions made by the United States government.

 

Q: If I am not able to attend Newberry College this fall, can I defer my admission to another term?

A: Yes, you can defer your admission for up to one year. If you do not enroll at another degree-granting institution during this time, your admission and financial aid package should remain the same. If your I-20 has been issued and received, you will need a new I-20 that indicates the correct start date and term. Should you enroll in another degree-seeking institution during this time, you will have to reapply as a transfer student.

 

Q: I have not yet received my international credentials for official evaluation. What should I do?

A: We will still need your international transcripts and diplomas officially evaluated. Most of the evaluating agencies are still evaluating documentation at this point. World Education Services (WES) have notified institutions and students that they will temporarily suspend operations through the end of March, so I would recommend using another agency such as Educational Credential Evaluators (ECE) or SpanTran to have your transcripts evaluated.

 

Q: I am unable to take or retake the ACT or SAT exams due to cancellations. What would you suggest?

A: For the remainder of the fall 2020 admission cycle, Newberry College will offer test-optional admission. If you are unable to provide an ACT or SAT score, or if your scores are lower than a 17 ACT combined / 910 SAT combined, you can provide a personal statement of 300 words or more to complete the application. Please send your personal statement to admission@newberry.edu.

 

Q: I am unable to take or retake my English Proficiency Exam (TOEFL, IELTS) due to cancellations and test-center closures. What would you suggest?

A: While an English Proficiency exam is still a requirement, under the circumstances, a student who is unable to provide a score can request an online interview instead. Please contact us at admission@newberry.edu to schedule your interview.

For Transfer Students

Q: Is Newberry College still accepting applications?

A: Yes, absolutely. The Office of Admission is still actively reviewing applications for admission for summer and fall 2020. You can submit your application online here or with the Common App.

 

Q: My school is closed, and I cannot obtain an official transcript. Will you accept an unofficial transcript?

A: Yes, we can accept unofficial copies of official transcripts, or an unofficial transcript downloaded from your online student portal. Your submissions should include your name, final grades, and credit hours, and should come from each college or university you have attended. However, enrollment and federal and state financial aid eligibility are contingent upon receipt of an official transcript, so the final document will need to be submitted before classes begin for the fall 2020 semester. Email your documents to admission@newberry.edu.

 

Q: What if my GPA is affected by changes due to COVID-19? How will this affect my admission to Newberry College?

A: We will continue to review applications holistically and take these unforeseen circumstances into account. If you are concerned about your GPA, please email us at admission@newberry.edu.

 

Q: Will I still be allowed to visit campus?

A: For now, we are only allowing individual visits. Please note that we are currently unable to provide meetings with faculty and athletic staff. We encourage you to reschedule your visit when our programs resume or schedule an online appointment, offered daily, with your student’s admission counselor. Your student will receive information about this via email. Future visits and visit days will be determined as the situation unfolds.

For Guidance Counselors

Q: I am scheduled to have a representative from Newberry College on my campus. Will you still be coming?

A: No. At this point, our spring travel has been suspended through July 1. If we have not already done so, we will reach out to you to reschedule our visit. If you wish, you can contact us at admission@newberry.edu with good dates and times to reschedule.

 

Q: Will Newberry's file processing be delayed?

A: We are continuing to review and process applications and materials. If you have a student for whom you wish to check the application status, email us at admission@newberry.edu.

 

Q: Our school is closed, and students are unable to get their official transcripts. Would you consider unofficial transcripts?

A: Yes, we will accept unofficial  transcripts for preliminary review. If you have access to official or unofficial transcripts for students who have applied to Newberry and who are looking to complete their applications, please email us at admission@newberry.edu. Of course, official transcripts are required before the beginning of classes in the new academic year.

 

Q: We have students who are unable to take or retake the ACT or SAT exams due to cancellations. What would you suggest?

A: For the remainder of the fall 2020 admission cycle, Newberry College will offer test-optional admission. If students are unable to provide ACT or SAT scores, or if their scores are lower than 17 ACT combined / 910 SAT combined, they can provide personal statements of 300 words or more to complete the application. Please have students send their personal statements to admission@newberry.edu.

Financial Aid

Q: I’ve submitted my FAFSA, but I haven’t received an award letter yet. When will I know more about my financial aid?

A: Each week, the Office of Financial Aid sends out awards to the most recently admitted students. Once your admission application is complete, and you are accepted to Newberry College, our office will prepare your package and email an award letter to you. If we need additional documentation from you, you will be notified via email.

 

Q: How do I get in touch if I need help with financial aid?

A: The best method of contact is email, at finaid@newberry.edu. You should receive a response within 24 hours.

 

Q: How do I view and manage my financial aid documents?

A: All of your required documents are located in Wolf Den. To access your required documents, follow these directions:

  • Log in to your Wolf Den account
  • Click on the “Financial Aid” tab at the top of the home page
  • Select “Click here to access your financial aid information"
  • To view and manage required documents, click on the menu icon at the top left corner of the screen, and select “Required Forms"

 

Q: My family’s income has been impacted as a result of COVID-19. Will the Office of Financial Aid consider these changes when creating an award letter?

A: Yes! If you have experienced a loss of income due to COVID-19, please contact the Office of Financial Aid at finaid@newberry.edu with “Special Circumstance: COVID-19” in the subject line. Provide a detailed explanation of your current financial situation.

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Coronavirus: FAQ

We're here to help.

Please see below for answers to frequently asked questions regarding the College's response to the COVID-19 outbreak. This page is updated regularly, so be sure to check back as things come up.

 

If you don't find answers to all your questions below, please do not hesitate to email ResponseTeam@newberry.edu.

 

Quick Links:

Returning to Campus for Fall ● Commencement & Graduation ● Campus Facilities & Services ● Health Services 

Spring Reimbursements & Finances ● Admission FAQs ● Higher Education Emergency Relief Fund

Students & Parents

Higher Education Emergency Relief Fund

What is the Higher Education Emergency Relief Fund?

Authorized through the Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security (CARES) Act, the Higher Education Emergency Relief Fund (HEERF) is a federally funded grant program. Through this program, colleges and universities are provided with a limited pool of money that can be used — in part — to provide direct grants to eligible students for expenses related to the disruption of campus operations due to COVID-19.

 

When will this HEERF money be made available to students at Newberry College?

Newberry College has already applied for its share of HEERF, and grants will be issued in accordance with federal and institutional policies once the funding has been received by the institution. The College anticipates that grants will start disbursing during the week of May 25, 2020. Interested and eligible students must apply for HEERF via the College’s official application process (see below).

 

How do eligible students apply for HEERF?

Eligible students who wish to apply for HEERF must complete and submit an Emergency Grant Affidavit directly to the Office of Financial Aid via email at finaid@newberry.edu. Click here to view the fillable application. The affidavit is also available in Wolf Den under the Financial Aid tab. Students who apply will receive outcome notifications exclusively via institutional email. The application deadline is Monday, June 15, 2020.

 

Which students are eligible for HEERF?

Students who were actively enrolled in academic coursework on or after March 13, 2020, and who meet basic eligibility criteria for Federal Student Aid (FSA) may qualify for HEERF consideration. Since eligibility for FSA is determined through an analysis of a student’s Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA), the College strongly encourages students who have not filed a 2019-2020 FAFSA to do so immediately.

 

Which students are not eligible for HEERF?

Based on current regulations announced by the United States Department of Education, the following types of students are not eligible for HEERF: (1) students enrolled exclusively in online degree programs, and (2) ineligible non-citizens.

 

What can HEERF be used for?

In accordance with federal regulations, direct grants issued to students via HEERF may be used for expenses related directly to the disruption of campus operations due to COVID-19. Students with outstanding account balances are encouraged — but not required — to consider using these funds to help settle their financial obligations to the College.

 

Is HEERF availability limited?

Yes. Newberry College has been federally allocated a finite amount of HEERF. Once the funding has been exhausted, program availability will cease. The College makes no promises — implied or otherwise — about the availability of HEERF funding for the 2020-2021 academic year.

 


Commencement & Graduation 

Q: When will commencement exercises be held for the class of May 2020?

A: Newberry will host a special commencement ceremony on Saturday, Sept. 19. Specific information regarding location, time, and ticket procedures will be announced in late July. Anyone who can’t make the September commencement is invited to participate in December commencement.

 

Q: When and how will I receive my diploma and regalia?

A: Diplomas and regalia have been mailed to students who were not able to pick them up. Please keep your regalia in good condition, as you will need it to participate in your upcoming commencement exercises.

 

Q: Are there any fees associated with graduation?

A: Students planning to graduate pay a graduation fee to cover the costs associated with graduation and commencement. Since you are graduating on Saturday and commencement exercises will be held in September, there will be no refunds of graduation fees. There will be no added cost associated with mailing diplomas and regalia.

 


Returning to Campus for Fall 2020

Q: What will fall semester look like?

A: We are truly looking forward to beginning the fall semester in August as scheduled. In preparation, we are taking measures to ensure the health and safety of our students, faculty, and staff in this ‘new normal’ of the coronavirus era. This means learning, living, and dining in a clean, socially distant environment. Our small and secure Newberry College campus is conducive to this.

  • We will reconfigure residence hall rooms and common areas, and we will create a number of small living-learning communities in several of the College-owned houses that adjoin the campus
  • We will most likely stagger dining times in the cafeteria, eliminate self-serve meal lines, expand the dining area, and utilize outdoor dining space
  • While the majority of classes will be taught in-person, we will also hold some courses online, in a hybrid format to reduce the number of people in classrooms at one time
  • We will also work with our partners, Aramark and Sodexo, to ensure regular deep cleansing and sanitation of all our campus spaces

As a way to end on-campus classes by Thanksgiving, there will be no fall break. Holding final exams may occur before Thanksgiving or we may have final exams virtually immediately after the holiday. This revised academic calendar will allow us to reduce unnecessary travel for our students and the semester break will begin earlier.

 

Q: What about fall sports?

A: We expect to have more information from the NCAA and the SAC about resuming our fall sports soon. Currently, it is our intention to have all of our fall sports compete as scheduled. We will do whatever we can to offer our student-athletes the opportunity to safely play their sport this fall.

 


Campus Facilities & Services 

Q: What campus events have been canceled?

A: All structured student, athletic, and on-campus activities, including summer camps and private functions, have been canceled through Wednesday, July 1.

 

Q: Is the campus bookstore open to puchase or return textbooks?

A:  The bookstore is closed to in-person visits.

  • For purchases: Online transactions, free ground shipping, and access to free ebooks can be found on the bookstore website.
  • For rental book returns: The bookstore will utilize mail-in returns, providing free shipping lables for U.S. customers via email when it comes time to return your books. But don't worry about late fees. The return grace period has been extended to 15 days after the due date. 
  • You can view digital ebook options for many textbooks on the bookstore website.
  • To sell textbooks back to the bookstore: Please use the Sell Your Textbooks” link.
  • For more specific information and bookstore FAQs, click here.

 

Q: What facilities and services are available on campus?

A: Wessels Library, dining services, and all recreational facilities are currently closed. The following campus services have posted virtual office hours:

  • Office of Disability Services
    • Monday, Wednesday, Friday, from noon to 2 p.m. via Zoom
    • Meeting ID: 845-4718-4962, Password: 4dBamd
    • To schedule an appointment outside these hours, click here
  • Center for Career Development
    • Each day from noon to 2 p.m. via Zoom
    • Meeting ID: 541-480-7217

 

Q: What do I do with my post office key?

A: You keep your key until you graduate or transfer. Graduating seniors and transfer students must have turned in their post office keys by Wednesday, May 20, to avoid a $50 fine.

 


Health Services 

Q: What do I do if I develop symptoms of COVID-19? 

A: If you exhibit symptoms — which include fever (100.4⁰ F or greater), dry cough, shortness of breath, and difficulty breathing — health professionals request that you complete an online screening at either PrismaHealth.org or MUSC.care (use the code COVID19). The sites will direct you to your next steps, and you may be directed to your local emergency room. If so, call the location to let them know that you have been screened and directed to them. If on or near campus, please do not go to the campus health services office for this condition.

 

As always, if you experience a life-threatening emergency, call 911 and go to the emergency room.

 

Q: Is campus counseling available?

A: For students who have been receiving counseling services at Newberry College, phone sessions are currently available to continue counseling. You may email Martha.Dorrell@newberry.edu or call 803.321.5373. If you are in need of counseling services while home and have not received counseling on campus previously, please contact a mental health care provider within your community. If you need assistance in locating a provider, you may contact Lisa.Gibson@newberry.edu or 803.321.5271.

 


Reimbursements for Unused Spring Room & Board

Q: How do I view and obtain my reimbursement?

A: Log in to your Wolf Den account to begin the process.

 

Q: What if I owe an outstanding balance to the College? Will I be reimbursed?

A: If a student owes a balance to the College, the reimbursement will first go to pay off the balance. This reimbursement will appear as a credit on the student's account. If the student's reimbursement amount is greater than the balance owed, the student will have the opportunity to choose how the difference is distributed (see next question).

 

Q: How will I receive my reimbursement?

A: Students who are in good standing may request to have this amount:

  • credited toward a future semester
  • sent as a reimbursement check
  • made a tax-deductible gift to the College

We encourage returning students to carry forward any credit, as it would reduce the amount of future loans needed and lower the overall costs of a future semester. The credit may also be applied toward summer terms.

 

Q: When will reimbursements be processed?

A: Checks were distributed the week of May 11.

 

Q: If I remained on campus through the full spring semester, will I be reimbursed?

A: No. Reimbursements are for unused room and board. Students who remained on campus beyond March 24 are not eligible for reimbursement.

 

Q: How was my reimbursement calculated?

A: The residence hall rental and meal plan is based on 128 days in the spring semester. Some students moved out around March 16, which means they had room and board for 75 days and lost 53 days. Other students moved out around March 24, and they had room and board for 83 days and lost 45 days. All reimbursement calculations on the prorated number of days a student utilized on-campus dining and housing. Students who remained on campus beyond March 24 are not eligible for reimbursement.

 

The College’s institutional aid package, provided to all students, reduces the cost of tuition, fees, room and board, and approximately 30% of this aid reduces the cost of room and board. Therefore, 30% of any aid — institutional, state scholarships, athletic aid, endowment scholarships, private grants, etc. — has been applied against the student’s room and board charge (22% for students on the Oakland Mill reduced meal plan). The reimbursement has been reduced by this prorated share of aid since this is not a payment made by the student. The only other reduction in the calculated reimbursement is a $100 charge per student for the unavoidable COVID-19-related expenses incurred in the deep cleansing and sanitization actions to prevent the possible spread of illness.

 

EXAMPLE: A student lives in Brokaw Hall and has a full meal plan. The cost of the room and board for the spring semester is $5,500. When all of the aid received by the student (excluding any student loans) is added up, the student has received $8,000 of total aid for the semester. Of this aid, 70% is applied against the student’s tuition and fees. The remaining 30% is applied against room and board. The student has no amount owed to the College and the student moved out on March 16.

Total room & board charges:   $5,500.00
Applied 30% of total aid:   — $2,400.00
Total student contribution:   $3,100.00

Used funds (75 days):       — $1,816.60
Sanitation costs:           — $100.00
Reimbursement (53 days):      $1,183.40

 

Q: Do these remittances have anything to do with the CARES Act?

A: These remittances are reimbursements for unused room and board expenses, not a form of stimulus or recovery funds.

 

Q: How will my remittance appear on my account?

A: The remittances are listed in each student's account as: "Spring 2020 COVID 19 Remittance."

 

Q: What if I have a financial hold on my account?

A: As we continue to navigate these uncharted waters, our thoughts are especially with those who are in need of a little financial relief to continue their college journey. In that spirit, we have lifted all financial holds on student accounts at this time, thereby allowing all returning students to register for fall 2020 classes at their designated time. This is a one-time allowance, reflective of the difficult times faced by many families. Students registering under this exception know their account balance and payment in full, or a signed payment plan, must be finalized prior to Monday, June 1, to avoid class schedule cancellation.

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College Updates Re: COVID-19

Spring classes have concluded, and Newberry College is looking ahead to the 2020-2021 academic year.

Please see below for previous guidance and updates on the situation as it relates to the well-being of members of the Newberry College community.

 

FAQs for students and parents.

FAQs for prospective students and families.

These pages are updated regularly.

 

Please contact ResponseTeam@newberry.edu with additional questions or concerns.

Thursday, May 28

A Message from President Maurice Scherrens

 

Dear Newberry College Community:

 

I hope you, your families and friends are doing well and staying safe as we work to emerge from the coronavirus.

 

I am so proud of how our faculty, staff, and students have handled the transition to virtual learning this past spring and the College community efforts to keep our campus safe. I’m especially proud of our 135 May graduates, our resilient Class of 2020, who overcame numerous obstacles at the end of their undergraduate careers to earn their degrees and the rank of Newberry College alumni. Though we haven’t had the opportunity to celebrate the accomplishments of our seniors yet, their day will soon come, and I can’t wait to celebrate with them.

 

Commencement

I am happy to announce that we will hold special commencement exercises on Saturday, Sept. 19, for our spring and summer graduates. It is Lutheran Day on campus, and it will likely be a late morning ceremony. Later that same day, our football team will play Lenoir-Rhyne University in our second home game of the year. Specific information regarding location, time, and tickets for Commencement will be announced in late July. Anyone unable to attend the September commencement is invited to participate in the December commencement.

 

Summer 2020 Plans

Right now, all dining services, athletics and other events, summer camps and other structured activities have been suspended. All summer session courses will be taught online, at a reduced cost and with an expanded variety of course offerings. I encourage all incoming and returning students to check out the expanded summer courses here.

 

Fall 2020 Plans

We are truly looking forward to beginning the fall semester in August as scheduled. In preparation, we are taking measures to ensure the health and safety of our students, faculty, and staff in this ‘new normal’ of the coronavirus era. This means learning, living, and dining in a clean, socially distant environment. Our small and secure Newberry College campus is conducive to this.

  • We will reconfigure residence hall rooms and common areas, and we will create a number of small living-learning communities in several of the College-owned houses that adjoin the campus
  • We will most likely stagger dining times in the cafeteria, eliminate self-serve meal lines, expand the dining area, and utilize outdoor dining space
  • While the majority of classes will be taught in-person, we will also hold some courses online, in a hybrid format to reduce the number of people in classrooms at one time
  • We will also work with our partners, Aramark and Sodexo, to ensure regular deep cleansing and sanitation of all our campus spaces

As a way to end on-campus classes by Thanksgiving, there will be no fall break. Holding final exams may occur before Thanksgiving or we may have final exams virtually immediately after the holiday. This revised academic calendar will allow us to reduce unnecessary travel for our students and the semester break will begin earlier.

 

J-Term 2021 Announcement

The College intends to re-introduce a J-Term, a month-long semester, with classes beginning on Jan. 4, 2021. More information on this new opportunity will be forthcoming later this summer.

 

Athletics Programs

We expect to have more information from the NCAA and the SAC about resuming our fall sports soon. Currently, it is our intention to have all of our fall sports compete as scheduled. We will do whatever we can to offer our student-athletes the opportunity to safely play their sport this fall.

 

Planning for Possibilities

While we remain vigilant as the situation continues to evolve, and while we plan for possible changes, it is our plan to reopen on time. We will come back safe and strong. While we are doing everything we can to ensure a safe campus environment, changes in circumstances and official guidance may mean changes in the plan. Dr. Sid Parrish and Dr. Christy Wendland and others have prepared an academic calendar for the fall semester that begins on Aug. 17 and ends on Nov. 24.

 

I want to emphasize that Newberry College is known and loved for its in-person, personalized instruction, and assuming health and safety can be maintained, we will reconvene with classroom instruction in August as scheduled.

 

Easing Student Financial Burdens

The reality and the lingering uncertainty of the coronavirus crisis has caused many students and families to reevaluate their financial situation. Newberry College is doing everything possible to ease financial burdens during this time, and to provide access to other means of financial assistance as they become available.

 

Over recent weeks, we have distributed reimbursements to spring 2020 on-campus residential students, reduced the price of tuition associated with summer session courses, and temporarily lifted financial holds on student accounts to allow them to register for summer and fall courses on time.

 

We have also received additional aid through the Higher Education Emergency Relief Fund (HEERF), provided by the U.S. Department of Education. This fund offers assistance through direct grants to eligible students for expenses related to the disruption of campus operations due to COVID-19. For more information on the program and the simple application process, please visit the College’s Coronavirus FAQ webpage. The deadline for applications is Monday, June 15, 2020.

 

College Fiscal Burden

This pandemic has created a financial challenge for the College. I announced just a few weeks ago the Board of Trustees has reviewed a number of different scenarios regarding the fiscal recovery of the College. At a recent town hall for faculty and staff members, I reviewed three budget scenarios based on student enrollment. Recruiting and retaining our student body is, by far, the top priority for the fiscal health of the College. Under all budget scenarios, we will initiate several cost-containment strategies to ensure maintenance of a sound sustainable business model. Similar to other colleges across the country, if the student enrollment for the fall drops by 15-20 percent (which is our worse-case scenario), a significant number of positions will need to be eliminated and operating budgets reduced. We are projecting a better fall opening, but we are prepared.

 

A State of Becoming

In closing, as an institution and as a society, we are always in a state of becoming, and we are positioned well to weather this setback and emerge strong. I am comforted by the thoughts that, "when nothing is certain, everything is possible," and "out of adversity comes opportunity." Together we will lean on each other. We will keep the faith and make smart decisions. Our fortitude and persistence will show us the way. I hope this update gives you some comfort that we will have the campus ready for your safe return to college life.

 

Stay safe. See you soon!

 

Morrie

 

Dr. Maurice W. Scherrens

President

Thursday, May 7

Newberry College Board of Trustees Reviews Reopening Game Plan Options

This news release was published the morning of May 7.

 

Newberry College’s Board of Trustees has reviewed a preliminary action plan for the start of the 2020-2021 academic year this fall, following a spring semester marred by the COVID-19 pandemic.

 

“If the spread of the disease continues to decline and the campus receives advice and counsel from the health professionals that reopening is allowable,” said President Maurice Scherrens, “Newberry College will be ready to enter into this ‘new normalcy’ with a safe and secure environment, committed to creating an effective and exciting learning and co-curricular experience. We will open Newberry strong.”

 

The college plans to begin the fall semester with classes on campus as scheduled in August, with modifications to ensure social distancing and other provisions for the health of students and employees. The administration also presented models with differing enrollment levels and with different semester start dates. While no cases of COVID-19 have been identified on campus, the models were presented amid uncertainty regarding the duration of the COVID-19 pandemic and its potential effects on student enrollment and operations.

 

The college intends to offer some courses online to ensure a safe campus environment, however most courses will be taught with fewer than 20-25 students in the classroom with adequate physical distancing. In addition to redesigning living spaces in the residence halls to increase social distancing, the college will create a number of small living learning communities in several of the college-owned houses that adjoin the campus. The college will also reconfigure the cafeteria and increase dining space by utilizing outdoor dining and enhancing the indoor dining venue.

 

“Out of adversity comes opportunity,” said Rob Best, 1971 Newberry graduate and chair of the board. “And we see a perfect opportunity for the College to emerge from this stronger and safe.”

 

The board also reaffirmed the college’s capability to continue social distancing protocols, in large part due to its 12:1 student-to-faculty ratio, compared to larger universities. College officials have already initiated cleaning and intense sanitation of campus facilities and are developing a health clearance protocol for all incoming and returning students, faculty and staff. 

 

“Uncertainty requires institutional agility and a state of readiness for a number of different options. We are prepared for these different scenarios, but today, we fully expect to start on time in the fall under a ‘new normal’ brought on by COVID-19,” said Scherrens. “Newberry College is well suited to maintain a safe environment for students, faculty and staff. College life will be different, but the learning environment will remain vibrant and the social life of our students will be re-imagined.”

Monday, May 4

Message for 2020 Graduates from Dr. Sid Parrish

Updated 12:55 p.m.

 

Members of the graduating class of spring 2020:

 

This is a big week for you all. While we cannot celebrate with you in person on Saturday, this does not diminish your accomplishments. This is a major milestone and we are all proud of you. 

 

You may have some questions about how you will receive your diplomas, regalia, and Alumni Association memberships. Here are our plans:

 

1.  Diplomas and regalia may be picked up by appointment at the registrar’s office starting next week. Please email Cindy Shealy at Cindy.Shealy@newberry.edu for an appointment. In order to ensure social distancing, only one graduate is permitted in the office at one time. No guests please. For those of you who can’t make it to campus, diplomas and regalia will be mailed to you. Please keep your regalia in good condition, as you will need it to participate in your upcoming commencement ceremony.

 

2.  Newberry will host a special commencement ceremony on Sept. 19. Specific information regarding location, time, and ticket procedures will be announced in late July. Anyone who can’t make the September commencement is invited to participate in December commencement.

 

3.  Students planning to graduate pay a graduation fee to cover the costs associated with graduation and commencement. Since you are graduating on Saturday and commencement exercises will be held in September, there will be no refunds of graduation fees. There will be no added cost associated with mailing diplomas and regalia.

 

4. Be sure to watch your email and follow our official social media pages, where we will honor our graduates later this week. Like and follow us on FacebookInstagram, and Twitter.

 

If you have any other questions, please email our dedicated team at ResponseTeam@newberry.edu and check the FAQ page for ongoing updates.

 

In the future, please remember to stay in touch. You will soon become alumni, and Newberry will always remain a home away from home.

  

Stay safe and congratulations on your academic achievement.

 

Dr. Sid Parrish

Vice President for Academic Affairs

Wednesday, April 15

Freshman Registration to be Paused for Wolf Pack Welcome

Updated 10:25 a.m.

 

The course registration portal will be temporarily closed for 24 hours, beginning at midnight on Friday, April 17, to accommodate virtual Wolf Pack Welcome orientation. Freshmen will be able to resume registration on Saturday, April 18.

Tuesday, April 14

Message from President Maurice Scherrens on Spring Reimbursements

This message was sent to students, faculty and staff at 4:11 p.m.

 

Dear Students and Families,

 

I hope each of you are doing well as you study off campus. Last week we made several updates to our operations in response to COVID-19, including that May and summer courses will be offered online, new grading options are available, and financial holds have been lifted as fall registration gets underway. I write to you today with updates regarding reimbursements and a summer session tuition pricing change.

 

Reimbursements

Last week the Board of Trustees approved a plan to reimburse students for unused room and board. Reimbursements will be based upon each student's financial aid package. If a student owes a balance to the College, the reimbursement will first go to pay off the balance. This reimbursement will appear as a credit on the student's account. Students who are in good standing may request to have this credit: (a) applied to a future semester such as summer or fall; (b) sent as a reimbursement check; or (c) made a tax-deductible gift to the College.

 

We encourage returning students to carry forward any credit for the following reasons:

  • Your credit will reduce the amount of loans you will need to borrow for the fall 2020 semester
  • Your credit may be used for your payment plan and applied toward fall 2020 semester tuition and fees
  • Your credit may be applied toward May and summer 2020 terms

 

Specific details about how to make your choice regarding reimbursements will be available on your Wolf Den page on Thursday, April 16, along with answers to frequently asked questions on the Coronavirus: FAQ website.

 

Summer Session Tuition Price Reduction

For summer 2020 terms, the price for courses will be $300 per credit hour. We are eliminating the standard $125 common fee previously associated with a three-hour course. We hope this reduction makes enrolling in summer courses more accessible for our students. Some federal financial aid may be available for summer sessions. Please contact the financial aid office for details.

 

Summer Session Courses

To continue supporting your academic needs, we are offering numerous new courses for our summer sessions. Each course will be taught online. We encourage you to take advantage of the lower costs, as well as the expanded variety of course offerings, to aide in your academic endeavors this summer. Please take a look at the summer session course offerings here.

 

Stay safe, healthy, and Hail the Scarlet & Gray,

 

Morrie

 

Dr. Maurice W. Scherrens

President

Thursday, April 9

Message from President Maurice Scherrens

This message was sent to students at 9:46 a.m.

 

Dear Students and Families,

 

In these last few days, there have been a number of new developments and we have made some very important decisions in our ongoing response to the coronavirus pandemic. I am reaching out to thank you for your continued support and patience as we work through these difficult times. What I have witnessed during these coronavirus days has been the unbelievable ability of Newberry College Wolves to adapt to an ever-changing environment, while exhibiting an unwavering commitment to academic excellence and a genuine concern for the welfare of others. Here is what is new:

 

  • Our May Term and Summer courses will be taught online. I know this news may be disappointing to some, but the courses will continue to have the same academic rigor as when taught face-to-face in the classroom. We will continue supporting students in the online environment through the Center for Student Success, virtual tutoring, and expanded academic coaching. The Vice President for Academic Affairs (VPAA) will work with faculty to ensure course seats are available to all students who need a May Term course. The VPAA will also be working with faculty to increase the number of courses that are offered in Summer I and Summer II.

 

  • The College is sharing a room and board reimbursement plan with the Board of Trustees this week and the details of the plan will be released on Tuesday, April 14. Thank you for your patience on this matter.

 

  • On Tuesday, the faculty voted to adopt a pass/unsatisfactory grading option for students. This option is applicable for students taking courses during the spring 2020 semester. This policy will provide students with the flexibility to choose a final grade option that best meets their academic and career goals at the end of the semester. Our academic advisors will help students determine the best grading strategy. Additional details are available at Coronavirus FAQ.

 

  • With the change in the grading scale, some students may want a little extra time to make a decision about dropping a class. Therefore, the last day to drop a course with a grade of “W” has been extended to Tuesday, April 28

 

  • As we continue to navigate these uncharted waters, our thoughts are especially with those who are in need of a little financial relief to continue their college journey. In that spirit, we have lifted all financial holds on student accounts at this time, thereby allowing all returning students to register for fall 2020 classes at their designated time. This is a one-time allowance, reflective of the difficult times faced by many families. Students registering under this exception know their account balance and payment in full, or a signed payment plan, must be finalized prior to Monday, June 1, to avoid class schedule cancellation. It is our hope that this delay of payment allowance helps ease the financial hardship felt by some of our families. Our Student Accounts and Financial Aid Office staff is available to help students. We want you to return, so please resolve this as soon as possible.

 

  • Summer camps and other summer activities that bring large numbers of people to our campus are also canceled.

 

In closing, I continue to be impressed with the adaptability and the resilience shown by our students, faculty, and staff. Every day I see more examples of the genuine concern that is being shown for others. To the Wolf Nation, I am proud that we are all in the same pack as we defeat this virus and make Newberry College better than it has ever been. We are Newberry Strong.

 

Take care and stay safe,

 

Morrie

 

Dr. Maurice Scherrens

President

Wednesday, April 1

Updated 10:38 a.m.

 

Residence Life Move-Out Instructions

Following the College's decision to finish the semester in the virtual learning format, the Office of Housing & Residence Life has provided instructions for retrieving students' personal belongings from the residence halls. For more information and FAQs, click here.

Tuesday, March 31

Updated 3:36 p.m.

 

Update on Student Assistance during Virtual Learning

With the decision to extend virtual learning through the end of the semester, Newberry College has expanded its efforts to ensure students have all they need to be successful in an online education environment.

 

Every student who has requested to borrow a College laptop has received one. The count is 12 so far. The response team has heard from one student wiht internet access concerns, and the Center for Student Success is reaching out to acquire more information.

 

The College is also in the process of contacting each student to see how they are doing, generally and with regard to virtual learning. Students will hear from faculty, staff and alumni, and this effort will continue through the end of the semester.

Friday, March 27

A Special Video Message from President Maurice Scherrens

President Maurice Scherrens offers a few words of encouragement for these turbulent times.

Click the image to view on YouTube.

 

Thursday, March 26

Message from President Maurice Scherrens

This message was sent to faculty, staff and students at 3:49 p.m.

 

Dear Campus Community,

 

In the past few weeks we have seen events that most of us never imagined. Entire countries are under quarantine. In the United States we are doing everything we can to reduce person-to-person contact to slow the spread of this virus. We know this has impacted you and your families in different ways. I share with you today: We are here for you. We are continuing to offer the same level of support as we did when students were on campus. Our library, tutoring, student support and academic coaching, counseling, and student affairs offices are all open virtually and ready to support you. So far, we have no COVID-19 cases on our campus and only one in Newberry County.

 

Online Education Continuing through the end of the semester: Out of a continued abundance of caution, Newberry College will continue holding classes in the virtual learning format through the end of the spring semester. The health and safety of our community is our top priority, and I have full confidence in our students, faculty, and staff to finish this academic year strong.

 

Residence Hall Closures: In an effort to contain the spread of the coronavirus, most all of our students have moved out of the residence halls and away from our dining facilities. We are currently reviewing U.S. Department of Education guidance on reimbursements for this loss of use and will communicate our plan soon. Thank you for your patience as we work through these turbulent times. Also, when it is safe to do so, we will share a plan for all students to return to campus and get their personal belongings.

 

Academic Support: I am pleased to share that every student will have direct communication with someone in the College community — whether they are faculty, staff, coaches, or alumni — who will be in regular contact to make sure they have everything they need to be successful in this online learning environment.

 

Graduation and Commencement: Based on the most recent guidance from DHEC and the CDC, we have decided to postpone the on-campus commencement ceremony on May 9. This does not change the graduation date for seniors. Seniors who meet graduation requirements will receive their diplomas in the mail soon after the semester is concluded. We know this is a disappointment to our graduating seniors and are working on a plan to celebrate your accomplishments with you. In the next few days, we will consult with the Student Government Association (SGA) President and President of the Senior Class to determine the best options for our graduating seniors and families. A decision will be announced soon.

 

Registration for Fall, May and Summer: Students and faculty have been working diligently to adjust to a new mode of learning. We have delayed registration by one week. Sophomores and Juniors will begin registration on April 6. Freshmen will begin registration on April 13. Students will work virtually with their advisors to discuss their schedules. The registration process will take place online in Wolf Den as it has in the past. Be on the lookout for an email from Registrar Whitney Merinar with more information.

 

May and Summer: May Term and Summer courses will still be offered. If the situation allows, we will return to in-seat classroom instruction. If not, we will move those courses online as well.

 

Housing Selection: The Office of Housing and Residence Life has been working to move housing selection online. This has taken a little bit of time. Therefore, housing selection will begin April 13. Look for an email from the Office of Housing and Residence Life with further information to follow.

 

Just a reminder to check the FAQ website for answers to other questions not addressed in this letter.

 

In closing, I just want to say how thankful I am to all of you for all you’re doing, and how optimistic I am for what we have yet to do. In the words of Nelson Mandela, “It always seems impossible until it’s done.” And we’ll get it done together.

 

Take care,

 

Morrie

Maurice W. Scherrens

President

 

Office of Admission to Streamline Admittance Process

Added 12:05 p.m.

 

The Office of Admission has announced changes in the admittance application to help streamline the process for prospective and transfer students who have been affected by the ongoing spread of COVID-19. Click here for the full story.

Sunday, March 22

Updated 1:40 p.m.

 

Tutoring online, via Zoom, has begun. For more information on Zoom and details regarding how tutoring will work while classes are online, go to the question, "Will tutoring be available during virtual learning?" on the FAQ page.

 

The staff at Wessels Library knows there will be questions and is available to answer them. Don’t hesitate to reach out to the following people with any concerns you have.

 

Reid Austin

Carl Lominick 

Belle Mazurik 

Friday, March 20

Statement from President Maurice Scherrens

This message was sent to students at 5:03 p.m.

 

Dear Students,

 

Yesterday was a bold, new day for Newberry College: our first full day of virtual classes. Wherever you are, we hope you are safe, healthy, and adjusting to this new learning environment. The faculty and staff have confidence in you. You can do this! Our faculty and staff are here to help you all along the way.

 

Many of you have asked whether we will return to campus this semester. Honestly, that answer has yet to be determined. We are monitoring this constantly evolving situation, and we remain committed to making a decision by March 31. 

 

As a reminder, residence halls are closed. Students who have left campus may not return at this time. If you have a need to retrieve something from your on-campus room, please contact Amanda Halfacre (Amanda.Halfacre@newberry.edu) to set up a time.  Someone will meet you at the outer door of your residence hall. No one should be in the residence hall without notifying Amanda Halfacre.

 

Many of you have also asked what happens if and when classes physically resume on campus. What if circumstances prevent your return? We understand that some students may not be able to return to in-seat classroom instruction this semester for a number of reasons. But if we do return to in-person classroom learning, students will also be able to finish the semester online.

 

What about May Term? A decision on May Term has not yet been made. May Term courses will be offered. If the situation allows, we will return to in-seat classroom instruction. If not, we will move those courses online as well. Whichever happens, students needing a May Term course to complete graduation requirements will be able to take it this May.

 

The last two questions we have received focus on tuition, fees, room and board. First, regarding tuition and fees: The College intends to continue all classes through the end of the semester. You will complete your work and receive full credit for all of your courses. There will be no reimbursements for tuition and fees. 

 

The College understands residential students have had to leave campus and wish to know about any possible reimbursement of room and board. Many of our students utilize federal funding to help pay for their room and board. The U.S. Department of Education has not yet given guidance on how the College must handle these funds. Additionally, most of our students receive institutional aid, and many receive athletic aid or other assistance from third parties to reduce cost. These factors will all be considered, plus the pending guidance from the Department of Education to determine each student’s reimbursement. We will move as swiftly as possible to make these reimbursement decisions.

 

For any questions you may have, we have updates on our FAQs page, which is regularly updated as new things come up. I encourage you to follow our social media platforms for breaking news. Also be sure to continue to check our COVID-19 information page for all the latest updates on College operations. If you don't see an answer to your question, please email ResponseTeam@newberry.edu.

 

Thank you and take care.

 

Morrie

Maurice W. Scherrens

President


Updated 1:45 p.m.

 

To minimize exposure and risk for all involved, Newberry College asks that students do not to return to campus at this time. Instead, students are encouraged to wait to gather items from rooms until further notice. A follow-up decision should be issued by Tuesday, March 31. If a student has an absolutely urgent need to access their room, please call 803.321.5328 or 803.944.1344 at least 24 hours before the time of an intended visit.

Thursday, March 19

Updated 1:40 p.m.


The campus bookstore is closed to the public through Sunday, April 5. Store Manager Michael Toole will be available for limited services, including faculty textbook adoptions and processing online orders, at Michael.Toole@newberry.edu and 803.321.5144. Free ground shipping and access to free ebooks can be found on the bookstore website. For faculty, the textbook adoption deadline remains unchanged. For students, rental books are due Friday, May 8, and the grace period returns has been extended to 15 days after the deadline to accommodate mail-in returns.

Wednesday, March 18

Statement from President Maurice Scherrens Regarding the Closing of Residence Halls

This message was sent to students, faculty, and staff at 4:13 p.m.
 

Dear Newberry College Family,

 

Based upon the most recent COVID-19 pandemic information and our commitment to ensure the safety of our students, faculty and staff, Newberry College will close all residence halls effective Friday, March 20, at 5 p.m. This closure of the residence halls will continue through Friday, April 3. A decision will be made and communicated to all by March 31 if and when the residence halls will re-open.

 

For those students who cannot leave campus due to extenuating circumstances, a Campus Stay Request Form must be approved by the Office of Residence Life. This form is available online here. Student exceptions to this directive to leave the campus will be very limited.

 

The campus is taking this measure to move students off-campus in an effort to ensure the on-going health and well-being of all members of the college community. We are being guided daily by advice and counsel from the S.C. Department of Health & Environmental Control, the Centers for Disease Control, and the network of South Carolina Independent Colleges and Universities (SCICU).

 

Students are not required to remove all personal belongings from their rooms at this time. If there is a decision to extend the closing of the residence halls beyond April 3, an official plan regarding the removal of personal belongings will be shared after that date.

 

Effective immediately, the library and all recreational facilities will be closed. Campus dining will continue, but will be limited to take-out-only service effective with breakfast on Thursday, March 19. After Friday, a revised dining plan will be shared with all students authorized to remain on campus. This measure is consistent with recent guidance from the Governor’s Office relative to eliminating group dining venues.

 

As we complete the transition to virtual learning, the College has a limited number of laptops to loan to students who otherwise would not have access to the online instruction, beginning on Thursday. Students should contact ResponseTeam@newberry.edu to request a loaner laptop.

 

Please continue to monitor our COVID-19 information page for daily updates on College operations, and regularly visit the frequently asked questions (FAQ) page for the most recent information. If you have any questions that are not answered, do not hesitate to contact ResponseTeam@newberry.edu and an answer will be provided as quickly as possible.

 

I know every decision we make is causing a disruption in the lives of each and every member of the College family, and I regret the necessity of having to take such actions. I can only hope that you understand that these decisions are being made to do whatever we can to lessen the spread of this disease, and to keep the members of the Newberry College community as safe as possible. By working together, we will get through this state of emergency. Thank you for your patience and your support.

 

Take care,

  

Morrie

Tuesday, March 17

Updated 6:03 p.m.
 

Summary of Student Meeting with President Scherrens

 

On Monday, President Scherrens held a mandatory meeting with residential students still on campus. The meeting served as a personal update from the president on the work the College is doing to keep students safe and on track to finish the semester, and he also took questions and received helpful feedback from students.

 

In summary:

 

  • The president encouraged students to go home if it would be safe and feasible for them, and as long as they would be able to complete coursework in the virtual learning setting.
  • Regarding staying on campus:
    • College officials are working to keep the College as safe as possible. Residence halls, dining services, and academic and non-academic spaces will remain open, but with reduced services. Newberry, like all schools in the state, is limiting the number of students on campus to minimize the risk of the spread of illness.
    • There is a residential exception authorization process being implemented at this time. For those students who are allowed to remain, visitors are not allowed.
    • For those students who have left campus, they may return to collect their belongings only with the approval and assistance of the Office of Residence Life. Those students may not resume on-campus residence until further notice, to reduce the risk of the spread of illness.
  • Regarding virtual learning, the president stated that faculty and staff are making every effort to ensure students meet course requirements and finish out the semester.
    • The College is in the process of moving coursework online, with the future possibility of hybrid classes — online and in-person — depending on how the situation unfolds.
    • In this transition to a virtual learning environment, the College will support students as they learn how to become online learners, but President Scherrens emphasized that students will need to put in the effort to succeed.
  • The president also pressed the vital need for social distancing, in addition to common-sense hygienic actions, to keep people healthy. This involves
    • avoiding large gatherings
    • maintaining approximately six (6) feet of distance between individuals
    • no hugging or handshakes
    • avoiding unnecessary travel
  • This is necessary to ensure the slowing of the virus’ spread so that fewer people need to seek treatment at any given time, thereby “flattening the curve” of the pandemic.

Students and parents: Comcast / Xfinity is now opening up free Wi-Fi hotspots for anyone who needs them, through the Comcast / Xfinity Internet Essentials Program. This program will be offered for free to qualifying households for 60 days. Comcast / Xfinity will be working with all customers to ensure there are no disconnections or late fees, offering flexible payment options. For more information, click here.


Students: The last day to drop a class and receive a grade of "W" (Withdrawn) has been extended to Tuesday, March 31, ahead of the original March 18 deadline.

Monday, March 16

College Begins Transition to Virtual Learning

Updated 5:02 p.m.

 

On Monday, faculty and staff began on-campus meetings to put into motion plans to transition to a virtual learning environment, beginning Thursday, March 19.


President Maurice Scherrens will hold a mandatory meeting with students still on campus tonight at 7 p.m. The meeting will serve as a personal update from the president on plans moving forward, as well as a Q&A session with students.


The 2020 Athletic Club / Football Annual Golf Classic, originally scheduled for Thursday, April 16, has been postponed until Thursday, June 11.


All academic tutoring will be available online, via Zoom, beginning Sunday, March 22. See the Coronavirus FAQ page for more information regarding tutoring.

Friday, March 13

Statement on Changes in Newberry College Operations

College to transition to virtual learning beginning March 19

 

Newberry College’s chief responsibility is protecting the health, safety, and well-being of its students, faculty, and staff. While there are no known cases of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) on the Newberry College campus, out of an abundance of caution, President Maurice Scherrens has announced the following changes in College operations, effective immediately:

 

  • From Monday, March 16, through Wednesday, March 18, classes will be canceled as campus prepares a transition to virtual learning, with classes convening online beginning on Thursday, March 19, through Friday, April 3.
  • The College will make a decision regarding plans moving forward by Tuesday, March 31, at 4 p.m., based on how the situation unfolds.
  • Students will hear from professors regarding the specifics of each course’s remote operation, but should make sure they have access to their Wolf Den accounts. All online classes already scheduled will continue as normal.
  • All residential students must fill out this online form with the Office of Residence Life to determine the best course of action for each individual student.
  • Residential students may elect to go home if they are able to do so safely, and if doing so would not impede their ability to fulfill their academic responsibilities. In any event, residence halls, dining, academic support, and other limited services will be open and available for those who remain.
  • All structured student and campus activities have been canceled until further notice.
  • Newberry College and the South Atlantic Conference have canceled all athletic competitions and practices for the remainder of the 2019-20 academic year, including all spring conference championships.
  • Faculty and staff will continue to work on campus as normal.
  • More specific information regarding residence life, on-campus dining, or other campus services will be provided as necessary.
  • In all on-campus interactions the College encourages the practice of social distancing, in addition to other common-sense hygienic actions, to prevent the spread of germs. This involves
    • avoiding large gatherings
    • maintaining approximately six (6) feet of distance between individuals
    • no hugging or handshakes
    • avoiding unnecessary travel

 

Throughout the coming days, the College’s emergency response team will continue to monitor the situation, maintaining constant contact with the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (DHEC) and other health and safety officials. The College will regularly reassess the situation and decide the best course of action moving forward.

 

In the meantime, students, faculty, and staff should continue to monitor their official email accounts, this information page, and the College's COVID-19 frequently asked questions page for regular updates regarding College operations.

 

Newberry College recognizes the difficulties and inconveniences associated with this temporary change in operations. Thank you for your patience and prayers while we work to keep our campus community healthy and protected.

Wednesday, March 11

This message was sent via email to students.

 

Dear Students,

 

News of the spread of the Novel Coronavirus and the illness it causes, COVID-19, has become a growing concern for many over the last few weeks. We've heard how it is affecting people across the globe, whether through contraction of the illness itself, through imposed quarantines and travel restrictions, or for many here in our community, through simply having friends and loved ones affected or threatened by the illness' expansion. As an institution of higher education, we have a responsibility to be prepared for what may come our way, and to keep our community informed and updated throughout. Please read this entire message.

 

Let me begin by saying that the College is closely monitoring the situation, and as of today, there are no changes in College scheduling or operations. College administration is in constant contact with the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC), which is working closely with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). If there are any changes in College operations, we will notify you via email, social media, the College website, and other means as necessary. You can also find all published guidance and official communications related to coronavirus on our website, at https://www.newberry.edu/subpages/index/guidance-on-coronavirus. 

 

For now, let me offer some additional advice and updates regarding the prevention of illness and alarm here on campus.

 

First off, there is no reason to panic. Now is the time to simply watch, prepare for the potential, be mindful, and carry on.

 

That being said, you may notice some minor ongoing changes to service in the Kaufmann Dining Hall, including employee plate preparation on hot food lines, and we are encouraging all servers to wear gloves while handling food. I ask you to be patient and understanding in the course of this.

 

Physical plant and facilities personnel have also been asked to regularly sanitize all frequently touched surfaces across campus, such as doorknobs, focusing on high traffic areas.

 

These measures are out of an abundance of caution, as it is also flu season, and Newberry College is committed to ensuring that our students, faculty, and staff are healthy, safe, and able to learn, work, live, and play.

 

As has been said before, and as with any illness, you are encouraged to wash your hands often and avoid touching eyes, nose, or mouth with unwashed hands. Also, do not wear face masks. If you are well, the CDC does not recommend wearing a mask to prevent catching illness. If you are sick, they may help prevent the spread of germs, but they may also create undue alarm among your fellow students. If you are indeed unwell, notify your professors and coaches, do not go to class or practice, and call ahead before seeking medical attention.

 

Again, do not panic, and take common-sense preventive measures, as you would with the flu. Moving forward, please refer to the special coronavirus information page on our website for updates and previous communications on College operations.

 

In the meantime, have a productive remainder to your week.

 

Take care,

Morrie

Maurice W. Scherrens

President

Tuesday, March 10

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention announced Monday that it has confirmed two COVID-19 cases in South Carolina. One case is in Kershaw County, and one in Charleston County. The South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control is also investigating five presumptive positive cases.

 

Currently, no members of the Newberry College community have exhibited symptoms of COVID-19.

Sunday, March 8

This initial message was sent via email to students, faculty and staff.

 

The new coronavirus has dominated the news, along with confusion and misconceptions about the virus and the potential risks posed. Newberry College has prepared this update to dispel fear and rumors while protecting the campus community against the spread of disease. 


 
This message is not intended to be comprehensive and should not be considered medical or legal advice. 


 
Per the Centers for Disease Controlcoronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is a respiratory illness that can spread from person to person. The risk of getting COVID-19 in the United States is currently low, and there are presently no confirmed COVID-19 cases in South Carolina. Risk of infection with COVID-19 is higher for people who are close contacts of someone known to have COVID-19, such as healthcare workers, or household members. Other people at higher risk for infection are those who live in or have recently been in an area with ongoing spread of COVID-19. Click here for information related to confirmed cases in the United StatesClick here to view the CDC's coronavirus risk assessment by country. 


The virus is thought to spread mainly between people who are in close contact with one another (within about 6 feet) through respiratory droplets produced when an infected person coughs or sneezes. It also may be possible that a person can get COVID-19 by touching a surface or object that has the virus on it and then touching their own mouth, nose, or possibly their eyes, but this is not thought to be the main way the virus spreads. Diseases can make anyone sick regardless of their race or ethnicity.  
 
Patients with COVID-19 have had mild to severe respiratory illnesses with symptoms of 

  • fever 
  • cough 
  • shortness of breath 

 
There is currently no specific antiviral treatment for COVID-19, nor is there currently a preventive vaccine. The best protection against coronavirus, as with colds, the flu, and other contagious and respiratory illnesses, is with everyday preventive actions: 

  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick. 
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands. 
  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. Use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol if soap and water are not available. 
  • Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces, such as doorknobs, light switches, and keyboards before and after each use. 

 
If you are sick, with any illness, you should 

  • Notify the following individuals at the onset of symptoms: 
  • Students: Dr. Sandra Rouse, Dean of Students, Sandra.Rouse@newberry.edu, 803.321.5146 
  • Faculty: Dr. Sid Parrish, Vice President for Academic Affairs, Sid.Parrish@newberry.edu, 803.321.5263 
  • Staff: Bobbie Sides, Chief of Staff, Bobbie.Sides@newberry.edu, 803.321.5102 
  • Remember to also alert your professors and immediate supervisors when you anticipate being absent 
  • Stay home when you are sick. 
  • Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue, then throw the tissue in the trash. 
  • Clean and disinfect objects and surfaces, such as doorknobs, pillows and bed sheets, desks and countertops. 
  • Call ahead before you go to a doctor’s office or emergency room. Tell them about your recent travel and your symptoms. 

 
The CDC does not currently recommend the use of face masks by well individuals to prevent the spread of illness. 
 
Faculty and staff: alert administration to large increases in student, faculty, and staff absenteeism due to medical reasons. 
 
Newberry College will continue to monitor the situation over the coming weeks, and will notify you via email and RAVE alert system if there are any changes in College operations. 
 
In the meantime, remain calm. Regarding prevention, treat COVID-19 as you would the flu, taking similar common-sense preventive actions. Almost as equally important, do not stress. The key here is to simply prepare for the potential while carrying on as usual. 

 
Welcome back and have a great start to your week. 

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Database Specialist/Report Writer

Qualified Applicants

Qualified applicants must submit information requested in the job posting. Unless otherwise specified, review of applicants will continue until positions are filled.

Database Specialist/Report Writer

Job Summary:

This position assists in the planning, design, creation, and maintenance of simplex to complex reports and database projects. Responsibilities include responding to user requests, developing, testing and running reports to extract and share data contained across college data sources.

 

Required Education, Skills, and Abilities:

  • A bachelor’s degree in Information Technology or related field.
  • Proficient with Microsoft SQL Server query language (T-SQL)
  • Effectively interpret relational database designs
  • Proficient with SQL Server Management Studio
  • In depth knowledge of report writing tools such as SSRS (including Power BI and Report Builder)
  • Solid understanding of utilizing SQL for data analysis, report design, system analysis
  • Maintain and create views, stored procedures, functions, etc. to serve the purposes of the College
  • Ability to handle multiple complex reporting projects simultaneously
  • Flexibility to pause and produce an urgent ad-hoc report
  • Ability to write and provide documentation describing the behavior of existing or new queries/reports
  • Expertise using Microsoft Windows and common applications such as Outlook, Excel, etc.
  • Strong communication skills and customer service attitude.

 

Additional Preferred Skills:

  • Programming skills with C#.NET, VB.NET, HTML, CSS
  • Proficiency using Powershell
  • Comfort with tools such as Visual Studio, VS Code, Powershell ISE
  • Ability to dig deeper into system issues (Event Viewer, SQL Error logs, ...)
  • Organizational skills to maintain/improve IT procedural standards
  • Provide solutions using the best, or multiple, practical tool (C#, VB.NET, SQL, Powershell, etc)
  • Expertise in MSSQL object permissions and administration

 

Reporting Structure:

The position will report to the Director of Institutional Research and Effectiveness.

 

Application: 

Applicants should send a letter of interest, resume, and contact information for three professional references. Electronic application materials (preferred) should be emailed to hr@newberry.edu. Include "Database Specialist/Report Writer" in subject line.

Policy

These job descriptions reflect the general details considered necessary to describe the principal functions of the job identified and shall not necessarily be construed as a detailed description of all work requirements that may be inherent in the job. Job descriptions do not constitute an employment agreement or contract of employment, expressed or implied. Unless designated in writing and signed by the College President, all College employees are considered to be EMPLOYED AT WILL. Newberry College reserves the right to change, alter and amend job descriptions, functions and duties at the pleasure of the College President or Board of Trustees.

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Two Assistant Professors of Nursing:

Qualified Applicants

Qualified applicants must submit information requested in the job posting. Unless otherwise specified, review of applicants will continue until positions are filled.

Two Assistant Professors of Nursing:

Position Description:  Two experienced nurse educators needed to assume full-time nursing faculty duties in CCNE-accredited BSN program during academic year beginning in August 2020.

 

Duties and Responsibilities:  Expected to teach assigned courses and labs/clinicals based on faculty expertise, to advise students, and to participate in committee activities for the Department of Nursing and Newberry College. 

 

Qualifications: Earned Doctoral Degree in Nursing (preferred) or related field from a regionally accredited university, Master's Degree in Nursing (required), active license as an RN or APRN in SC (or other compact state), three years clinical practice as a professional nurse in an acute care setting, experience in incorporating simulation into the nursing curriculum; preference given for prior teaching experience in a pre-licensure baccalaureate program, recognized professional merit in nursing, and/or familiarity with the Neuman Systems Model.  Must meet the College criteria for faculty appointment and support the goals and mission of the College and the Department of Nursing.  Preference given to educators with experience in Critical Care Nursing, Adult Health Nursing, Obstetrics and/or Pharmacology.

 

Applications:  Review of applications will continue until position is filled.  Applications should send a letter of interest, CV, official graduate transcripts, and contact information for three professional references.  Electronic resume materials sent directly from the degree-granting institution(s) should be emailed to Associate Dean Dr. Christina Wendland at academic.applications@newberry.edu. Please include "Assistant Professor of Nursing" in the subject line.

Policy

These job descriptions reflect the general details considered necessary to describe the principal functions of the job identified and shall not necessarily be construed as a detailed description of all work requirements that may be inherent in the job. Job descriptions do not constitute an employment agreement or contract of employment, expressed or implied. Unless designated in writing and signed by the College President, all College employees are considered to be EMPLOYED AT WILL. Newberry College reserves the right to change, alter and amend job descriptions, functions and duties at the pleasure of the College President or Board of Trustees.

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Chemistry

Qualified Applicants

Qualified applicants must submit information requested in the job posting. Unless otherwise specified, review of applicants will continue until positions are filled.

Chemistry

Position Description:  Newberry College invites applications for a full-time tenure track faculty position as Assistant Professor of Chemistry beginning in August 2020.  Candidates need to have the education, skills and experience to teach a wide range of courses in Chemistry, such as analytical and physical chemistry.  Preferences given to applicants with experience and/or interest in teaching Forensic Chemistry.  The successful candidate should be able to engage students through personalized pedagogy to be active participants in their learning, help the students build confidence in their intellectual abilities, and develop alternate strategies to help students grasp the material.  Newberry College values innovative pedagogy and active learning activities both in the classroom and the associated laboratory.

 

Duties and Responsibilities:  The position includes 12 credit hours per semester of chemistry courses (lecture and lab), including General Chemistry (two semester sequence for science majors), and upper level courses.  The successful candidate will be an active member of the campus community which includes being widely available for student help, developing student support programs such as supplemental instruction, and serving on department & institutional committees.  

 

About Newberry College:  Founded in 1856 by the Lutheran Synod of South Carolina and Adjacent States, the College has maintained its association with the Lutheran Church. Today, Newberry College prepares students in the Lutheran liberal arts tradition through a supportive academic community for lifelong intellectual and personal development, meaningful vocation and engaged citizenship in the global society.

 

Newberry College is committed to the achievement of academic excellence by students from diverse backgrounds.  We are committed to giving all students opportunities for success through service and personal attention. The successful candidate will have intercultural competence and history of success mentoring students from diverse and underrepresented populations.

 

Qualifications:  An earned doctorate (PhD) degree in Chemistry. ABD will be considered.

 

Applications:  Review of applications will begin March 4th and continue until position is filled. Applicants should send a letter of interest and Curriculum Vitae, Teaching Philosophy, and contact information for three professional references. The successful candidate must submit to a background check and submit all official transcripts before beginning employment.  Electronic application materials should be emailed to Associate Dean, Dr. Christina Wendland (academic.application@newberry.edu). Please include “Chemistry Faculty” in the subject line.

 

Or mail hard copies to:

 

Dr. Christina Wendland

Associate Dean of Academic Affairs

Newberry College

2100 College Street

Newberry, SC 29108

Policy

These job descriptions reflect the general details considered necessary to describe the principal functions of the job identified and shall not necessarily be construed as a detailed description of all work requirements that may be inherent in the job. Job descriptions do not constitute an employment agreement or contract of employment, expressed or implied. Unless designated in writing and signed by the College President, all College employees are considered to be EMPLOYED AT WILL. Newberry College reserves the right to change, alter and amend job descriptions, functions and duties at the pleasure of the College President or Board of Trustees.

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Crime Fiction at Newberry

Partners in Crime

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Registered Nurse

Qualified Applicants

Qualified applicants must submit information requested in the job posting. Unless otherwise specified, review of applicants will continue until positions are filled.

Registered Nurse

Position Description: Provides services to assist students in taking responsibility for their own health.  Provides medical intervention and treatment for students in need of medical attention. Functions as a 12 month employee.

 

Qualifications: Maintain current advanced CPR certification. Provide and Maintain a current S.C. RN License Maintain professional dress, business casual with lab coat or medical scrubs in colors grey, black or red. Positive attitude. Ability to support the goals and mission of the college. Working knowledge of Microsoft Office software. Ability to build effective partnerships within the college community. Maintain a current SC Driver’s license. PPD (TB skin test). Hepatitis B vaccine. Preferred: Previous work experience within a medical office setting. Related experience of three or more years in a higher education setting.

 

Applications: Send resume, cover letter, and list 3 references to martha.dorrell@newberry.edu.  Please in “Registered Nurse” in the subject line.

Policy

These job descriptions reflect the general details considered necessary to describe the principal functions of the job identified and shall not necessarily be construed as a detailed description of all work requirements that may be inherent in the job. Job descriptions do not constitute an employment agreement or contract of employment, expressed or implied. Unless designated in writing and signed by the College President, all College employees are considered to be EMPLOYED AT WILL. Newberry College reserves the right to change, alter and amend job descriptions, functions and duties at the pleasure of the College President or Board of Trustees.

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FERPA for Parents and Student

FERPA for Parents and Student

The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) (20 U.S.C. § 1232g; 34 CFR Part 99) is a Federal law that protects the privacy of student education records. The law applies to all schools that receive funds under an applicable program of the U.S. Department of Education.

 

FERPA, in higher education, deals specifically with the education records of students who reach the age of 18 or who attend a post-secondary institution, affording them certain rights with respect to those records. Institutions may grant a student more rights than those guaranteed in the Act.

 

FERPA applies to students who are or have been in attendance, including those in cooperative and correspondence study.

 

Primary Rights Afforded to Students By FERPA:

  • Right to inspect and review the education records
  • Right to seek to have the records amended
  • Right to have some control over the disclosure of information from the records. 
  • Generally, schools must have written permission from the eligible student in order to release any information from a student's education record. However, FERPA allows schools to disclose those records, without consent, to the following parties or under the following conditions (34 CFR § 99.31):
    • School officials with legitimate educational interest;

    • Other schools to which a student is transferring;

    • Specified officials for audit or evaluation purposes;

    • Appropriate parties in connection with financial aid to a student;

    • Organizations conducting certain studies for or on behalf of the school;

    • Accrediting organizations;

    • To comply with a judicial order or lawfully issued subpoena;

    • Appropriate officials in cases of health and safety emergencies; and

    • State and local authorities, within a juvenile justice system, pursuant to specific State law.

Schools may disclose, without consent, "directory" information such as a student's name, address, telephone number, date and place of birth, honors and awards, email, and dates of attendance. However, schools must tell eligible students about directory information and allow eligible students a reasonable amount of time to request that the school not disclose directory information about them. 

Right to file complaints with:


U.S. Department of Education
Student Privacy Policy Office
400 Maryland Ave, SW
Washington, DC 20202-8520
 
or

FERPA.Complaints@ed.gov

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Vice President for Administrative Services/Chief Financial Officer

Qualified Applicants

Qualified applicants must submit information requested in the job posting. Unless otherwise specified, review of applicants will continue until positions are filled.

Vice President for Administrative Services/Chief Financial Officer

Newberry College seeks a Vice President for Administrative Services/CFO who is an experienced financial professional to oversee all aspects of the finance and business functions of the College. This position exists to be an enabler or supporter for other administrators and department heads, helping them determine how to accomplish the objectives and thereby providing a supportive foundation for organizational success. The Vice President reports to the College President and is an integral member of the President's Council. The position requires a combination of strategic leadership and hands-on management. 

 

Founded in 1856 by the Lutheran Synod of South Carolina and Adjacent States, the College has maintained its association with the Lutheran Church. Today, Newberry College prepares students in the Lutheran liberal arts tradition through a supportive academic community for lifelong intellectual and personal development, meaningful vocation and engaged citizenship in the global society. Newberry College is committed to the achievement of academic excellence by students from diverse backgrounds. Fifty percent of our students are Pell Grant recipients; forty percent of our students are first-generation college students; and thirty-five percent of our students are students of color. Our students make us who we are, and we are seeking someone committed to the service and personal attention for all our students. 

 

The Vice President of Administrative Services/Chief Financial Officer (CFO) provides management and leadership for the administrative functions of the College. The CFO assumes overall responsibility for the College's financial, general accounting, procurement, accounts payable and receivable, student accounts, debt management, capital financing, investments and budgeting. 

 

The CFO establishes and updates the College's financial policies and standards. The CFO further oversees the planning, direction and administration of the College's support functions which include Human Resources, Environmental Health and Safety and outsourced functions include Dining Services, Facilities Management, Bookstore functions, Property and Health Insurance. The CFO should have a thorough knowledge of the relationship between tuition discounting, access and affordability, student accounts receivable and the net income requirement per student. 

 

This position requires the following: 

· Master’s degree in accounting, business or related field 

· Five to seven years of experience in a supervisory role in a college business office or combination of education and experience commensurate with the requirement of this position 

· Demonstrated ability to work cooperatively and collaboratively with college faculty, staff, administrators and the board of trustees 

· Experience in operational and strategic planning, policy development and financial analysis 

· Ability to effectively communicate ideas and information in a written and oral format to administrative staff, professional colleagues, governing boards, and the general public in large or small group settings 

 

Newberry College is in a period of significant growth in enrollment (24% over the last 5 years). The CFO will be a visionary partner in managing the physical plant to support this growth. This includes planning and delivering improved learning environments and residential spaces, student-focused spaces, and dining venues. 

 

This position requires a background screen. We reserve the right to make employment contingent upon successful completion of a background screen. 

 

This is a regular, full-time, exempt position reporting to the President of the College. 

 

Evening, travel and occasional weekend hours are expected. 

 

For complete consideration, applicants should submit complete application by March 15, 2020. Application should include a cover letter explaining candidate's interest in the position; resume covering the applicant's complete employment history; and a minimum of four (4) professional references including phone number and email address. 

The salary for this position will be competitive and commensurate with the qualifications of the candidate. 

The preferred method for submitting your application materials is via hr@newberry.edu.

Policy

These job descriptions reflect the general details considered necessary to describe the principal functions of the job identified and shall not necessarily be construed as a detailed description of all work requirements that may be inherent in the job. Job descriptions do not constitute an employment agreement or contract of employment, expressed or implied. Unless designated in writing and signed by the College President, all College employees are considered to be EMPLOYED AT WILL. Newberry College reserves the right to change, alter and amend job descriptions, functions and duties at the pleasure of the College President or Board of Trustees.

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Pearson Hall

Pearson Hall

Pricing

Double 

Yearly - $7,500

 

Single

Yearly - $8,050

 

2020-2021 room rates (based on 10-month occupancy).

 

Outside, three story brick building with several students talking

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Residence Hall Director

Qualified Applicants

Qualified applicants must submit information requested in the job posting. Unless otherwise specified, review of applicants will continue until positions are filled.

Residence Hall Director

Walker Hall, Pearson Hall and Oakland Mill

 

Position Description

Residence Hall Director for Oakland Mill, Pearson and Walker Halls, responsible for implementing a comprehensive residential program to facilitate student engagement in educational opportunities designed to build community and citizenship; support for student well-being and success; and meaningful connections with the academic community.

 

Departmental Duties:

Recruit, hire, supervise, train and mentor the Resident Assistant staff.
Coordinate and be present for opening and closing of halls to include room inspections.
Develop comprehensive programming plans designed to meet the needs of the specific halls.
Work with facilities management to maintain residence halls and to plan for future enhancements and renovations.
Maintain housing information in Jenzabar, both data entry and reporting.
Perform on-call duties as required including a rotating duty schedule.
Assist, as needed, in crisis and emergency situations.
Work with Residence Life to manage housing assignments and to develop relevant and timely residence life policies.
Other duties as assigned.

 

Student Development:

Serve as mentor for students providing guidance and referrals as needed.
Foster community within the Halls, mediating and facilitating as needed.
Conduct disciplinary counseling and judicial hearings for violations of Residence Life policies and/or the Newberry College Student Code of Conduct.
Serve as a student advocate and educator; available and accessible to students on a scheduled and non-scheduled basis.
Submit Early Alerts for students who may be retention risks
Actively participate in the First Year Experience Program as requested by the Dean.
Other duties as assigned.

 

Campus-Wide Responsibilities:

Serve on the Student Affairs Leadership Team and play an integral role in planning campus programs with faculty, staff, coaches and other campus departments such as:  Summer Orientation, Homecoming, Family Weekend, student organization leadership training, and other events unique to Newberry College.
As a live-in employee, it is expected that interaction will take place at college activities and in the dining hall on a regular basis.
Maintain current on SACS criteria and perform regular assessment activities to ensure compliance and that best-practices are being employed.


Other duties as assigned.

Requirements: Bachelor's degree required. Master's degree in Student Affairs or related field or 1-2 years of experience preferred. Must possess excellent organizational and communication skills. Must be proficient with Microsoft Office. Must be able to multi-task effectively. Working knowledge of college student development theory and a strong commitment to the enhancement of the intellectual, cultural, social, physical and moral development of students. Maintain high professional standards and attitude of customer services.

 

To apply send a resume and cover letter to HR@newberry.edu

Policy

This job description reflects the general details considered necessary to describe the principal functions of the job identified and shall not necessarily be construed as a detailed description of all work requirements that may be inherent in the job. Job descriptions do not constitute an employment agreement or contract of employment, expressed or implied. Unless designated in writing and signed by the College President, all College employees are considered to be" EMPLOYED AT WILL". Newberry College reserves the right to change, alter and amend job descriptions, functions and duties at the pleasure of the College President or Board of Trustees.

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Director of Advancement Services

Qualified Applicants

Qualified applicants must submit information requested in the job posting. Unless otherwise specified, review of applicants will continue until positions are filled.

Director of Advancement Services

Position Description: 
This position provides leadership, direction, strategy, supervision and coordination for the Advancement office daily operations – its staff and programs; including: alumni and donor records management and maintenance, gift processing, and receipting; list generation and giving reports.

Essential Duties:

Leadership

Provide oversight and direction for the Advancement Services area. Guides, and directs staff through training, processing, and handling data and supervising the Associate Director of Advancement Services (Data and Scholarship Coordinator).
Using independent judgment and discretion, plans; budgets resources; formulates policy; develops procedures, and provides direction in the daily operations.
At the direction of the VP, serves as primary contact for regular operational purposes with other campus offices.
Create and maintain formal documentation of Advancement operating/gift acceptance policies and procedures.

 

Database-Donor Records Management

Create and administer Jenzabar database reports to address advancement needs. Must be willing to learn new Jenzabar modules and be willing to cross train others.
Supervise the preparation of donor receipt letters, donor letters and recognition letters, and related correspondence. Create giving or data reports.
Working with the Advancement team, construct the necessary lists, reports and tracking tools to support fundraising efforts including data/benchmarking.
Serve as the check-point for quality control for all records, reports, lists and data.

 

Collaboration and Customer Service

Oversee Advancement Services participation in the annual audit – calling on others on the Advancement team as needed for documentation and reports, and serve as needed in the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges (SACS-COC) accreditation process.
Develops and maintains very positive and professional customer service attitude.

 

Knowledge, Skills, Abilities (KSA's) required

Must possess good communication, writing, and proof reading skills. Knowledge of office methods, procedures, practices, and bookkeeping/accounting and proven success in budget management. Ability to quickly learn, interpret and apply a variety of policies and procedures with their respect to the College. Computer skills in database management, word processing and spreadsheets Ability to manage multiple tasks.

 

Required Education: 
Bachelor’s Degree.

Experience:
Preferred experience in Advancement/Development in higher education office or overall database administration experience. Jenzabar experience preferred. Experience using word processing, database, and spreadsheet software.
 

Salary commensurate with experience

To apply send a resume and cover letter to HR@newberry.edu

Policy

This job description reflects the general details considered necessary to describe the principal functions of the job identified and shall not necessarily be construed as a detailed description of all work requirements that may be inherent in the job. Job descriptions do not constitute an employment agreement or contract of employment, expressed or implied. Unless designated in writing and signed by the College President, all College employees are considered to be" EMPLOYED AT WILL". Newberry College reserves the right to change, alter and amend job descriptions, functions and duties at the pleasure of the College President or Board of Trustees.

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Assistant Vice President for Institutional Advancement

Qualified Applicants

Qualified applicants must submit information requested in the job posting. Unless otherwise specified, review of applicants will continue until positions are filled.

Assistant Vice President for Institutional Advancement

Position Summary:  Reporting to the Vice President of Institutional Advancement, the AVP for Institutional Advancement has primary responsibility for cultivating, soliciting, and stewarding a portfolio of current and potential individual donors with the capacity of making major gifts of $10,000 and above.  Newberry College has launched a $35M capital campaign, emphasis will be on funding campaign priorities, which include the annual fund and capital projects.

 

Duties and Responsibilities:

Conduct face-to-face meetings for the purposes of cultivating, soliciting, and stewarding an assigned portfolio of approximately 120+ current and prospective major donors.
Follow up all donor or prospective contacts with meticulous, thoughtful, and appropriate correspondence and maintain internal record-keeping as defined by office protocols.
Work collaboratively with other members of the Advancement team to identify, cultivate, research and solicit prospective and current donors.
Prepare proposals for gift solicitations for the President and the VP for Advancement.
Prepare written briefings for senior management and faculty visits with individual donor and prospective donors, as well as corporations and foundations, maintain follow-up documentation and correspondence.
Work cooperatively with other faculty and staff in expanding the pool of prospective donors and in coordinating solicitation strategies and campaign activities.

 

Qualifications:  The successful candidate for this position must be a results-driven, team player and should be a self-starter, strategic thinker whose hallmark qualities include the ability to listen carefully, a commitment to liberal arts education, exceptional communications skills, and the ability to relate comfortably with people of diverse profiles and backgrounds and be accountable.  Proven ability to cultivate and close major and deferred gifts is a central qualification. Travel is essential and is primarily regional.

 Minimum Level of Education Required:  Bachelor’s degree.  (Master’s degree-preferred).

 Minimum Level of Experience Required: 7-10 years of experience in fundraising, financial services, marketing/sales, or related experience.

 

Application:  Send cover letter, resume and contact information for three professional references to HR@newberry.edu.  Please include “AVP IA” in the subject line.

 

Salary commensurate with experience

Policy

Thise job description reflects the general details considered necessary to describe the principal functions of the job identified and shall not necessarily be construed as a detailed description of all work requirements that may be inherent in the job. Job descriptions do not constitute an employment agreement or contract of employment, expressed or implied. Unless designated in writing and signed by the College President, all College employees are considered to be" EMPLOYED AT WILL". Newberry College reserves the right to change, alter and amend job descriptions, functions and duties at the pleasure of the College President or Board of Trustees.

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Prospective Music Students

A Comprehensive Musical Foundation

The Newberry College Department of Music offers a supportive, student-centered community that provides students with a comprehensive musical foundation. The Music department faculty and staff support students in developing their musicianship, creativity, critical thinking, leadership and personal growth through instruction, performance, scholarship and service. Our majors and concentrations allow students to tailor their degree program to their unique career pursuits and personal interests.

 

Nationally accredited though the National Association of Schools of Music (NASM), the department offers personalized instruction with an outstanding faculty of active performers who are also experienced teachers, we ensure that every student receives the personalized, attentive instruction essential to developing one's musical talent to the fullest. 

 

Our graduates include professional performers, music industry business professionals and choral and instrumental music educators who are leading successful school music programs throughout the region. Newberry Music alumni also have earned graduate degrees in programs throughout the United States.

 

Click here for more information about audition requirements, audition dates and how to schedule your audition.  

Music Major for a Day

​The Department of Music invites prospective students and families to spend a day on campus to learn more about college life for music students at Newberry. This event is open to all current high school juniors and seniors who are interested in pursuing a music degree in college. 

Click here to learn more about the Music Major for a Day program

How to Apply

Apply as a Music Major

All high school seniors applying as a music major at Newberry College must complete the following steps:

Schedule an Audition

In addition to completing an application for admission to Newberry College, students seeking admission to the Department of Music as a music major must audition. Auditioning for admission as a music major ensures that you will be considered for all Department of Music scholarship opportunities.

Click here for more information about audition requirements, audition dates and how to schedule your audition

Music Scholarships

The Department of Music offers dedicated scholarships for music majors, ensemble participation scholarships for all students regardless of major, and the Music Achievement Award scholarships for students who auditioned into an All-State or All-Region honors ensembles in high school.

Click here for details about music scholarship opportunities.

Ensembles

Newberry College offers all students, whatever their major, the opportunity to continue performing in college as a member of one of our music ensembles. Many of our ensembles present annual concert tours across the region, regularly appear at regional and national conferences, and  have been featured with professional orchestras at acclaimed venues. Ensemble participation is open to all students on campus and participation scholarships are available.

Click here to learn more about the variety of vocal and instrumental ensembles available at Newberry College

Schedule a Personal Visit

One of the best ways to decide if the Music program at Newberry College is right for you is to experience it! We encourage you to join us for our Music Major for a Day event in the fall or schedule a personal visit whenever it's convenient for you and your family. You'll have the opportunity to spend time on campus, learn about our programs and faculty and tour our facilities. For more information about scheduling a personal visit to campus, contact Music department chair Dr. Chris Sheppard at chris.sheppard@newberry.edu

Events & Calendar

Want to experience other Music events at Newberry?

Click here to view our performance calendar and other special events.

Music Performance Honors Program

The Music Performance Honors Program recognizes outstanding student musicians who are NOT pursuing the Music in Performance major, but who are capable of performing at that level and who wish to complete the additional requirements for Performance majors. 

Click here to learn more about the Music Performance Honors Program

Music Student Handbook

Combined with the support you receive from Music department faculty and staff, this handbook will provide you with information about department policies and procedures, important forms, advising, information about juries and recitals and much more.

Click here to view the Music Student Handbook

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Music Performance Honors

Music Performance Honors Program

The Music Performance Honors Program recognizes outstanding student musicicans who NOT pursuing the Music in Performance major, but who are capable of performing at that level and who wish to complete the additional requirements for Performance majors. Participation in the Music Performance Honors Program will:

  • Prepare students not enrolled in the Music in Performance program to audition for graduate degree programs in Music Performance should they wish to do so.
  • Equip students with additional performance education and experience without additional academic coursework. When combined with a Bachelor of Art's in Music degree or a Bachelor of Music Education degree, the increase in credit hours is minimal. 
  • Provide students with recognition for Music Performance Honors status on their official student transcripts. 

 

Honors Program Requirements

  • 24 hours of private lessons
  • MUA 380 (half-hour recital - 1 hour)
  • MUA 480 (hour recital - 2 hours)
  • 4 semesters of chamber music on the student's major instrument (0-1 hour each)

 

Honors Program Admission Criteria

Students must earn an average of 80 points on the Sophomore Barrier Performance Evaluation Rubric in order to begin the program honors program. Students must meet the same performance standards as Bachelor of Music in Performance majors. .

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Music Scholarships

Music Excellence Award

Students who audition to become a music major are eligible for the Music Excellence Award. This scholarship is renewable for each year the student is a music major and remains in good academic standing. 

Ensemble and Marching Band Participation Scholarship

Students who participate in a large ensemble (wind ensemble, marching band, orchestra or choir) are eligible for participation scholarships that increase each year they are in the ensemble. These scholarships are open to all Newberry College students participating in a large ensemble. The Participation Scholarship is available to music majors participating in a large ensemble that is NOT required in their degree program. Students are eligible to receive one participation scholarship each semester. 

 

1st year  =  $1,000

2nd year  =  $1,500

3rd year  =  $2,000

4th year  =  $2,500

Music Achievement Scholarship

Students from any campus major who auditioned into All-State and All-Region ensembles during their high school years are eligible for the Newberry College Music Achievement Scholarship. To qualify, students must enroll in their corresponding ensemble each semester they are a student at Newberry. This award is not stackable with the Music Excellence Award nor with any Academic scholarship awarded by Newberry College. Students may only receive one Music Achievement Scholarship per academic year.

 

All-State Chorus, Band, Orchestra, or Jazz Band  =  $14,000/year

All-Region Band or Orchestra  =  $13,000/year

 

Click here for more information about scholarships, grants, loans and awards available at Newberry College

Dr. Sally Cherrington-Beggs Memorial Scholarship

The Dr. Sally Cherrington Beggs Memorial Scholarship was established to honor the memory of Dr. Sally Cherrington-Beggs, who was a dedicated Newberry College music professor for 12 years. A talented professor, leader and performer, she was passionate about the integration of music into the worship experience. The Dr. Sally Cherrington-Beggs Memorial Scholarship is intended to honor her memory and to promote the cultivation of promising organists/musicians who are dedicated to using their talents to enrich the worship life of the Church.

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Commencement Graduates

List of Newberry College Graduates

Spring 2019

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College Talk Tour

Featuring Newberry College President Dr. Maurice Scherrens

We're hitting the road to meet up with our student families, alumni and friends and share some of the exciting developments happening at Newberry College. This is your opportunity to hear from President Scherrens and other campus leaders about what's new at Newberry and what's on the horizon. Join us for the Tour -- complete with refreshments -- at any of these locations below. We look forward to seeing you soon!

College Talk Tour Locations

CHARLESTON, SC

Wednesday, March 6

6:30 - 7:30 pm

Aloft Charleston Airport & Convention Center, 4875 Tanger Outlet Blvd., North Charleston, SC 29418

 

COLUMBIA, SC

Tuesday, March 19

6:30 - 7:30 pm

Aloft Columbia - Harbison, 217 Landeau Ct., Columbia, SC 29212

 

NEWBERRY, SC

Tuesday, March 26

6:30 - 7:30 pm

Newberry Firehouse Conference Center, 1227 McKibben Street, Newberry SC 29108

Registration

CLICK TO REGISTER

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Bridge to Big Ideas

Program Dates

June 8 — June 19, 2020

About the Program

The Newberry College Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences offers a two-week summer seminar for rising high school seniors. The program is designed to provide students with an intellectually rigorous college-style experience, enhance critical thinking and writing skills, and promote engaged citizenship. 

  • Receive individual attention and support in small classes taught by Newberry College professors
  • Get real college experience taking classes on the Newberry College campus, eating in the college Cafe and utilizing campus amenities.
  • Gain college skills in reading, writing, critical thinking and analysis.
  • Make college connections with support from student mentors and professors, while producing college level writing samples.

Daily Schedule

Monday- Friday, 9 am - 3 pm

  • Meet with Newberry College student mentors for questions about the day’s assignments.

  • Attend a two-hour seminar with Newberry College professors.

  • After a short break, meet with student mentors to discuss readings and assignments for the following day.

  • Enjoy lunch in the college cafe or catered meals.

  • Reading time and activity, such as field trips to interesting sites in Newberry, or other recreational activities

Who Should Apply

All rising seniors should consider applying! We especially encourage students to apply who may not be certain whether they can, or want, o attend college but have an interest in learning and in their ability to grow.

Materials & Cost

This program is FREE to all students who are accepted to participate in the program.

 

Acceptance into this program provides you with the following at NO cost to the participant: 

  • Daily instruction and facilitated discussion

  • All course books and materials

  • Daily lunch either in the Cafe or catered

  • Access to student mentors during the program and the following school year

How To Apply

APPLICATION DEADLINE IS APRIL 20, 2020

 

Click here TO DOWNLOAD THE APPLICATION.

Click here TO SUBMIT YOUR COMPLETED APPLICATION. 

Questions?

Send questions about the Bridge to Big Ideas program to:

 

Naomi Simmons, Program Coordinator

naomi.simmons@newberry.edu 

OR

Joe McDonald, Program Associate

joseph.mcdonald@newberry.edu

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Devotions for Advent 2019

About Our Devotions

Advent is the church season that prepares us to remember the Christ child of Christmas Day, and the Redeemer Christ who has paid the price for our sins and who will return to bring us home. These devotions are written by members of the Newberry College community, and may be heard on WKDK-AM 1240 at 9:06 a.m. each Sunday through Friday through Dec. 25.

Day 25

By Bishop Kevin L. Strickland ‘04


“In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God. He was in the beginning with God. All things came into being through him, and without him not one thing came into being. What has come into being in him was life, and the life was the light of all people. The light shines in the darkness, and the darkness did not overcome it.

 

There was a man sent from God, whose name was John. He came as a witness to testify to the light, so that all might believe through him. He himself was not the light, but he came to testify to the light. The true light, which enlightens everyone, was coming into the world.


He was in the world, and the world came into being through him; yet the world did not know him. He came to what was his own, and his own people did not accept him. But to all who received him, who believed in his name, he gave power to become children of God, who were born, not of blood or of the will of the flesh or of the will of man, but of God.

 

And the Word became flesh and lived among us, and we have seen his glory, the glory as of a father’s only son, full of grace and truth.” John 1:1-14 (NRSV)

 

Merry Christmas!

 

John’s Gospel doesn’t invite us into a stable or backyard barn or an inn, filled with cattle and groaning birth pangs of Mary, with Joseph by her side, birthing into being the Christ child.


No, John’s beginning reminds us that beginnings might be hard for humans, but not for God. “In the beginning was the Word.” John invites us into the whimsical and fleshy poetry of beginnings that transcend us from his pages to hear how God refashions chaos into order. This lyrical hymn celebrates the beginning of life, but this time in a way that will not be violated, as happened after God sang the world into being at creation.


John’s Christmas message, if you will, invites us to enter the story, not only of John’s telling, but how we are part of its pages. We are those whose beginnings are birthed in this God who loved so intently, even to dwell among us. I, like many of you, love the sweetness that comes from the pictures we are given from the birth of Jesus in silent nights, mangers, animals crooning, and angels singing. But to hear John’s Christmas message, it invites us to see that from the beginning of creation and every beginning after - even the beginnings which are hard - we have a God who in-fleshes God’s self to come among us. We are told that, “And the Word became flesh and lived among us, and we have seen his glory, the glory as of a father’s only son, full of grace and truth.”


As friend of mine put it in this way: This is the good news that greets us on Christmas Day. The Word, dwelling among us, is poured out all over our daily lives. Just as households can’t sustain Christmas morning celebrations every day, our minds cannot wake up each day and behold the farthest reaches of space, the tiniest cell, the depths of the ocean. Christ reigns over the mysteries of the cosmos nonetheless, yet Christ also comes into the chinks and shadows and dusty corners of life. Christ comes to piles of laundry, sinks full of dishes, and exhausted hosts. Christ also comes into neighborhoods where no one is feasting today, where no one awoke to gifts, where peace is rarely spoken.


For John, God in becoming flesh in Jesus has committed God’s self not only to revealing what God’s grace looks like, but that God wants us to know it and feel it as well.


Dear ones, claimed and clothed in baptism by the Lord of the light, we carry the light of peace around with us before we even awake to it. From your beginnings to your endings, may you know the full embodiment of God’s grace, may you be able to see, touch, feel, smell, live that incarnate reality in others and may they receive that from you as well.


Merry Christ-Mass!


We give you thanks God for coming among us, taking up residence, moving into our neighborhoods and filling our whole lives with your presence. May the indwelling of your love, fill us in this season and throughout our days, to be that very presence to all the world. In the name of your son, Jesus Christ, we pray. Amen.


The Rev. Kevin L. Strickland ’04 is the fourth bishop of the Southeastern Synod of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America.
 

Day 24

By Christopher Harris

 

“When the angles had left them and gone into heaven, the shepherds said to one another, ‘Let’s go to Bethlehem and see this thing that has happened, which the Lord has told us about.’ So, they hurried off and found Mary and Joseph, and the baby, who was lying in the manger. When they had seen him, they spread the word concerning what had been told to them about this child, and all who heard it were amazed at what the shepherds told them. But Mary treasured up all these things and pondered them in her heart. The shepherds returned, glorifying and praising God for all the things they had heard and seen, which were just as they had been told.” Luke 2:15-20


These passages are the about the first Christmas celebration, where we learned that the angels had told the shepherds about this amazing thing that had happened. God gave us Jesus Christ, His one and only Son, to redeem us from sin and give us eternal life. Once the shepherds laid eyes on the baby swaddled in a manger, the shepherds knew that what they were told by the angels was real. The angels told them to tell everyone of what they saw and experienced … and they did. They spread the good word far and wide that God’s plan and God’s love is something real, tangible, and everlasting. On this Christmas Eve, we are reminded that the love God has for us is something we cannot truly comprehend, but, we have an opportunity to feel His grace.


This Christmas celebration of the birth of Jesus Christ also allows us to pause and reflect upon our own daily lives as still another year has passed. During this time of year, we spend time with family, cherishing our moments together and we lift up those who are suffering, so that they, too, may remember the humanity that is inside all of us. While we may not attend church every day, every week, or ever attend at all, our core principles of life are to love one another and to live our lives in a way that is meaningful not just for yourself, but for others. God gave us His only Son, not just to save us, but for us to understand that life is not only about us. Your life is a vehicle to serve others, to find your purpose, and to change the world. As we celebrate the birth of Christ, let’s move forward and find our purpose, serve others and change the world.


Would you pray with me: Dear Heavenly Father, today on this Christmas Eve, the world is full of promise and love knowing that you sent us your Son, Jesus. This eve we are reminded that when He was born everything changed and we remain amazed by your plan, the love you have for your people, and the grace you have granted us. May we remember those who need us the most, may we remember those who have gone before us, and may we live our lives serving others and changing the world. As we celebrate the birth of our Savior Jesus Christ, and await His return, we give thanks and praise to you. Amen.


Christopher Harris serves as dean of enrollment management.
 

Day 23

By Drs. Maurice and Sandy Scherrens

 

“And there were shepherds living out in the fields nearby, keeping watch over their flocks at night. An angel of the Lord appeared to them, and they were terrified. But the angel said to them, ‘Do not be afraid. I bring you good news. Today a Savior has been born to you; he is the Messiah. You will find a baby lying in a manger.’ Suddenly a great company of the heavenly host appeared saying ‘Glory to God in the highest and on earth peace and good will toward men.’”  Luke 2: 8-14
 

Let’s take a look at some of these words. For instance, what is a “heavenly host?” Well, the answer is, a heavenly host is an army of angels. So, the birth of Christ is not being announced by a couple of angels who just happen to be flying by; this birth was announced by a “great company of heavenly hosts.”


Imagine you are one of those shepherds just minding your own business, tending to your flock, when all of a sudden an angel accompanied by another hundred or so of her buddies lights up the sky, shouting at you, “don’t be afraid.” Despite the words from this well-intentioned angel, your fear level is off the charts. Right?


The lead angel doesn’t announce, “a baby has been born,” because that kind of routine news could have easily been shared with you via the phone, email or text message. Instead, the angel tells you the “Savior has been born to you.” You ask yourself, ‘what is a Savior?’ Fortunately, you are one of the more technologically savvy shepherds, so you look up the word “Savior” on your iPhone and read that it means “protector from danger and deliverer of salvation.” You know, it hasn’t been all that great of a year and you could use a break, so you start believing this could be your lucky night.


But then the angel throws you a curve … the Savior is “lying in a manger.” A manger? Since you have never heard of that word either, you pull out your iPhone again and discover that a manger is “a long, open trough typically found in a stable or a barn and is used for the feeding of horses and cows. “Savior and manger?” This story is starting to fall apart. But…


You want to believe, so you continue your search about “mangers,” and you discover that the word “manger” comes from the French and Latin words meaning “to eat or to chew.” Umm. As you sit deep in thought, a bell goes off in your brain and everything makes sense all-of-a-sudden.


The Savior is born in a stable – our first lesson on humility. The Savior is telling us that humility is the key to happiness. Lying in a manger – the Savior is telling us that He is our source of nourishment. The Savior is sending us a message on Day One.


“Whenever and wherever you look for me, you will find a manger. No matter how desperate the circumstances, how choppy the waters or how turbulent the air, I am with you. Be not a stranger; for there is no danger; not here in my manger.”
 

Merry Christmas.
Sandy & Morrie Scherrens

 

Dr. Maurice Scherrens is president of Newberry College, and Dr. Sandy Scherrens is associate dean for student success.
 

Day 22

By R. Annie Worman

 

“In those days Caesar Augustus issued a decree that a census should be taken of the entire Roman world. (This was the first census that took place while Quirinius was governor of Syria.) And everyone went to their own town to register.
So Joseph also went up from the town of Nazareth in Galilee to Judea, to Bethlehem the town of David, because he belonged to the house and line of David. He went there to register with Mary, who was pledged to be married to him and was expecting a child. While they were there, the time came for the baby to be born, and she gave birth to her firstborn, a son. She wrapped him in cloths and placed him in a manger, because there was no guest room available for them.”

Luke 2:1-7 (NIV)
 

Wow! It is the Twenty-second of December already! Are you like me, wondering where the month of December went? Are you like me, making lists and crossing out the things that are just not going to get done this year? Are you like me, planning that wonderful Christmas dinner with the family?


I know some of you are, and some of you are not counting the days but counting the dollars. Some of you are worried about the weather and travel conditions. Some of you are feeling despair and sorrow and grief that your beloved loved one or ones will not be with you this Christmas. Some of you will be spending Christmas far away from your families. As a retired Navy Officer and a retired Navy Chaplain’s wife, I can understand some of those feelings. I have felt some of what you may be feeling. I have missed my family many, many Christmases.


And the very first Christmas, did Mary miss her mother and aunties and perhaps sisters as she labored and bore her firstborn? Wouldn’t Joseph have wished for a woman to help his betrothed during labor and delivery? That is the human thing, to be in relationships.


When we were thousands of miles from our siblings and parents, beloved Ernie and I sometimes had our own little wonderful family celebrations but as often as we could, we gathered with other lonely friends and lonely little families to worship and sing Christmas songs and play cards or just gather around and talk and have fellowship. With hugs and smiles and conversation and Merry Christmas in three or four different languages, somehow the distance from family didn’t feel so far with friends gathered around.


To those of you with family close, hold them close. To those of you with family far away, hold friends close. The gift of the birth of Jesus the Christ is the gift of grace and forgiveness and love. Love one another this year.


Please pray with me: Lord God, thank you for the gift of your son, Jesus, sent to us to take away our sins. Lord God, thank you for loving us so very much and thank you for sending your Holy Spirit to comfort us in our low times. Help us to keep the spirit of Christmas alive in our hearts and minds every day of the year. Amen.
 

R. Annie Worman is the beloved spouse of Campus Pastor Ernie Worman.
 

Day 21

By the Rev. H. Julian Gordy

 

“And you, child, will be called the prophet of the Most High; for you will go before the Lord to prepare his ways, to give knowledge of salvation to his people by the forgiveness of their sins. By the tender mercy of our God, the dawn from on high will break upon us, to give light to those who sit in darkness and in the shadow of death, to guide our feet into the way of peace.”

Luke 1:76-79 (Full passage: Luke 1:67-80)


Among those who observe the canonical hours of the church, the Song of Zechariah – today’s reading from the first chapter of Luke’s gospel - is sung at the beginning of every morning. This poem was Zechariah’s response to the birth of his son John, and is a song of hope for the future. Nothing could be more appropriate to start a day than this word of hope.


It is an especially good word for today, the shortest day of the year, when the hours of darkness are far longer than the hours of light. And it is a good word for our world in which we have experienced our share of darkness lately - gridlock in Washington, division in our communities and families, famine, floods, oppression, 68 million people displaced from their homes by poverty or violence, hard-heartedness in high places – you know the list. It is the news of every day. Add to that the personal struggles that many of us face, and maybe some of us have begun to wonder if there is hope of if the future will stretch on and on into the darkness.


The message of Zechariah is a message of hope. There is a light shining even in our darkness, a light that cannot be overcome by any darkness. That light - the light of Christ - is shining in the dark world now. Whenever we forget about ourselves and reach out in Jesus’s name to our neighbor, we give witness to that light. Light and hope are here in the world now. And we are called, like John, to give witness to that light and to that hope that is in us.

 

God of hope, shine the light Christ in our hearts that we may bear the word of hope to the world. Amen.

 

The Rev. H. Julian Gordy, is bishop emeritus of the Southeastern Synod of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America.
 

Day 20

By Dr. Warren Moore


“For the grace of God that bringeth salvation hath appeared to all men, Teaching us that, denying ungodliness and worldly lusts, we should live soberly, righteously, and godly, in this present world; Looking for that blessed hope, and the glorious appearing of the great God and our Saviour Jesus Christ; Who gave himself for us, that he might redeem us from all iniquity, and purify unto himself a peculiar people, zealous of good works.”

Titus 2:11-14 (KJV)


These days, when we use the word peculiar, we mean “quaint,” “odd,” or even “weird.” But that wasn’t always the case. When the folks who translated the King James Version were at work, the word meant something belonging only to one person.

 

That makes sense here – the epistle’s author reminds us that God came to us as Christ in order to bring us to Him, to be his and only his. But I think that in our world these days, the modern meaning of peculiar applies as well. Even during this season in which we prepare for the coming of the Lord, it is easy to get distracted from this time’s – and our – true purpose. To remain focused as we should be is unusual. Perhaps even. . . peculiar. But sometimes, the odd choice is the best one.

 

Heavenly Father, thank You for calling us to be Yours and Yours alone and truly. Grant us the zeal to hear You, even when it makes us odd. We ask this in the Name of Your Son. Amen.
 

Dr. Warren Moore serves as professor of English.
 

Day 19

By Gerald Seals


God Has Room in His Heart for You!


“For you answer our prayers. All of us must come to you.”

Psalm 65:2 (NLT)
 

Each of us, I think it accurate to say, has experienced that feeling of “no one is there to listen to me; no one is available to provide me wise counsel!” Loneliness is an emotion that, when it occurs, occurs as an overshadowing presence that isolates and sequesters, an embracing presence that one is hard pressed to disabuse oneself of or shed or let go. Loneliness shows up in interesting manifestations; for example:

 

  • Young people sometimes complain that their parents won’t listen to them;
  • Spouses may say their spouses don’t listen;
  • It seems at times, no one will listen to our questions or ideas about anything.

 

Loneliness not only manifests, but seems to take over upon the arrival of that problem so personal and intimate that it seems unfitting or too embarrassing to share with anyone other than self.


We are entering a time of the year, Christmas, that is often quietly characterized as a “period of loneliness.” Many of us will spend the “Christmas period” grieving for or reflecting about the loved ones, be it parent, family member, friend, partner, or special acquaintance, to whom we’ve said goodbye.
Be reminded, God does not abandon nor does He become too busy for you. Scripture so affirms:

 

  • Affirms 1 Peter 5:10, God is “God of all grace…”
  • Affirms 2 Corinthians 1:3, God is “the God of all comfort”
  • Affirms Psalm 4:3, “The LORD will hear when I call unto him.”

 

In other words, concerning you or that person to whom you are called to minister, for God there is no need too small, no place too remote, no burden too heavy that our Father God will not listen and care and give mercy. Psalm 145:18 says it so well: “The Lord is close to all who call on him, yes, to all who call on him in truth.” Therefore, to you experiencing loneliness and to you who minister to the lonely, in compliance with Psalm 62:8, “pour out your heart before him: God is a refuge for us. Selah.”
God is up there, over there and right here! Jesus said, as recorded in John 16:7: “It is expedient for you that I go away: for if I go not away, the Comforter will not come unto you; but if I depart, I will send him unto you.”

 

Saints and friends, our God is a triune God; He can be both in heaven and in our room and even, as the Holy Spirit, within our very hearts. Take heed to these final Scriptures:

 

  • Psalm 66:18: Of course, “if I regard iniquity in my heart, the Lord will not hear me.”
  • 1 Peter 3:12: But for those who confess and forsake their sins, “his ears are open unto their prayers.”

 

Gerald Seals serves as associate professor of business administration at Newberry College, and as pastor of the Living Word Church and Fellowship in Columbia.

Day 18


By Jay Salter ‘19


“For whatever was written in former days was written for our instruction, that through endurance and through the encouragement of the Scriptures we might have hope. May the God of endurance and encouragement grant you to live in such harmony with one another, in accord with Christ Jesus, that together you may with one voice glorify the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ. Therefore welcome one another as Christ has welcomed you, for the glory of God.”

Romans 15:4-13 (ESV)
 

It's a week away from Christmas Day, and as festivities with family and friends come into full swing, aside from the birth narratives in Matthew and Luke, I don’t think there are many verses more fitting for the season than the one we have today. Paul succinctly talks about the unifying power of faith, which, along with Scripture and the grace of God, have a propensity to bring people together. And that’s what Christmas does, doesn’t it? Christmas is perhaps best known for reuniting families, inciting gift-giving and the spending of quality time, and encouraging acts of charity and kindness to strangers.

 

But another aspect of beauty about this verse is that the hope and harmony so natural to Advent are not limited to this season alone. For the spirit of the season is the spirit that provides guidance and encouragement every day, all the time. So for the next seven days and the following twelve and for all days to come, let us rejoice in the gifts God has given us, take encouragement from the Scriptures, and welcome one another as Christ has welcomed us.

 

Dear God, thank you for the gifts of the season and for giving us opportunities to come together in harmony. Encourage us this day and in the coming days to live faithfully to your Word, and to take the spirit of Christmas wherever we go, in whatever we do. Amen.
 

Jay Salter ‘19 serves his alma mater as communication specialist.
 

Day 17

By Eric Brandenberger
 

“Now faith is confidence in what we hope for and assurance about what we do not see. This is what the ancients were commended for. By faith we understand that the universe was formed at God’s command, so that what is seen was not made out of what was visible. By faith Abel brought God a better offering than Cain did. By faith he was commended as righteous, when God spoke well of his offerings. And by faith Abel still speaks, even though he is dead.”

Hebrews 11: 1-4 (NIV)


These verses are often titled, “Faith in Action.” Faith is powerful, and strong emotions accompany it. When our faith is strong we are comfortable. As stated in verse 1, Faith is confidence and assurance. When our faith falters however, we feel troubled. This Advent season is a wonderful time for each of us as Christians to put our faith into action. As His disciples we are called upon to lift up, support and strengthen the faith of others who may be struggling. Recognize the fact that He created every person that you see. They are our brothers and sisters in Christ. And as Jesus points out, “even the very hairs of your head are numbered.” (Matt: 10:30) This is true for each person that you encounter.

 

People’s emotions are often difficult to read, even amongst those we know. By putting some simple actions into practice we can take a good first step in spreading God’s oneness. During this season of hustle-bustle, slow down and acknowledge the individuals around you, even strangers. Look people in the eyes with looks of kindness. Smile. Take the time to introduce yourself with a hand shake. Use people’s names. Using names conveys your respect for the person and supports their self-worth. It is important. Stay in touch with people as you travel. Do your best to ensure that those who may be alone know that they are still included in your care. Include those who may only be acquaintances. When dealing with traffic, slow down and acknowledge the other driver with a smile. Look them in the eyes, not the tires. These small acts are starting points to uplifting others. These few, simple expressions of Christian humanity express brotherly love to those may be struggling with their Faith.

 

To those who are struggling with faith, please make yourself known. Plug in to the fellowship of Christianity. You are welcome. You are important. And you are loved. View each of these steps as beginning actions that will grow throughout the coming year.

 

Heavenly Father, as we celebrate this Advent season empower us as disciples to help those struggling with faith. Be with us as we uplift these brothers and sisters in Your fellowship, so that we can all relish in the warmth of Your love. As Christians we pray to You through our Savior, Your Son, Jesus Christ. Amen.

 

Eric Brandenberger is a friend of Newberry College.
 

Day 16

By Whitney Metz ‘09

 

“In those days Mary set out and went with haste to a Judean town in the hill country, where she entered the house of Zechariah and greeted Elizabeth. When Elizabeth heard Mary’s greeting, the child leaped in her womb. And Elizabeth was filled with the Holy Spirit and exclaimed with a loud cry, ‘Blessed are you among women, and blessed is the fruit of your womb. And why has this happened to me, that the mother of my Lord comes to me? For as soon as I heard the sound of your greeting, the child in my womb leaped for joy. And blessed is she who believed that there would be a fulfillment of what was spoken to her by the Lord.’”

Luke 1:39-45 (NRSV)
 

How many people liked my post? Did everyone view my Snapchat? Is my car cool enough? Do people like my clothes? Are my grades as good as my friend’s grades? My friends are all in great relationships, why aren’t I? Graduation is six months away and all my friends already have jobs. I don’t.

 

Some of these sound small but might weigh pretty heavy on your heart. Some of these and many others are very big and weigh very heavy. This heaviness is hard to carry.

 

In today’s text, Mary is on her way to her cousin Elizabeth’s house with the good news of pregnancy. Elizabeth had spent a long time trying to get pregnant with her husband. Mary wasn’t in a relationship, was a virgin and was now miraculously pregnant with the Christ Child.

 

Can you imagine how this made Elizabeth feel? The heaviness. Though Elizabeth didn’t have Instagram to remind her of Mary’s joy, the same emotions were true for Elizabeth as they are for many of us. Can you imagine how Mary felt? Mary questioned if she could handle what she was given. How often are you given, thrown or pushed into something you didn’t ask for? Carrying things we don’t ask for is full of similar fears and anxieties.

 

Our culture of comparison can really harm us. But just as in today’s text there is great JOY for us. As God promised Mary and Elizabeth, he promises us too. Elizabeth received what she prayed for and Mary received God’s promise of blessings.

 

What are you praying for in your life? What has life placed in front of you that you don’t feel you can handle? Our text today reminds us to LEAP for JOY! Rejoice this Advent season as we prepare for what God has promised. Rejoice in Christ’s coming. Rejoice in the belief that our fulfillment will come. Rejoice!

 

Good and Gracious God, we ask you to come to us in our fears and anxieties. We pray you will meet us in our times of questioning, both, the things we want and the things we have not planned. We leap for joy this day as we prepare your coming Son, your promise fulfilled. Amen.

 

Whitney Metz ‘09 serves her alma mater as assistant vice president for institutional advancement.
 

Day 15


“Do Not Be Afraid”
 

By the Rev. Joanie Holden ‘11

 

“In the sixth month the angel Gabriel was sent by God to a town in Galilee called Nazareth, to a virgin engaged to a man whose name was Joseph, of the house of David. The virgin's name was Mary. And he came to her and said, ‘Greetings, favored one! The Lord is with you.’ But she was much perplexed by his words and pondered what sort of greeting this might be. The angel said to her, ‘Do not be afraid, Mary, for you have found favor with God. And now, you will conceive in your womb and bear a son, and you will name him Jesus.’”

Luke 1:26-31 (NRSV)
 

No matter how many times I read this passage, I confess I find myself thinking about Mary and wondering if she was really as calm as the passage implies. If it had been me as a 12-year-old girl I would have thought something like, “Is Gabriel out of his mind? I am engaged, and Joe is never going to buy the idea of marrying a pregnant virgin. What am I supposed to tell Dad and Mom? What will people think? I’ll just tell them God got me pregnant and they are going to buy it? No way. God, you don’t know what you are asking of me.”

 

I must admit, I speak from experience because I asked God if God was out of Their collective minds when nearly 20 years ago God began calling me to be a pastor. I gave a whole list of arguments ranging from being too old (50), to my husband will never go for this (which he did, willingly). Don’t you hate it when God is always right?
But what I discovered is that when God calls us to do something, no matter how outrageous it sounds, after God deals with our arguments, our panic attacks, and our feelings of inadequacy and “why me God;” once we say yes, God calms our fears and gives us everything that we need in order to obey, no matter what God is calling us to do or be. So, perhaps Luke just left out Mary’s panic attack so he could share with us the peace that only comes from saying yes to God.

 

God says to our hearts every day of our lives, “Do not be afraid. I am with you because I know life is a scary challenge, made harder by the forces that try to distract you from being and doing who and what I created you to be and do.” God is not out of Their collective minds when God calls us, because God knows us better than we know ourselves, will never call us to do something They have not equipped us to do, and will walk with us.

 

All knowing and creating God, continue to calm our fears and open our hearts so that we can know your voice and follow it no matter how ridiculous the task sounds or how afraid we are. Thank you for never giving up on any of us. Amen.
 

The Rev. Joanie Holden ‘11 serves as pastor of St. Timothy Lutheran Church in Crystal River, Florida.
 

Day 14


“‘Even now,’ declares the Lord, ‘return to me with all your heart, with fasting and weeping and mourning.’ Rend your heart and not your garments. Return to the Lord your God, for he is gracious and compassionate, slow to anger and abounding in love. Who knows? He may turn and have pity and leave behind a blessing – grain offerings and drink offerings for the Lord your God… And afterword, I will pour out my Spirit on all people. Your sons and daughters will prophesy, your old men will dream dreams, and your young men will see visions. Even on my servants, both men and women, I will pour out my Spirit in those days. I will show wonders in the heavens and on the earth, blood and fire and billows of smoke.”

Joel 12-14, 28-30 (NIV)


It’s that time of year again – getting ready for Christmas. Start (continue) buying gifts for everyone on my list. Clean up the Christmas card list (deleting names of those who didn’t send a card last year). Pick out, and decorate, the tree (making sure ALL the lights work). Figure out what I want to say in my annual letter to let everyone know how the past year has treated me. And, most important, start baking my checkerboard cookies. If I start at the beginning of November, I should be able to be ready. It seems that at some point each year I ask why I put myself through this. Each year I keep doing it.

 

But what about getting ready for Christ? After all, isn’t the birth of Christ the reason we celebrate?

 

The rending, or tearing, of garments is an outward sign of deep emotion, grief, contrition. But God does not want outward signs. He wants a true heart, a contrite heart, a loving heart. God has blessed us with many gifts. He has more to give. God wants us to know his unconditional love, a love freely given, no strings attached. God’s love does not dependent on some bargain we propose in hopes that He will listen. He wants our heart, not public displays. As we prepare for the outward signs of Christmas, are we also preparing our heart?

 

Father God, help me have an open heart. Open to the love you have for me. Open to the love of family and friends. Open to the love of neighbors and strangers. You want my heart and the love only it can give. Help to remember that love cannot be bought or sold. It can only be given away freely. Amen.

 

Dr. Dennis Lambries serves as adjunct professor of political science.
 

Day 13


“As the rain and the snow come down from heaven, and do not return to it without watering the earth and making it bud and flourish, so that it yields seed for the sower and bread for the eater, so is my word that goes out from my mouth: It will not return to me empty, but will accomplish what I desire and achieve the purpose for which I sent it.” Isaiah 55:10-11 (NIV)

 

Isaiah 55 is a longer passage and I’ve selected just one verse for the focus of the devotion today. Verse 11 refers to the word of God going out from God’s mouth, accomplishing a goal and achieving a purpose. Does this mean the written word, like this Scripture itself, or the spoken word? John 1:1 tells us “the word was God” and in 1:14 calls Jesus “the word made flesh.” I think the verse encompasses all of these. Jesus certainly fit the description of accomplishing a goal and achieving God’s purpose. So do the written and spoken celebration of the miracles, power, and love of God.

 

Being the selfish sinner that I am, this makes me wonder about myself, whether my word “accomplishes what I desire and achieves the purpose for which I sent it.” Do my words make a difference? Am I speaking the truth, fostering hope, offering compassion, or supporting a righteous cause? There’s no doubt in my mind - our words matter. An insult from someone you love can cut deep, and in contrast, a compliment can save a bad day. What you say reflects your character and integrity. Your word might not be the savior of the world or Holy Scripture, but it can change your mood and affect those around you.

 

Christmas Day may bring crazy super awesome joy but the lead up can be extremely stressful. Gift-giving chaos and travel debacles. Finals and papers and projects, oh my! Work deadlines and financial difficulties and family pressure. All the makings for frustration, sadness, and struggle. Most of us are dealing with one or more of these concerns. Now is our chance to practice conscious conversation. To be deliberate. To choose our words wisely. To reconsider a rude comment, a passive aggressive response, or sharing hurtful gossip. To think about what purpose our words serve. To opt for integrity. It takes strength of heart and mind and I think we’re up to the task. Let’s let our words serve a higher purpose.

 

Dear God, thank you for sending us your word, the ultimate example of integrity. Help us as we strive to speak the good word and live with unreproached character. Lead us to compassion over insult, and positivity over anger, today and every day. Amen.

 

Libby Sherman is a friend of Newberry College.
 

Day 12

“Here is my servant, whom I uphold, my chosen one in whom I delight; I will put my Spirit on him, and he will bring justice to the nations. He will not shout or cry out or raise his voices in the streets. A bruised reed he will not break, and a smoldering wick he will not snuff out. In faithfulness he will bring forth justice; he will not falter or be discouraged till he establishes justice on earth. In his teaching the islands will put their hope. This is what GOD the Lord says-the Creator of the heavens, who stretches them out, who spreads out the earth with all that springs from it, who gives breath to its people, and life to those who walk on it: ‘I, the Lord, have called you in righteousness; I will take hold of your hand. I will keep you and make you to be a covenant for the people and a light for the Gentiles, to open eyes that are blind, to free captives from prison and to release from the dungeon those who sit in darkness. I am the Lord; that is my name! I will not yield my glory to another or my praise to idols. See, the former things have taken place, and new things I declare; before they spring into being, I announce them to you.’” 

Isaiah 42: 1-9 (NIV)


To have choices is a very special thing. Everyone loves having options to choose from. I’m the type of person who loves to have multiple things to choose from. We don’t always make the correct choice or the wise choice. However, we are indeed blessed to be able to choose and boy, do we have a lot of choices. We can choose what we want to wear or what we want to eat. We can choose where we want to live and even choose where we want to go to college.


GOD is the exact same way. He chooses who wants to use in order to do his will. He chose his only begotten son to be born to live an earthly life and redeem all mankind. He chose Jesus Christ. And GOD didn’t stop there. He chose us. He chose to bless us. He chose to redeem us. He chose to give us abundant life. And trust me. GOD believes we are worth it.


Heavenly Father, Thank you for being the wise GOD that you are. Thank you for this season of Advent. Thank you for choosing Jesus Christ to redeem us. Thank you for choosing us. May we work to prove you right in your choosing of us. In Jesus’ Name, Amen.

 

Dr. John Lesaine ‘07 serves as assistant dean for academic affairs and associate professor of sport professions.

Day 11

"After Jesus had finished instructing his twelve disciples, he went on from there to teach and preach in the towns of Galilee. When John, who was in prison, heard about the deeds of the Messiah, he sent his disciples to ask him, 'Are you the one who is to come, or should we expect someone else?' Jesus replied, 'Go back and report to John what you hear and see: The blind receive sight, the lame walk, those who have leprosy are cleansed, the deaf hear, the dead are raised, and the good news is proclaimed to the poor. Blessed is anyone who does not stumble on account of me.' "

Matthew 11:1-6 (NIV)

 

John The Baptist’s current status: prison!  He has little reason to feel hopeful about his future and the future of Christians. So, he asked some of his friends to ask Jesus himself if He was the real deal.  His answer in today’s terms might have been “hold my beer” while he performed healings in front of them.  You know the term: don’t believe it until you see it? Exactly.

 

The messengers brought back good news and hope to John.  Hope is so powerful there are many books, articles, podcasts, sermons and memes about hope.  Evidence that gives you hope can change a life and even save a life.   While I have not been in prison, I have lost hope a few times in my life. You know when you just want to see good things happen to good people? I’ve been told to pray for patience, but patience requires faith that God will give you evidence of hope.  The healings that Jesus performed was the ultimate display of the saying “I have the receipts.”

 

There was good news of the things to come for John and there is good news to come for you during this Advent season.  You can always choose to exaggerate the good news for yourself and others and spread it like the Gospel intended.

 

Prayer: In your name I pray for the courage to bring evidence of hope to the people in our lives and in the world. We remain grateful for the celebration of the good news that Advent brings to us while our faith comforts us during this time of waiting and preparation.

 

Lori Ann Summers serves as vice president for institutional advancement.

Day 10

"Comfort ye, comfort ye my people, saith your God. Speak ye comfortably to Jerusalem, and cry unto her, that her warfare is accomplished, that her iniquity is pardoned: for she hath received of the Lord's hand double for all her sins. The voice of him that crieth in the wilderness, Prepare ye the way of the Lord, make straight in the desert a highway for our God. Every valley shall be exalted, and every mountain and hill shall be made low: and the crooked shall be made straight, and the rough places plain: And the glory of the Lord shall be revealed, and all flesh shall see it together: for the mouth of the Lord hath spoken it."

Isaiah 40:1-5 King James Version (KJV)

 

Good morning, Newberry College and Newberry!  Today is already the 10th of December, wow!

Today, at the college, the students are rejoicing that all of their fall semester final exams are over, the professors are sighing over grading all of those final exams and papers, and the staff is busily preparing for Winter Graduation Exercises scheduled for this Saturday, the 14th of December. Today in Newberry, stores are opening, hoping for another successful shopping day, people are having parties and hurrying to get cards mailed and presents purchased. 

 

But today for me, Handel’s Messiah will be playing in my head all day. It is a wonderful Tenor solo- look it up and listen to it on YouTube. And in the hustle and bustle of your day, please pay attention to just a couple of phrases. 

 

Let’s start with “Comfort ye.”  This is the imperative, the command to comfort and be in turn comforted. Who will you comfort today? And will you allow yourself to relax and be comforted by others?

 

The next phrase is, “iniquity is pardoned.”  Who has ever used the word, “iniquity” recently?  Iniquity is defined as,  ‘immortal or grossly unfair behavior.’  In church language, we would call it, ‘sin.’ But Isaiah is reminding us that God says our sins are forgiven. 

 

And why are our sins forgiven? Jesus. Jesus is the reason for the season and Jesus is the, “glory of the Lord, revealed.”

 

So today, with a happy song in your heart and mind and ear, try to remember that Jesus came and died for you, yes,  you personally! There is nothing going on today that you and God can’t handle. And there is nothing in this world that can separate you from the love of God in Christ Jesus. Rejoice!

 

Please pray with me. 

Dear God,

Thank you for sending your son, Jesus as a sacrifice for my sins. Please help me remember today to also be a light in the darkness to others and to rejoice in the gifts you have already given me. Amen. 

 

Annie Worman is married to Newberry Campus Pastor Ernie Worman.

Day 9

“Say to those who are of a fearful heart, “Be strong, do not fear!  Here is your God. …He will come and save you.”  

(Isaiah 35:4)

 

Candidates these days talk a lot about climate change, health care, and refugee resettlement.   As we read in our text for today—Isaiah 35:1-10—the prophet beat them to it by about 2700 years!  Way back then, as he discerned the Lord breaking into his age of political unrest and social upheaval, the prophet was told to declare that God would usher in a brand new day marked by bloom, balm, and blessing. 

 

First he spoke of the earth itself rejoicing: “The wilderness and the dry land shall be glad,” he proclaims, “the desert shall rejoice and blossom.”  It is God’s will that the planet itself experience transformation—a climate change of divine design.  Beauty.  Bloom.  Blossom.  Bounty.  So, unless we wish to swim upstream against the currents of divine will, we need to care about our planet. 

 

Second, Isaiah promised a radical new form of health care.  “Then the eyes of the blind shall be opened, and ears of the deaf unstopped; the lame shall leap like a deer, and the tongue of the speechless sing for joy.”  God’s brand of healing is not constrained by health care costs and big pharma.  No, the balm of divine healing stems from the medicine of mercy, a dose of compassion, and a prescription of love.  Our health care industry could stand to take notes. 

 

Finally, Isaiah makes clear that when the Lord shows up, God brings the refugees with him.  Speaking of the uprooted exiles scattered around the empire, he proclaimed, “And the ransomed of the Lord shall return, and come to Zion…,” which for us is best understood as the place where God Godself dwells and where “all whose hearts are restless till they rest in God” are welcome.   God’s kingdom is not distinguished by a dividing wall but a divine will—the will that in God’s good time comes to be done on earth as in heaven.  And that is the greatest blessing of all.

 

Bloom, balm, and blessing!  This is the proclamation of the prophet. This is the hope of Advent.  This is the will of God. 

 

Is it yours?

 

Let us pray:  Stir up your Spirit, O Lord, and come.  Nurture and safeguard our home planet—the only home we have—that even the deserts may flower and bear fruit.  Bring to bear your healing power on all who suffer disease, debilitation, and despair.  And bless those who wander lost and restless with a happy homecoming in a place of your gracious welcome.  Amen.

 

The Rev. Dr. Wayne Kannaday ‘75 serves his alma mater as professor of religion.

Day 8

“With joy you will draw water from the wells of salvation. And you will say in that day: Give thanks to the Lord, call on his name; make known his deeds among the nations; proclaim that his name is exalted.”

Isaiah 12:3-4 (ESV)

 

Bad stuff is ahead. Exile, violence, suffering, and pain are on the horizon according to the prophet Isaiah to his people at the time. Isaiah is not a prophet that shies away from reality, and the truth at the time was that larger, more powerful nations and militaries were closing in around them, and such powers were about to storm and take the land for their own king’s economic advantage and power. The people of Isaiah’s time weren’t a world power (but many of them wanted to be, further angering God). Instead they were the focus of the world’s powers, and not a good focus.


The prophet spends a lot of time in these early chapters being very honest about what’s to come. And it wasn’t good.


Then comes a promise: Even though the people were destined to be exiled to distant lands, God was already busy leveling a new path from those distant lands back towards their home. “And you will say in that day” is the day when Israel’s remnant will return on this new path, this highway.


You see, the prophets do not declare that God steers people away from what they fear most. On the contrary, they declare that what people fear most will be endured, and from that endurance comes a brand-new path reminiscent of their ancestor’s stories.


And when the people will have come through the hardship, a new, wide path will have been cleared for them. And on this path are wells of salvation and trees that sing and clap their hands. And those world powers and threats and all that was once feared will be silenced, because fear will no longer be the teacher.


In the Advent season we pray for that day for all of creation. And we pray for all the days before it. And we live all the days set before us, striving to live toward that day now.


Let us pray. Your name is exalted, O Holy God, for you are the way-maker. Give us good courage that you are leading us every day towards that new day for the whole world. In Jesus’ name. Amen.


The Rev. Michael Price ‘02 serves as pastor of Grace Lutheran Church in Prosperity, South Carolina.

Day 7

"May the God of hope fill you with all joy and peace as you trust in him, so that you may overflow with hope by the power of the Holy Spirit."

Romans 15:4-13 (NIV)

 

We talk a lot about hope and trust. We even put wall hangings of the words in homes and offices, wear necklaces proclaiming the 4 letter words, and color in meditative coloring books, filling in the letters with hearts and flowers. We hold these words dear, but do we know how powerful they really are? How can we begin to understand the power that’s in what this passage from Romans is saying and apply it in our daily lives?

 

My daughter reminded me with these words this morning, “Sometimes we find ourselves in situations in which we feel powerless. This is when it’s most important to trust in God and the plan that He has for us. In this life there are lots of things that bring us joy, but God brings us true peace. If we look for joy and peace in other things, we will find that they don’t bring us the same hope God does. God is the most powerful force and will triumph over the evils in the world.” I was very grateful for this reminder she gave me, and how perfect that it fit with the advent devotion for today!

 

Romans 15 says that as we trust, hope grows. Trust in God so that we may overflow with hope. In this season, may you find hope and trust renewed every day. As we work with the students of Newberry College, may we share this hope with them. May our hope be the spark that ignites the fire of good ideas, creativity, clarity of action and a greater joy as we all become more trusting that God’s got it all worked out if we just allow it to flow.

 

As we raise the bow and draw another arrow of hope from the quiver, trust in Him.

 


Julie McCrary is director of institutional research and effectiveness at Newberry College.

Day 6

"For a child has been born for us, a son given to us; authority rests upon his shoulders; and he is named Wonderful Counsellor, Mighty God, Everlasting Father, Prince of Peace.  His authority shall grow continually, and there shall be endless peace for the throne of David and his kingdom."
Isaiah 9:2-7

 

Today’s full reading from Isaiah tells a remarkable story. Like so many biblical passages, the images are vivid. We read of a group of people who have been through a time of darkness: who have been hungry and who have been oppressed by enemy warriors. But light has come! The enemy has been defeated, and joy abounds. What is the source of this joy? The birth of a baby, a baby who promises to bring perpetual peace to the land.

 

What leads us to be so moved by this story? For people who are not Christians, this story may sound like a fanciful tale, even if they have experienced the hope and joy that the birth of a child brings. Yes, a child is the ultimate sign of new life, fresh beginnings, and hope for a brighter future. But is it really enough to pull an entire people out of a long era of darkness?

 

It just might be. Where does your hope lie? When you find yourself in times of darkness or uncertainty, what turns your face toward the light of hope?

 

The Christian story dares to declare that the Holy shows up in perhaps the least expected place—in our very midst, taking on human flesh. Once we recognize that God has promised to dwell among us, during times of both strife and peace, we understand that God’s light is always available to us. Advent is the reminder that, regardless of our circumstances, God is always lovingly, tenderly present. Hope is ours for the taking. 

 

Prayer: Holy One, may this season of Advent remind us that you are with us in times of both joy and suffering. Give us eyes to see your light and hearts to know the hope you offer.  Amen.

 

Dr. Krista E. Hughes serves as director of the Newberry College Muller Center and associate professor of religion.

Day 5

"Therefore, the Lord will give you a sign. The young woman is pregnant and is about to give birth to a son, and she will name him Immanuel."

Isaiah 7:14 (CEB)

 

Grace and peace to each of you this blessed day full of thanks. For those of you who know me (even if you don’t know me well), you know that I love to have fun. Specifically, with games, toys, and activities. Whether it is playing with my daughters or having fun with the children and youth in my congregation, I love to have fun being with people.

 

In my office I have several toys that I’ve collected and procured one way or another throughout the years. But, unlike other collections, this one is meant to be used and not just looked at. Seeing young and young-at-heart eyes light up when they all those figures brings me joy.

 

The thing that brings me the most joy is when a person asks if they can play with those toys and then invites me into that place of imagination and joy alongside them. In that invitation I get to see them at their brightest. I get to see them at times at their most vulnerable. I get to see them. I get to be with them. I get to be in a stronger relationship with them.

 

In our brief text this day, we hear the words of the Prophet Isaiah as he speaks God’s word to Ahaz. Here God proclaims through the great prophet about a child who is to be born. But, this isn’t just any ol’ kid – this one is special. His name will be Immanuel. He will be called, “God with us.”

 

Isaiah is foretelling of the time that God will come down to be with us. For we believe, follow, struggle with, and are guided by a God whose love for us is so deep and wide, that this God is right there with us. God is not off somewhere else tending to other matters. God has promised, has fulfilled that promise, and continues in that hope today.

 

God is with us. No matter who you are, no matter what you’ve done, no matter what you think, God’s love for you (and for all of creation) is so strong that God has come to be with you and with the world. God has come to show you not only how much you are loved, but how much you can show love to the world through God’s son, Jesus Christ, our Lord.

 

God sees us at our brightest. God sees us when we’re most vulnerable. God sees us. Why? Because God is with us and because God is with us – always – we get to dive deeper into that beloved relationship.

 

Let us pray…

God who is close, God who is with us – you have promised and have come down to be with those whom you have created and with whom you love so dear. You are never far off from us. Continue to show us your love, guide us in your truth, and push us to live into your love for all in the world – amen!

 

The Rev. Matthew Titus ‘05, pastor at the Lutheran Church of the Redeemer in Newberry.

Day 4

Living Through the Lens of Christ

 

"His delight shall be in the fear of the Lord. He shall not judge by what his eyes see, or decide by what his ears hear." 

NRSV Isaiah 11:3

 

Christians read these verses as announcing the Messiah and describing His characteristics, the qualities that He will possess, that will result in Him making judgments based on His righteousness and not on what human senses (which are often fallible) perceive. Remember, Jesus is fully human and fully divine, meaning that He can resist the judgmental pitfalls that humans are subject to.

 

But what about us and how we make our decisions? Consider for a moment the difference it can make in our lives and in the world if we allow the Holy Spirit (that we too receive as a result of Jesus’ promise to send Her to guide us and remind us of all that Jesus teaches) to help us delight in the Lord, and to not judge by what we see or hear (especially on social media), but as Christ would. What happens if we see and hear and think through the lens of Christ? I believe it would change how we view everyone (as all brothers and sisters in Christ – whether they are like us or not, whether they agree with us or not, whether they are friend, stranger or foe) and how we decide what matters most: our stuff or people.

 

At this time of the year, almost everyone thinks about the poor and hungry and homeless, but living through the lens of Christ would give us CHRISTmas hearts all the time throughout the year. Perhaps as an Advent renewal experience, we can decide to make our New Year’s Promise to God to live through the lens of Christ, allowing that same Spirit to guide our thoughts, words, and actions towards all people and the rest of God’s creation.

 

Gracious, generous, forgiving God, open our hearts, minds, and wills to the guidance of your Holy Spirit so that we can strive to live as selflessly as Christ and serve one another as Christ serves us. In Jesus’ name we ask this. Amen.

 

The Rev. Joanie Holden ‘11 serves as pastor of St. Timothy Lutheran Church in Crystal River, Florida.

Day 3

"Besides this, you know what time it is, how it is now the moment for you to wake from sleep. For salvation is nearer to us now than when we became believers; the night is far gone, the day is near. Let us then lay aside the works of darkness and put on the armor of light; let us live honorably as in the day, not in reveling and drunkenness, not in debauchery and licentiousness, not in quarreling and jealousy. Instead, put on the Lord Jesus Christ, and make no provision for the flesh, to gratify its desires." 

Romans 13:11-14 (NRSV)

 

So, what kind of people do you suppose the Christians in Rome were? It sounds like they were sleeping in and sleeping around. It sounds like they were into a lot of excess and a lot of drama. The 1978 film Animal House seems tame in comparison. St. Paul’s admonition suggests that they were not on their best behavior and needed to straighten up.

 

My senior year at Newberry College, I lived on the ground floor of Brokaw Hall. One spring morning, I woke to the sound of someone outside, knocking on my window. It was my mother. She had driven from Virginia for the Awards Day Convocation. When my name was called, I wasn’t there. I had slept in. I don’t recall exactly why I had slept in, whether, perhaps, the night before I had been “reveling” or engaging in some other behavior Paul admonished the Romans about. No need to go there.

 

Sleeping in, I had missed an opportunity to receive an award for doing something well and I had missed the opportunity for my mother to proudly celebrate that with me. She and I went out for lunch that day and we had a nice visit, but I knew that she was disappointed at having driven over 500 miles in order to find me sleeping in.

 

One of the themes of Advent is “Jesus is coming soon! Straighten up!” What if you expected Jesus to show up tomorrow morning? What would you want to straighten up between now and then? Jesus isn’t coming to give you a load of grief, but to celebrate with you the joy of salvation. St. Paul tells us that now is the time to get ready, “for salvation is nearer to us now than when we became believers.”

 

We pray: Come, Lord Jesus. Save us from our sins and lead us into the light. Amen.

 

The Rev. Dr. Ben Moravitz is a retired ELCA pastor and a 1976 graduate of Newberry College.

Day 2

“In those days John the Baptist appeared in the wilderness of Judea, proclaiming, . . . ‘I baptize you with water for repentance, but one who is more powerful than I is coming after me; I am not worthy to carry his sandals. He will baptize you with the Holy Spirit and fire.’” 

Matthew 3:1, 11 (NRSV)

 

One of my favorite Advent hymns is “Soon and Very Soon” (With One Voice, 744). In its simplicity, it describes the nature of hope in the season of Advent: “Soon and very soon, we are goin’ to see the King.” For those who follow the liturgical calendar, Advent is a time of waiting, a time of anticipation. The four weeks leading to Christmas are filled with stories that proclaim the coming of Jesus, the Savior. These are generally not fun stories – some of them speak of war and destruction, of dismantled families and sinful deeds.

 

John the Baptist, or more accurately, the Baptizer, made the most recognizable of these proclamations. It was John’s role to announce the coming of Christ.  Though he didn’t say it exactly this way, he says, “soon and very soon, we are goin’ to see the King.” For John, the coming of Jesus was imminent.  And though John’s message sounded harsh (“You brood of vipers! Who warned you to flee from the wrath to come!”), and he seems very much like a wild man screaming at the good folks of Judea, his message is one of hope.

 

The good news about Jesus is that Jesus can do what no one else can do: save us from sin. As we make our way through a world of war, conflicting viewpoints, separated families, and other calamaties, it is Christ who gives us hope. It is the promise of the resurrection that leads us through the darkness and into the light.

 

Soon and very soon . . .

 

Let us pray: Stir up in us your Holy Spirit, Lord. Help us to wait with confidence for the coming of your Son who will baptize us, bestow the Holy Spirit upon us, and save us from the power of sin. Amen.

 

The Rev. Dr. Christy WendlandAssociate Dean of the College

Day 1

“But about that day or hour no one knows, not even the angels in heaven, nor the Son, but only the Father. As it was in the days of Noah, so it will be at the coming of the Son of Man. For in the days before the flood, people were eating and drinking, marrying and giving in marriage, up to the day Noah entered the ark; and they knew nothing about what would happen until the flood came and took them all away. That is how it will be at the coming of the Son of Man. Two men will be in the field; one will be taken and the other left. Two women will be grinding with a hand mill; one will be taken and the other left. Therefore keep watch, because you do not know on what day your Lord will come. But understand this: If the owner of the house had known at that time of night the thief was coming, he would have kept watch and would not have let his house be broken into. So you also must be ready, because the Son of Man will come at an hour when you do not expect him.”

Matthew 24: 36-44 (NIV)

 

Anticipation can be a tricky thing, especially when you don’t know when you want to happen will actually happen. We can be excited, or we can be nervous. We can also be excitedly nervous. Waiting for something is never easy. However, we can be rest assured that whatever we are anticipating will happen, even if it doesn’t happen the way we want it to.

 

The advent season is very special to the believer. This is the time where we wait and prepare to celebrate the birth of Jesus Christ as well as his return at the Second Coming. We don’t know when Jesus Christ will return but we know it will happen. We don’t know when the trumpet will sound, and he will descend but we know it will happen. How do we know it will happen? Well because he was born to fulfill prophecy and we know that GOD’s word will not return unto us void as he said in the 55th chapter of Isaiah. Just know that his return, like his birth, will be worth the wait.

 

Heavenly Father,

Thank you for this advent season. As we eagerly await the return of Jesus Christ, please help us to prepare ourselves and each other for that return.

In Jesus' Name,

Amen    

 

Dr. John Lesaine ‘07 serves as assistant dean for academic affairs and associate professor of sport professions.

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Omega Psi Phi

About Omega Psi Phi

The Alpha Delta Chi chapter of Omega Psi Phi was founded at Newberry College on March 22, 2014. Omega Psi Phi was created to bring about union of college men of similar high ideals of scholarship and manhood in order to stimulate the attainment of the ideals and ambitions of its members and to occupy a progressive, helpful and constructive place in political life of the community and nation. Omega Psi Phi is involved in the Assault on Illiteracy Program, hosts an annual blood drive, promotes national action among society and many more philanthropic events.

Omega Psi Phi Fast Facts

Chapter: Alpha Delta Chi, Founded March 22, 2014

Symbol: Lamp 

Color: Royal Purple and Old Gold 

Flower: African Violet 

Motto: Friendship is Essential to the Soul

Omega Psi Phi was founded In 1911; the Alpha Delta Chi Chapter was founded in 2014.

 

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Phi Beta Sigma

About Phi Beta Sigma

The Alpha Beta Psi Chapter of Phi Beta Sigma was founded at Newberry College on June 19, 2001. Phi Beta Sigma was conceived as a mechanism to deliver services to the general community. Rather than gaining skills to be utilized exclusively for themselves and their immediate families, they wished to return their newly acquired skills to the communities from which they had come. The brothers of Phi Beta Sigma also conduct philanthropy events benefitting the March Of Dimes organization.

Phi Beta Sigma Fast Facts

Chapter: Alpha Beta Psi, Founded June 19, 2001

Symbol: Dove 

Color: Royal Blue and Pure White 

Flower: White Carnation 

Motto: Culture For Service and Service For Humanity

Phi Beta Sigma was founded In 1914; The Alpha Beta Psi Chapter at Newberry College was founded in 2001. 

 

 

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Kappa Alpha Psi

About Kappa Alpha Psi

The Xi Pi chapter of Kappa Alpha Psi was founded during the 1992 at Newberry College. The Fraternity has more than 125,000 members with 700 undergraduate and alumni chapters in nearly every state of the United States, and international chapters in Nigeria, South Africa, the West Indies, the United Kingdom, Germany, Korea and Japan. Local chapters of Kappa Alpha Psi participate in community outreach activities to feed the homeless, provide scholarships to young people matriculating to college, serve as mentors to young men, participate in blood drives and serve as hosts of seminars for public health awareness.

Kappa Alpha Psi Fast Facts

Chapter: Xi Pi, Founded in 1992

Symbol: Diamond 

Color: Crimson and Cream 

Flower: Red Carnation 

Motto: Achievement in Every Field of Human Endeavor

Kappa Alpha Psi was founded In 1911; the Xi Pi Chapter at Newberry College was founded in 1992

 

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Theta Chi

About Theta Chi

The Eta Iota chapter of Theta Chi was formed at Newberry College on February 12, 1972. The brothers of Theta Chi are involved in a multitude of the College's Divsion II sports teams along with a variety of other school organizations such as Student Government Association, Interfraternity Council and Teaching Fellows. Theta Chi is a diverse group of young men and it is that diversity which defines them; but all brothers share the common goals of serving their god, their country, and their fellow man. Theta Chi participates in philanthropic events benefitting the USO and, locally,  Boys Farm. Theta Chi hosts annual events, such as the USO Softball Tournament, visits to  Boys Farm and a Low Country Shrimp Boil.

Theta Chi Fast Facts

Chapter: Eta Iota, Founded February 12, 1972)

Symbol: Rattlesnake 

Color: Red and White 

Flower: Red Carnation 

Theta Chi was founded In 1856; the Eta Iota Chapter at Newberry College was founded in 1972. 

Maxim: Alma Mater First and Theta Chi for Alma Mater (Refers to one of the founding ideals of of the fraternity of loyalty to one's college over the course of one's lifetime)

 

 

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Tau Kappa Epsilon

About Tau Kappa Epsilon

The Omicron Theta chapter of Tau Kappa Epsilon was formed at Newberry College on March 31, 1974. Tau Kappa Epsilon strives to be as diverse and unique as the college in which they reside. The brothers of Tau Kappa Epsilon, men of sterling character and staunch uprightness, have joined a brotherhood that believes in the honest convictions of love, charity and esteem. Tau Kappa Epsilon is partnered with Saint Jude Children’s Hospital for their annual philanthropic events. 

Tau Kappa Epsilon Fast Facts

Chapter: Omicron Theta, Founded March 31, 1974

Symbol: Equilateral Triangle 

Color: Crimson Lake Cherry and Pure Silver Gray 

Flower: Red Carnation 

Motto: Better Men for a Better World

Tau Kappa Epison was founded in 1899; The Omicron Theta chapter at Newberry College was founded in 1974. 

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Kappa Alpha Order

About Kappa Alpha Order

The Delta Epsilon chapter of Kappa Alpha Order was founded at Newberry College in the spring of 1964. The Brothers of Kappa Alpha Order present incredible opportunities for growing, meeting challenges and building leadership. For members, there is nothing more substantial or real than the vows they have taken, the strong bonds of brotherhood they have developed, and the personal growth they have achieved. Living together, growing together and learning about each other in a positive and healthy environment is what Kappa Alpha Order at Newberry College represents.

Kappa Alpha Order Fun Facts

Chapter: Delta Epsilon, Founded 1964

Symbol: Lion 

Colors: Crimson and Old Gold 

Flowers: Crimson Rose and Magnolia Blossom 

Motto: Dieu et les Dames  (God and the Ladies)

Kappa Alpha Order was founded In 1865; Delta Epsilong Chapter at Newberry College was founded in 1964. 

 

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Alpha Xi Delta

About Alpha Xi Delta

Twenty-six sisters founded the Epsilon Iota Chapter of Alpha Xi Delta at Newberry College on April 22, 1967, making it the first sorority on the Newberry campus. They were later joined by two other National Panhellenic Sororities. The Epsilon Iota Chapter of Alpha Xi Delta has continued to grow over the years and currently has 44 active sisters. The ladies of Alpha Xi Delta are focused on being successful, well-rounded individuals who seek to spread love and happiness through their actions. Alpha Xi Delta’s major philanthropy is Autism Speaks, for which they host the Light It Up Blue Week. Over the course of that week, the sisters of Alpha Xi Delta host various fundraisers and raffles to benefit the Autism Speaks organization. 

Our Mission

The mission of Alpha Xi Delta Fraternity is to enrich the life of every Alpha Xi Delta through the decision to nurture unity and cooperation; foster intellectual, professional and personal growth; exemplify the highest ethical conduct' instill community responsibility; and perpetuate fraternal growth.

Alpha Xi Delta Fast Facts

Chapter: Epsilon Iota -- Founded April 22, 1967

Symbol: Quill 

Colors: Light Blue, Navy Blue and Gold 

Gems:  Pearl and Diamond 

Flower: Pink Rose 

Alpha Xi Delta Fraternity was founded In 1893; the Epsilon Iota Chapter at Newberry College was founded in 1967. 

 

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Sigma Sigma Sigma

About Sigma Sigma Sigma

The Eta Beta chapter of Sigma Sigma Sigma sorority was founded on April 12, 1997. The sisters of Sigma Sigma Sigma are dedicated to their community on and off campus. Every year, Tri-Sigma celebrates events such as crush, semi-formal, formal, Homecoming, Founders Day, and Greek Week, along with holding mixers with the fraternities on campus. Sigma Sigma Sigma also participates in a variety of philanthropic efforts, including Sigma Serves Children, Robbie Page Memorial, and March of Dimes. Some of the events Tri-Sigma plans in support of these philanthropic interests include selling Rainbows for Robbie, Teeter Totter Marathon, Premature Awareness Month, March for Babies, and Character Counts Week.

Our Mission

Sigma Sigma Sigma exists to provide a lifelong sorority experience for women through ensuring a perpetual bond of friendship, to develop in them strong womanly character, and to impress upon them high standards of conduct.

Sigma Sigma Sigma Fast Facts

Chapter: Eta Beta, Founded April 12, 1997

Symbol: Sailboat 

Colors: Royal Purple, Pearl White, Gold 

Gem: Pearl 

Flower: Purple Violet 

Sigma Sigma Sigma was founded In 1898; Eta Beta Chapter at Newberry College was founded in 1997.

 

 

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Kappa Delta

Overview of Kappa Delta

The Delta Mu chapter of Kappa Delta was founded March 23, 1968, and has initiated more than 700 members. The organization has been nationally recognized and has received awards on several occasions at National Conferences across the country. Philanthropies supported by Kappa Delta include Girl Scouts of America and Prevent Child Abuse America. The sisters of Kappa Delta host several Girl Scout events throughout the year as well as their annual Shamrock Week benefitting PCAA.

Kappa Delta Fast Facts

Chapter: Delta Mu (Founded March 23, 1968

Symbols: Nautilus Shell and Dagger 

Colors: Olive Green and Pearl White 

Gems: Emerald, Diamond, Pearl 

Flower: White Rose 

Motto: Let us strive for that which is honorable, beautiful, and highest

Kappa Delta was founded in 1897. The Delta Mu chapter of Kappa Delta was founded in 1968.

 

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Clarinet Festival

SECOND ANNUAL PALMETTO CLARINET FESTIVAL

Workshops led by guest clinicians, recitals and clarinet choir concert.

Registration fee:  $35 - includes all activities and t-shirt

All ages welcome.

 

Saturday, March 14, 2020

8 AM – 7:30 PM

Free Public Concert  6 PM

 

Newberry College Campus

Alumni Music Center * 2100 College Street, Newberry

 

CLICK HERE to download the complete festival schedule.

How to Register

Registration Fee:  $35 - includes all activities and t-shirt

CLICK HERE to download the registration form. 

Groups should submit one registration form for each person attending. 

 

Mail completed registration form and and fee to:

Dr. Barry McGinnis

Department of Music

Newberry College 

2100 College Street

Newberry, SC  29108

 

Register now and make subsequent payment arrangements by emailing: 

Barry.McGinnis@newberry.edu  --  OR  --  Debbie.Jarman@newberry.edu

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Terms and Conditions

South Carolina Scholarships Terms & Conditions

LIFE, HOPE, Palmetto Fellows and Enhancement Scholarships

 

Students who meet the State of South Carolina’s general eligibility requirements for the LIFE, HOPE, or Palmetto Fellows scholarships are responsible for understanding their initial eligibility requirements and their subsequent renewal requirements. For more information about each of the scholarship programs, please visit the South Carolina Commission on Higher Education’s website (www.che.sc.gov). Listed below are some key facts about the LIFE, HOPE, and Palmetto Fellows scholarship programs:

 

  • The HOPE scholarship may only be awarded during a student’s first year of enrollment immediately following high school graduation. The HOPE scholarship cannot be renewed for subsequent years of attendance.
  • The LIFE, Palmetto Fellows, and Enhancement scholarships are continuous programs. Therefore, if a student drops out or takes a leave of absence from the institution, the student’s defined period of eligibility will continue to elapse just as if the student had remained enrolled. Please note that the requirement to complete 30 credit hours of non-remedial coursework per year remains in effect even if a student chooses to temporarily cease attendance
  • Students must be enrolled on a full-time basis in order to receive LIFE, HOPE, Palmetto Fellows, or Enhancement scholarships.
  • At Newberry College, the LIFE and Palmetto Fellows scholarships are limited to eight consecutive terms for the first four-year degree program. The terms of eligibility begin immediately upon initial college enrollment.
  • The Enhancement scholarship is limited to six consecutive terms for the first four-year degree program. Only eligible sophomores, juniors, and seniors may receive an Enhancement scholarship.
  • Remedial and Developmental courses do not count toward a student’s credit hour calculation for LIFE, HOPE, or Palmetto Fellows.
  • To maintain eligibility for one of the state scholarships, a student must maintain a 3.0 GPA and earn at least 30 credit hours of non-remedial coursework each academic year.
  • In order to earn the Enhancement scholarship, a student must (1) meet all eligibility requirements for LIFE or Palmetto Fellows, (2) be enrolled in an eligible STEM major, and (3) earn at least 14 credit hours of STEM-related coursework during the freshman year of enrollment.

 

This list of terms and conditions is in no way inclusive. For detailed information about the LIFE, HOPE, Palmetto Fellows, and Enhancement scholarships, please visit the Scholarships & Grants for SC Residents section of CHE’s website: www.che.sc.gov.

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W. Darr Wise Piano Competition

W. Darr Wise Piano Competition

At Newberry College

The next competition will be held in 2021

About the Competition

The W. Darr Wise Piano Competition is named in honor of Newberry College Professor Emeritus Dr. W. Darr Wise. Wise was a member of the Newberry College Music faculty for 42 years, serving as both a piano professor and the College organist until his retirement in 1998. His skill as a musician and an educator inspired his students to continue studying and teaching at major music conservatories and to achieve successful careers as performers, church musicians, retailers and leaders in the music industry, teachers and administrators in all levels of education. 

Prizes

Prizes will be awarded for first, second and third in both the junior and senior divisions. First prize winners in each division each receive a cash award. All prize winners will perform one music selection in the winners' recital. 

 

Junior Division, First Prize  --  $150

Senior Division, First Prize  --  $250   PLUS   $5,000 Newberry College Scholarship

 

Honorable Mention may be awarded at the discretion of the judges. 

Competition Repertoire

JUNIOR DIVISION (Grades 6 - 8)

  • Two contrasting solo pieces
  • Competitors must bring two copies of their music

A total of 10 minutes is allocated for each audition; no minimum performance time limit.
The repertoire must be performed from memory in order to be eligible for prizes.

 

SENIOR DIVISION (Grades 9-12)

  • One movement of a Classical sonata
  • One contrasting piece selected by the contestant
  • Competitors must bring two copies of their music

A total of 15 minutes is allocated for each audition; no minimum performance time limit.
The repertoire must be performed from memory in order to be eligible for prizes.

Registration

Registration deadline is Monday, January 13, 2020.

Submit your registration and $25 non-refundable entry fee online here.

Competition Schedule

Competition will take place from approximately 8 a.m. - 5 p.m., with  a winners' recital at the conclusion of the competition.  Specific times will be emailed to competitors and the winners' recital time is to be determined. 

About the Event Organizer

Dr. Sarah Masterson, piano, is currenty Associate Professor of Piano and Music Theory at Newberry College in Newberry, S.C. Dr. Masterson also serves as the Coordinator of Music Theory, Director of the Department of Music Social Media, Freshman Faculty Mentor, and the founding Artistic Director of the W. Darr Wise Piano Competition. As an SCMTA board member, Dr. Masterson serves as Coordinator of Junior Competitions. She is also an active member of the Coljlege Music Society and American Guild of Organists. Prior to joining the Newberry College faculty, she was on faculty at Eastern Connecticut State University and Fitchburg State University.

 

Dr. Masterson's recent research focuses on the work of 20th-century American women composers, and she presented related lecture-recitals at the 2015 Women Composers Festival of Hartford and the 2016 College Music Society Mid-Atlantic Conference. In 2016, she also published a book review in the American Music Teacher magazine. As a performer, Dr. Masterson has performed as a soloist with the Evansville Philharmonic Orchestra, the DePauw Orchestra, and the University of Connecticut Symphony Orchestra. She currently maintains an active performance schedule throughout New England, the Midwest, and the Southeast. In 2018, she premiered a collaborative piece at the North American Saxophone Alliance Conference and presented at the Women Composers Festival of Hartford and the CMS Mid-Atlantic Conference.

 

In 2011, Dr. Masterston completed her Doctorate of Musical Arts at the University of Connecticut, with a major concentration of piano performance and a minor area of emphasis in music theory. Past instructors include Dr. Neal Larrabee, Prof. Claude Cymerman, and Phyllis Niednagel.

Questions?

Dr. Sarah Masterson

sarah.masterson@newberry.edu

803.321.5177

 

Newberry College
Department of Music
2100 College Street
Newberry, SC  29108

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Accessibility

Accessibility

We want everyone who visits the Newberry College website to feel welcome and find the experience rewarding.
 

What are we doing?

To help us make the Newberry College website a positive place for everyone, we've been using the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) 2.0. These guidelines explain how to make web content more accessible for people with disabilities, and user friendly for everyone.

The guidelines have three levels of accessibility (A, AA and AAA). We’ve chosen Level AA as the target for the Newberry College website.
 

How are we doing?

We've worked hard on the Newberry College website and believe we've achieved our goal of Level AA accessibility. We monitor the website regularly to maintain this, but if you do find any problems, please get in touch.
 

Let us know what you think

If you enjoyed using the Newberry College website, or if you had trouble with any part of it, please get in touch. We'd like to hear from you in any of the following ways:

  • email us at admin@newberry.edu
  • call us on 1-800-845-4955
  • get in touch at https://www.newberry.edu/contact
     

This accessibility statement was last updated on 20th March 2018.

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Lent Devotions 2020

Easter Monday, April 13

By Dr. Maurice Scherrens

President of Newberry College

 

"Jesus said to her 'I am the resurrection and he life. The one who believes in me will live, even though they die. And whoever lives by believing in me will never die.'” — John 11:25-26 

 

This language might sound confusing, but that is because God had a much deeper meaning than most of us are used to.

But this is the year to take his words to heart.

There may be no year when the RESURRECTION is more meaningful to us as a world. We have been staggered by a blow from the coronavirus.

The Resurrection gives our lives purpose and direction as well as the opportunity to start over again no matter what our circumstances. Are we ready to recommit to a better life?

After being crucified on Good Friday, do we think anyone was worried about a dead person rising from the tomb, moving away the boulders? Of course not. His fate seemed sealed and inevitable. But He proved us all wrong , oh, we of little faith.

It was God’s way of telling us, 'Fear not. As bad as things may look — like being buried in a tomb — let me show you by RISING UP again that anything is possible.'

It was His way of telling us that the end is nothing more than the beginning in disguise.

 

For each one of us Easter is a reminder that there is a great future ahead of us. We can all leave the mistakes of the past behind us and look forward to a brighter life in the future.

 

His rising from the dead teaches us that Death may be strong, but Life is stronger.

Easter is Hope. No matter how this coronavirus takes a grip on the world, we must believe we can beat it. Just like Christ was put to rest in a tomb with no apparent way out, He found a way out. He found a way to RISE UP. His Resurrection gives us eternal HOPE.

HOPE as being able to see the light when surrounded by nothing but darkness.

When the world tells us to give up, HOPE whispers in our ear to “try it one more time.”

Today, we celebrate Easter and we celebrate HOPE.

Martin Luther said it best, “Everything that is done in this world, is done by HOPE.”

This is the most glorious time of the year. Celebrate this wonderful gift of life and new beginnings.

Stay safe, take care and Happy Easter to you and your family.

Easter Sunday, April 12

By the Rev. Kevin L. Strickland '04

Bishop, ELCA Southeastern Synod

 

Christ is risen! Christ is risen indeed! Alleluia!

 

I have always been struck by the resurrection narrative in Mark’s gospel. It is quick, hurried, and leaves one wondering, what’s the rest of the story. My New Testament professor in seminary once said, “One should read Mark’s gospel starting at the ending and working your way to the front.” I think there is a real meaning and purpose for the Easter account of Mark stopping where it does.  You see, our own experience takes us to moments not unlike those two Mary’s and Salome very early on that first Easter morning.

 

The times, not when we are exalted and jubilant and hopeful and surrounded by all Easter joy and celebration, but the times when we join with these women.  We join them in shock, in shattering moments.  Times when we are stunned into a kind of numb silence.  If not the crisis moments, simply the impact of the ordinary, the everyday, the humdrum, the irritations, the things that just occupy the flat landscape of our lives.  In these, moments, too, Easter seems so far away.

 

Mark, the evangelist, has a purpose for starting the Easter story where our need is the deepest, where we are at our least and most vulnerable.  Mark starts the story there but he doesn’t leave it there, because the message, the word, the announcement, the proclamation picks up these three women on their way in mournful burial rights that first Easter morning.  It opens a new horizon to them, as also to you and to me.  For the message on this day still is, you seek Jesus of Nazareth who was crucified.  He is risen!  He is not here.  He is risen, indeed!

 

This is the power and the heart of the Easter message that is ongoing.  God has put his power whereby He raised His Son from death into a word, a message, and places it on our lips that we may speak it one to another, and sing it, and live it in the conviction that behind this message Christ is risen.  Risen, indeed, is truth, and death and evil and mourning and loss and despair and futility and guilt and sin are not the last word.  The last word lies with the God who meets us in Christ at the open tomb, meets us in our disappointments and loss and illusion, and makes us more than conquerors through Him, through the Risen One, who is for us, and not against us.

 

We are part of the ongoing Easter.  That is the Good News that sweeps you and me up into its fullness.  Over the centuries, men and women, youth and children have been drawn by the magnetic force of God’s redeeming love into the ongoing Easter to be people who have, of course, problems and failures and disappointments.  But people who, by the grace of the Risen One, have learned and are continuing to learn to live on the resurrection side of the cross, people who are drawn together in a community, a congregation of mutual care, of interest, of welcome.  A community that wants to share the treasure of faith, of resurrection hope with those not yet aware of how dear they are in God’s sight.

 

As Easter Christians, who live on this side of the cross, we live in a state of an ongoing Easter.  Not just one day a year.  No one can leave Christ behind.  When the men in the garden and the women at the tomb run away from Jesus; when we leave this church building—We cannot get away from Jesus.  He walks behind us, with us, and ahead of us.

 

And here’s the rest of the story:  He is not here; he has been raised!  He goes ahead of us preparing the way.  Like any good story, this story is not over.  We receive glimpses of more to come each time we taste and see the Lord in bread and wine, in word proclaimed, in washing water.  Stay tuned for the rest of the story: to be continued!

 

Christ is Risen!  He is Risen Indeed! Alleluia! Amen!

Good Friday, April 10

By the Rev. Ernie Worman

Newberry College Campus Pastor

 

“I am the good shepherd; I know my sheep and my sheep know me — just as the Father knows me and I know the Father — and I lay down my life for the sheep. I have other sheep that are not of this sheep pen. I must bring them also. They too will listen to my voice, and there shall be one flock and one shepherd." — John 10:14-16

 

I remember the first time I visited the classroom of my eldest grandchild; she was in kindergarten. I have three amazing grandchildren and it is a joy visiting them in their classrooms for special events. Now I am used to the elementary school environment and the noise and the appearance of chaos that each grade and classroom brings, but that first visit, I was not prepared. My beloved Annie and I entered the classroom for a holiday party sponsored by the classroom moms and dads. Twenty-five children, ages 5-6 depending on their birthdays, eating candy and cookies and other sugary delights, playing holiday party games that were set up in stations of six persons per table. On cue the students were told to rotate places and start on another craft-making thing or game. The room was loud, chaotic, and the parents tried desperately to staff their crafts and games and keep the morning event moving smoothly with fair to middle success. Just when you thought the day and the class and the participants were totally out of control and chaos ruled the day, the teacher stood in the middle of the room and spoke in a relatively calm and quiet voice giving the secret code word special to that class, and the children immediately stopped in their tracks and gave the automated response, and sat down in a circle quietly ready to hear what the teacher had to say. I was amazed. The shock and awe of what I had just witnessed was out of my scope of understanding. How had the children even heard the teacher speak? Amidst the noise and the chaos, no one was paying attention or so it seemed and yet, a calm voice speaking the word brought order, calm and peace to this room of children and adults. I suspect that all of us doing this thing for the first time were amazed. Those parents who were veterans of this kind of thing just took it for granted. The teacher speaks and her students listen and respond. It was a beautiful thing.

 

Jesus said that He is the good shepherd and He knows His sheep and they know Him, just as He and the Father know each other. Jesus reminds us in this scripture that the sheep know Jesus by His voice, a voice that offers safety, calm, hope, peace, and life. No uncertainty or surprise in His voice.

 

The chaos that surrounds us yesterday and today, and for sure tomorrow and many more tomorrows to come, with the quarantining, social connecting while staying safely distant, the wonder about whether we can find paper products or hand sanitizer, the worry about health, family, jobs, economy, home schooling, babysitting and day care, and other important things, is deafening to our ears and our minds and our hearts. It is easy these days to be overwhelmed. But let’s step back for a moment and close our eyes, take a deep breath, and listen, really listen. Experience the beautiful sunrise each day, the sunsets, the rain that washes away the pollen and gives drink to the earth and all things living. Listen as the birds sing more clearly and lovelier than ever. Above us skies are so blue at times that is seems like an ocean with the clouds as waves. In the midst of all that causes us discomfort and makes us anxious, let us find joy and hope and love and grace in that still small voice from within that calls to us all, “Be still and know that I am God … The Lord of Hosts is with us, the God of Jacob is our refuge" (Psalm 46). The Shepherd speaks and the sheep hear His voice and just like a classroom of kindergarteners, suddenly there is order, calm, and the knowledge of safety and security. God is here. He is here in the kindness of strangers and neighbors. He is here in the sacrifice of medical teams and first responders. He is here as we look at the unseen enemy virus and choose love and calm and faith over chaos and fear. God is here! Listen!

 

Please pray with me.

Precious Lord, speak words of hope and promise to us and calm us that we may hear you above the noise and the chaos of this world. Pour out your Spirit upon us that by your grace, and in your care, we may be instruments of that grace and love in our homes, and our communities and wherever you find us each day. Bring us through this valley of the shadow and walk with us as we emerge stronger and more connected than before. Bless us with love and health and hope. May we who know the joy of the resurrection promise paid for this day on the cross, share God’s love, grace and good news in the living of our lives for God and family and neighbor. Amen.

Maundy Thursday, April 9

By Ms. Elizabeth (Libby) Sherman

Beloved daughter of Pastor Ernie and Annie Worman

 

"Now faith is confidence in what we hope for and assurance about what we do not see. This is what the ancients were commended for. Some faced jeers and flogging, and even chains and imprisonment. They were put to death by stoning; they were sawed in two; they were killed by the sword. They went about in sheepskins and goatskins, destitute, persecuted and mistreated — the world was not worthy of them. They wandered in deserts and mountains, living in caves and in holes in the ground. These were all commended for their faith, yet none of them received what had been promised, since God had planned something better for us so that only together with us would they be made perfect." — Hebrews 11:1-2, 36-40


If you haven’t heard my father’s Palm Sunday sermonette, I encourage you all to check out the quick 5-minute video on the Newberry College Facebook page. He is much more articulate and inspirational than I am about to be, and he mentions the first verse of this week’s passage, “Now faith is confidence in what we hope for and assurance about what we do not see."

   
Here’s my take on today’s passage. The writer of Hebrews 11, most commonly thought to be Paul, goes on for 40 verses to describe the superheroes of scripture, the titans of the Old Testament, and the protagonists of piety. Abraham, Moses, Noah, Rahab, and more all had so much faith or “confidence is what we hope for and assurance of what we do not see” that they accomplished great feats.

 

Some of those faithful were tortured and died for that faith. What makes their faith even more impressive is that they didn’t have the example of Jesus Christ to emulate. They hadn’t yet seen the promise fulfilled of our Lord and Savior, dying for our sins. These were people relying on their faith alone, willing to put everything on the line in their earthly life for the ultimate hope of one day experiencing a heavenly life eternal. 


So, what does this mean for us? Am I telling you that you need to be tortured for your faith to prove your conviction? Absolutely not. Do you need to build an ark or sacrifice your firstborn to demonstrate your devotion? Please don’t. This is a strange time for all of us. Today our faith calls us to have hope that we will get through this physically separated, but together in spirit. To find new ways to connect without placing our vulnerable community members at risk. Maybe it’s going back to writing letters and thrilling your mother with your handwriting, hosting a virtual Easter party, playing scrabble with your friends through the internet. You say you’re great at math? You can tutor someone remotely. Learn to crochet, find that guitar you’ve got in the attic, pick up one of the books in your growing “to read” pile or even start your own novel, find out the secret to the world’s best pancakes, sing hymns and find an online service that makes your heart sing! 


Please don’t lose faith, brothers and sisters, for we have seen the sacrifice of Jesus Christ, our Lord and Savior. We don’t have to wonder. We know that tomorrow is Good Friday, the BEST Friday, and we will start a tradition that culminates in the celebration of our promise fulfilled. Take care of your families and yourselves. We may not be wearing goatskins and wandering in the desert, but our hope and faith is no less needed. Staying at home, sitting on the couch, and watching TV has never been more important. 

 

Dear Heavenly Father: Send us your Holy Spirit as we enter this special weekend, that we may be bolstered in our faith, both in your love and in our community’s ability to heal, persevere and reunite. Amen.

Wednesday, April 8

By the Rev. Michael Price

Grace Lutheran Church, Prosperity, S.C.

 

“For now I know that you fear God, since you have not withheld your son, your favored one, from Me.” — Genesis 22:12

 

Sacrificing human lives contradicts faith, worship, and morality. Even as that is true, the history and culture during Genesis’ time left enough room to explore that 1) God would command such a thing and 2) such obedience is a triumph of faith. Isaac was for Abraham a miracle son, a son not expected but who was born to officially carry on the lineage as promised by God. Everything about Isaac represented for Abraham everything he loved and held dear. To be willing to hand all of that over is indeed an act of trust, and one that I can appreciate. And it brings to my mind that there are many people just in Newberry County alone who know the pain of losing children they love, and what sacrifice it is for their own hearts. The faith it takes to move forward in those harsh realities should be celebrated.

 

Now it is time to walk ahead in God’s journey. We walk ahead to the source of the season of Lent, to the cross of Jesus Christ.

 

Upon the cross hangs God’s favored and only Son. This event will come to be called a sacrifice made by Christ and by God as a once-and-for-all act of salvation. That’s what it is, and it is more.

 

Humans bringing sacrifices for God is the assumed practice from Genesis all the way through to the Gospels. God sacrificing for humans is another matter entirely; it’s unheard of. To say that God is sacrificing for human beings flips the reality of religion inside out and upside down. Sacrifice, as we’ve explored, is at the heart of the relationship people have with God, the way people worship and love God. To say that now God is the one doing the sacrificing dispenses with temples, altars, religious systems, and all the rest.

 

The curtain of the temple was torn in two, graves were cracked open, hell’s gates were sprung, because God made a sacrifice, an act of devotion, faithfulness, and love toward the whole world. No one saw it coming, because no one even thought to imagine, as they sacrificed and worshipped regularly, that God would sacrifice for humans.

 

The hymn "Great God Your Love Has Called Us Here" in verse 3 says: “We strain to glimpse your mercy seat / and find you kneeling at our feet.”

 

Let us pray.

It is finished, Holy and Almighty God. You have done it. Take our lives and shape them with your sacrificial love we see upon the cross of your Son Jesus. Amen.

Tuesday, April 7

By the Rev. Michael Price

Grace Lutheran Church, Prosperity, S.C.

 

Today let us set aside the specific command to Abraham to sacrifice his son Isaac and focus solely on sacrifice in everyday practice during the time of Genesis.

 

Have you ever thought about how much prayer is assumed in the life of a religious person today? Perhaps more than any other practice (including regular worship, studying of holy writings, or giving of time or money), prayer is the assumed practice of a religious individual today. And this includes just about any religion, be it Hindu, Buddhist, Taoist, Christian, Islamic, or Jewish. If you’re religious, you pray. This simple expectation defines everyday religiosity in our cultural mindset. Prayer is what you ask for from a religious (or “spiritual”) person when you’re facing a difficult time. It is a practice that has a multitude of characteristics: thanksgiving, adoration, lamentation, intercession, confession, meditation, etc. Prayer is the measuring stick of the relationship you have with the sacred or divine.

 

Now imagine with me another simple expectation of religious people of another day. Imagine you live in a time when the cultural expectation of a religious individual was not their prayer, but rather their sacrifice. If you’re religious in this day, you sacrifice. It too has a variety of characteristics. You might sacrifice to give thanks, or to simply adore the divine, or to appeal to them for good food and health, or to confess a wrong you’ve done, or simply to grow closer to the divine. It too is practiced by all kinds of religions: Greek, Roman, eastern, polytheists, monotheists, etc. It too was the measuring stick of one’s relationship with the divine. This is the predominant mindset of everyone in the known world during the time Genesis was written: if you’re religious, you sacrifice.

 

God’s commands about sacrifice in Leviticus were written with such clarity and simplicity that it took the guesswork out of the sacrificial system. Before God’s simple commands, a very human anxiety crept in that caused sacrificing to spiral out of control. Is this god mad at me? Sacrifice more! Did I benefit from this god last harvest? Sacrifice more! Did I do something wrong? Sacrifice more! Am I a good person? Sacrifice more! Because of God’s commands in Leviticus, such anxiety was taken away for God’s people by clarity and simplicity of execution. Such commands were a welcome voice of calm in an otherwise anxious system.

 

And it mattered what you sacrificed. According to the sacrificial laws as written in Leviticus, it mattered for instance that an animal sacrifice be “without blemish.” This essentially means that the sacrificed animal would be the most prized animal you possess. And this, maybe more than anything else, meant to demonstrate just how deserving the divine was for the sacrificer.

 

Sacrifice, when practiced simply and in faith, can be a holy event. Focusing solely on animal, crop, or wealth sacrifices, consider what trust it must take to watch those choice goods that can mean the difference between survival and death to burn on an altar. You toil and labor to make sure you and your family survive. And this one thing, this unblemished, choice source of food and survival burns before your eyes. Sacrifice, in and of itself, is a practice of recognition and trust. One recognizes the uncontrollable nature of life, and trust mysteriously wakes up in the midst of that recognition. Sacrifice, for many, was a source of uninhibited truth: every moment we live on the precipice of existence and non-existence. It brings into clarity our own life’s smallness, and by contrast, God’s bigness.

 

In lieu of offering a prayer of words for today’s devotion, I invite you to enter into 2 minutes of uninterrupted silence, inhaling and exhaling slowly and fully, paying attention to your heartbeat. As you inhale, thank God for your breath. As you exhale, trust God for the next breath. As you become more aware of your heartbeat, thank God for its beating and trust God for its beats into the future.

Monday, April 6

By the Rev. Michael Price

Grace Lutheran Church, Prosperity, S.C.

 

Genesis Chapter 22 is the Binding of Isaac (the Akedah in Hebrew). God commands Abraham to take his only son Isaac — whom Abraham loves — and prepare to sacrifice him.

 

I doubt I need to tell you how difficult and controversial this particular biblical story is. Let’s talk about the nature of the difficulty. And this has to do with the authority of the Bible. I am sure there are those who might be reading or hearing this who consider the Bible’s authority as literal and outright. “The Bible says it; I believe it; that settles it.” Of all the chapters in the Bible, this one in particular might present the single-most devastating challenge to that way of approaching the Bible. However, I’d like to propose another approach to the Bible’s authority in our lives. Instead of a simplistic literal interpretation of the whole, perhaps a text like this one invites us into a new relationship with the Bible itself. This story is not a moral tale of extreme obedience, or maybe more accurately, it is not that alone. Maybe, just maybe, the Bible’s authority is more dialogical, meaning it is not primarily instructing us what to do, but it is primarily talking through with us the depth and complexity of faith.

 

I see two possibilities in how people respond to this story (or any Bible passage for that matter). One is ignorance. Simply gloss over it, ignore it, or (and I really believe this belongs in the same camp) come up with a hard and fast interpretation that cannot be questioned. In other words, don’t put a lot of care into thinking or talking through it. The second possibility is to engage it the way the Bible is meant to be engaged, a source of holy mystery explored, debated, prodded, reacted to, observed, reflected upon, heard, and repeated by dedicated humans together.

 

It’s reprehensible to consider human sacrifice (or even attempted human sacrifice) as some kind of moral lesson. I’ll be blunt. Abraham is not a hero to me in this story, and on many days neither is God. Nevertheless, I cannot deny that listening out for God’s voice often means leaving everything you know and everything you identify with, including family and familiar livelihoods, the people and life you love. Abraham left his home and kindred as his first act of obedient faith to God’s calling. Now God is asking Abraham to leave the family and lineage of his future in order to trust God. That dynamic of faith should never be lost on us when we encounter this story. God interrupts our lives’ patterns, sometimes drastically so.

 

And such an observation — that God interrupts our patterns — can never be the whole of the interpretation of this text. The sheer force and provocative thrust of this narrative forces us to not get too comfortable with any one way of reading it. I may not see God as a hero when God commands Abraham to sacrifice Isaac, but God is still God. What I mean is, God is still a force uncontrolled by me, and that truth will never change.

 

And on and on it goes: the questions, the readings, the prodding, the reacting, the debating, the exploring, the interpreting. This engagement together through the ages reveals God more than anything. God’s holiness is known in the tensions it presents to our patterns of life, thinking, and faith. When the Bible takes away any chance to be surprised or disturbed or challenged or changed by it, it has lost its power and authority. Conversely, it’s when we are disturbed or surprised or challenged or changed that these texts hold sway over us.

 

In lieu of offering a prayer of words for today’s devotion, I invite you to enter into two minutes of uninterrupted silence, inhaling and exhaling slowly and fully, paying attention to your heartbeat. As you inhale, thank God for your breath. As you exhale, trust God for the next breath. As you become more aware of your heartbeat, thank God for its beating and trust God for its beats into the future.

Friday, April 3

By the Rev. James Henricks

Summer Memorial Lutheran Church, Newberry S.C.

 

"'This is my covenant, which you shall keep, between me and you and your offspring after you: Every male among you shall be circumcised. You shall circumcise the flesh of your foreskins, and it shall be a sign of the covenant between me and you. Throughout your generations every male among you shall be circumcised when he is eight days old, including the slave born in your house and the one bought with your money from any foreigner who is not of your offspring.'" — Genesis 17:10-12

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Today is my last day of my three-day devotion on the 17th chapter of Genesis. On day one, I emphasized this covenant is, above anything else, a gift and a promise from God. On the second day, I emphasized the everlasting nature of this covenant, and how ultimately, God is the only one who can uphold an eternal promise. Today, I finally look at what is expected from us – what does this covenant between God and Abraham mean for us today?

 

Here I want to point out: as with any reading from scripture, it is the Christian teaching that we only understand scripture fully with the knowledge of the resurrection of Jesus Christ as the beginning and end of the Christian faith. As so much of this 17th chapter of Genesis is devoted to circumcision as the human response to this covenant, I want to point out how St. Paul interprets this in the light of Christ’s actions: circumcision was a sign of faithfulness to the covenant. It is itself not the act which guarantees, but is the action that demonstrates faith in God and therefore receives the promise. Romans 4 says that Abraham “Received the sign of circumcision as a seal of the righteousness that he had by faith while he was still uncircumcised.” The promise to Abraham came through faith. 

 

As Christians, living under the New Covenant found in Christ, our marker for belonging has changed. We recognize Holy Baptism as the sign of this new covenant that marks us as belonging to the Christian body of faith. Yet what is the same, whether the act was circumcision or baptism, is the faith that precedes the action. God has spoken to us through the Gospel, enlightened us with God’s gift, and called us in the true faith along with the whole Christian Church on earth. Our faith – the result of God’s faithfulness to us – is the connection to our covenant with God; it is itself what we share with Abraham.

 

Faith is this gift and promise of God, the grantor of this covenant. It is the everlasting covenant to which God will always remain faithful. It is the reception of the greatest gift which we have ourselves received.

 

Will you pray with me?

Gracious God, by faith you gave the covenant to Abraham; by faith you led your people through the desert; you sustained your people in exile and ultimately sent your Son so that through his works all may come to you. Draw us in deeper to your covenantal promises. Inspire us and sustain us in our faith, that we may live as a light to the world and walk in your ways. In your most Holy Name we pray, Amen.

Thursday, April 2

By the Rev. James Henricks

Summer Memorial Lutheran Church, Newberry S.C.

 

“'As for me, this is my covenant with you: You shall be the ancestor of a multitude of nations. No longer shall your name be Abram, but your name shall be Abraham; for I have made you the ancestor of a multitude of nations. I will make you exceedingly fruitful; and I will make nations of you, and kings shall come from you. I will establish my covenant between me and you, and your offspring after you throughout their generations, for an everlasting covenant, to be God to you and to your offspring after you. And I will give to you, and to your offspring after you, the land where you are now an alien, all the land of Canaan, for a perpetual holding; and I will be their God.'” — Genesis 17:4-8

 

Yesterday, I began my three-day devotion looking at Genesis 17. I spoke about how this covenant between God and Abraham is best understood as a royal grant – something God has given. This covenant is a unidirectional promise – the promise from God to Abraham and the faithful Hebrew people.

 

Today, I want to look at the nature of that covenant, and how all of this is promised to Abraham. To do this, I want to focus on HOW this is promised, over and above WHAT is promised. We all know what is promised: numerous descendants, the land of Israel, and later, God includes the use of these numerous people in this land as a blessing to the whole world. What is interesting to me is how God promises this.

 

As we look at the how, the first thing to point out is the permanence of this covenant. This is an everlasting covenant. Just as I spoke yesterday that this covenant is a grant from God, we see this theme continued today: Only God can keep this covenant. Humans, including the long-living Abraham, are not everlasting, and our time on earth will come to an end. This everlasting covenant is upheld by God, and God alone.

 

Though the generations can continue in faithfulness, each generation can only be faithful in their part. The story of humanity and its relationship with God, as evidenced in Scripture, has always been an up-and-down relationship. One of the most common narratives in the Old Testament is the people turning away from God, bad things happen, and then a return to the God who rescues the faithful. This is how this promise looks in action – God is faithful in spite of the unfaithful people. This everlasting promise of God cannot be broken, and is always open to those who hear it.

             

Will you pray with me?

Gracious God, you made a covenant with Abraham that is everlasting. As we now, heirs of that covenant turn to you in prayer, we ask that you remind us of your constant faithfulness to us; that you remind us always of your presence with us, and that you guide us towards a faithful life. In your most holy name we pray. Amen. 

Wednesday, April 1

By the Rev. James Henricks

Summer Memorial Lutheran Church, Newberry S.C.

 

"When Abram was ninety-nine years old, the Lord appeared to Abram, and said to him, 'I am God Almighty; walk before me, and be blameless. And I will make my covenant between me and you, and will make you exceedingly numerous.'" — Genesis 17:1-2

 

Churches like to use the word ‘covenant,’ or at least that’s been my experience. Every youth group I was a part of had a covenant, which to us meant a list of rules we agreed to follow. When I worked as a counselor at one of the Lutheran Church’s summer camps, each week I sat down with my group of campers and we made our own covenant to guide our behavior for the week. Beyond youth programs, I’ve heard the word covenant used in church councils, stewardship campaigns, and more. In each of these contexts, the idea of a covenant is usually something like an agreement or a contract, or more simply for youth, it becomes the list of rules.

 

While that basic understanding is true, stepping into the context of Abraham reveals a deeper understanding of what this covenant between God an Abraham is. In the ancient world, there were two distinct types of covenants: one which was a covenant between equals; the other between a person with more power than another. This covenant between God and Abraham is the second. So we might be better off to think of this covenant in terms of a royal grant rather than a mutual agreement. This covenant is a promise given to Abraham and his descendants. It flows from God to Abraham – one direction, not two.

 

While it is true that God does name expectations of Abraham to live up to the covenant, there is an important reminder in this text for us this Lenten season. While we might give something up or take on an added spiritual practice as we prepare ourselves to hear again the good news of Christ’s resurrection, humanity has never earned the gifts of God. Abraham received God’s promise in the same way we receive the gift that is offered through Christ; while there are proper receptions of this and while this gift has implications for how we live, it is never something we earn.

 

Will you pray with me?


Gracious God, you gave the promise to Abraham and Sarah and established a covenant with your people. Guide us to live as a people of the promise, as the heirs to the new covenant found in Jesus Christ, that the whole world may know Christ’s redeeming love. Shape us in your way, and make us your people who live out that promise given so long ago. In your name we pray, Amen.

Tuesday, March 31

By Dr. Krista E. Hughes

Director of the Muller Center at Newberry College

 

“The angel of the Lord found [Hagar] by a spring of water in the wilderness, the spring on the way to Shur … The angel of the Lord said to her, ‘Return to your mistress, and submit to her.’ The angel of the Lord also said to her, ‘I will so greatly multiply your offspring that they cannot be counted for multitude.’ And the angel of the Lord said to her, ‘Now you have conceived and shall bear a son; you shall call him Ishmael, for the Lord has given heed to your affliction.’” — Genesis 16:7, 9-11 

 

Today we enter the wilderness with Hagar. A young woman, possibly a teen, impregnated by the elderly husband of her elderly mistress, she has fled from Sarai’s harsh treatment. She has been violated and abused and now finds herself facing the unknown on top of the unknown. Womanist theologians — that is, black women theologians — have claimed Hagar as their own by reflecting on her use as a slave and surrogate mother. Their work calls us to engage this story from Hagar’s perspective. There is much we can learn if we do so. 

 

In light of the COVID-19 pandemic, I invite us to focus on Hagar’s encounter with the angel of the Lord and her decision to return to Abram and Sarai despite her legitimate fears. Womanist theologians Delores Williams and Monica Coleman have both linked Hagar’s decision to the concept of “making a way out of no way.” When no way appears in the wilderness, the angel of the Lord comes and says, “Oh, but there is a way. It will be imperfect. It will not be easy. But it will ultimately provide security for you and your child when he arrives.” And so Hagar takes the uncomfortable step of returning to her masters.

 

The lesson here is that God provides and guides even in the fact of seemingly impossible options. This is not about staying in or returning to a dangerous situation. It is about trying to put on eyes of faith that can help us discern paths that might not have been obvious at first. It is about accepting that God’s accompaniment through troubled times does not necessarily eliminate the troubles. Instead, it is the assurance of God’s holy care in the very midst of those. 

 

This seems like a healthy way to approach the current pandemic crisis, whose contours remain largely unknown. We do not know what path it will take, who exactly will suffer, and how long it will last. Some of us are being asked to shelter in our homes and, going against our usual instincts in a time of crisis, not gathering with beloved community. These sacrifices pale in comparison to those on the front lines of course. Collectively we find ourselves in the wilderness. May we hold fast to the faith that God is with us and that, when we feel most lost, God will open up “a way out of no way.”

 

Prayer: Everlasting God, you dwell and move and find us even in the wildnernesses of our lives. During this time of uncertainty, open our hearts to your tender presence and our eyes to pathways we might not readily see. Amen. 

Monday, March 30

By Dr. Krista E. Hughes

Director of the Muller Center at Newberry College

 

“So, after Abram had lived for ten years in the land of Canaan, Sarai, Abram’s wife, took Hagar the Egyptian, her slave-girl, and gave her to her husband Abram as a wife. He went in to Hagar, and she conceived; and when she saw that she had conceived, she looked with contempt on her mistress. Then Sarai said to Abram, ‘May the wrong done to me be on you! I gave my slave-girl to your embrace, and when she saw that she had conceived, she looked on me with contempt. May the Lord judge between you and me!’ But Abram said to Sarai, ‘Your slave-girl is in your power; do to her as you please.’ Then Sarai dealt harshly with her, and she ran away from her.” — Genesis 16:3-6

 

Yesterday I posed the question of what the story of Genesis 16 might have to teach us about the pandemic crisis we are facing as a nation and a world. I suggested that although the contours of the stories are different, what they share is a context of uncertainty and grief. What might the characters teach us about relationships and faith in such a context?

 

Today let’s look at Sarai. In many ways this story is hers more than Abram’s. She goads him about not having conceived children and hands over her slave-girl Hagar as a surrogate. Yet when Hagar actually conceives, Sarai flies into a jealous rage. Her aggression toward Hagar is sufficient to drive the young girl away. 

 

This is not a flattering portrait to say the least. It turns out that the emotional emptiness of being barren cannot be cured by a surrogate, especially a justifiably unwilling surrogate. It only makes matters worse. Although this story is often used to illustrate Abram’s and Sarai’s lack of faith in God’s promises, it is no less a disturbing tale of unsatisfied people using a powerless person for their own ends. 

 

Many of us in the U.S., whatever our station in life, live in relative privilege. In 2020 we live in an on-demand culture. If we want it, whatever “it” is, we can generally acquire it—quickly and often cheaply. Yet we rarely see who or what pays the price for this ease. 

 

The national emergency upon us is going to disrupt many of our habits of entitlement.

 

How will we react? Like Sarai and Abram, who use more vulnerable others for their own ends? Or might we think along more relational lines, understanding that our own sacrifices can add up to a lot? Each one of us is called to sacrifice so that collectively we might guard the lives of those who are more vulnerable. Let us heed that call.

 

Prayer: Generous God, even when we are generally good people, it is so easy to put ourselves before others, especially during times of uncertainty and anxiety. Remind us that you call us to community and to love of neighbor. Stir us to compassion and guide us to be, in the words of Martin Luther, “little Christs to one another.” Amen.

Friday, March 27

By Dr. Krista E. Hughes

Director of the Muller Center at Newberry College

 

“Now Sarai, Abram’s wife, bore him no children. She had an Egyptian slave-girl whose name was Hagar, and Sarai said to Abram, ‘You see that the Lord has prevented me from bearing children; go in to my slave-girl; it may be that I shall obtain children by her.’ And Abram listened to the voice of Sarai.” — Genesis 16:1-2

 

The 40 days of Lent are said to be inspired by the 40 days of Jesus wandering in the wilderness. This, in turn, evokes the decades that the Israelites wandered in the desert. With the COVID-19 pandemic worsening by the day, we in the U.S. find ourselves in our own wilderness, wondering about the journey ahead and where it will lead us.

 

What lessons does Genesis 16 offer to help us navigate this unfamiliar terrain that currently has no clear end in sight? This chapter tells us about Abram’s and Sarai’s efforts, at very advanced ages, to conceive a child. Sarai gives her slave-girl Hagar over to Abram to serve as a surrogate. When Hagar successfully conceives however, Sarai’s jealous rage ultimately drives Hagar into the wilderness to fend for herself. 

 

It may seem that this story has little to do with our current situation. Yet insofar as it offers some powerful “character studies” in a context of uncertainty and grief, it might provide some illumination for how we might face the situation before us. Life has not unfolded for Abram and Sarai the way they expected—even the way they had understood God to promise. We may find ourselves feeling similarly right now. 

 

Monday and Tuesday we will explore these connections and especially tap into the unique wisdom of Hagar, the one character who spends time in the wilderness. God is with her, and she trusts that holy presence in powerful and surprising ways. May we do the same.

 

Prayer: Gracious God, we find ourselves in a time of wilderness as we face a global pandemic now hitting our own communities. Move your Spirit in our hearts that we may know your abiding presence and tender care. Amen.

Thursday, March 26

By the Rev. Dr. Christy Wendland

Associate Dean of Academic Affairs

 

"When the sun had gone down and it was dark, a smoking fire pot and a flaming torch passed between these pieces. On that day the LORD made a covenant with Abram, saying, 'To your descendants I give this land, from the river of Egypt to the great river, the river Euphrates, the land of the Kenites, the Kenizzites, the Kadmonites, the Hittites, the Perizzites, the Rephaim, the Amorites, the Canaanites, the Girgashites, and the Jebusites.'”  — Genesis 15:17-21

 

This section of Genesis 15 is the final part of God’s promise to Abram and the part that has caused much controversy over the centuries. If the land was promised to  Abram and his descendants, why can other people live there? What happens to the people who invade this land in the Bible? What authority does this promise carry today, given the conflicts in the Middle East? There are no easy answers to these questions. The questions about boundaries and promises has caused many millions of people to lose their lives in the millennia since God made this promise to Abram.

            

I can think of many times in which my promise to one of my children caused problems with the other child. Like when I promise to buy some clothes for one and the other complains because they didn’t get anything. But to the recipient of the promise, life is good.

 

In spite of how people have interpreted these words of God to Abram over the years, Abram was the recipient of a great promise. The land, marked in blue in the picture, would belong to him and his family. I suppose that promise caused angst and disappointment in other nations. It certainly has caused wars throughout time. But Abram was chosen. Why? We will never know.

 

The stories that follow Gen. 15 depict Abram’s reaction to this promise. How did he live his life? Genesis 16 shows him being a liar and almost getting his family killed while trying to save them. Genesis 22 depicts a faithful Abraham who is willing to sacrifice his own son in order to obey God’s command. The book of Hebrews lifts Abraham up as an example of profound faith. Abram’s life was his attempt to live in the promises God made to him.

 

This is what we are called to do as well. God loves us and promises us eternal life. We are given forgiveness and mercy and salvation. It is up to us to live out those promises in the way we live our lives. Though we will mess up at times, like Abram did, we can make our life a proclamation of the promises given to us.

 

Gracious God, you have given us many who have given their lives in witness to your love and truth. Inspire us to be like Abraham, to live in our lives in your promise of eternal life and to proclaim your love to the world. Amen.

Wednesday, March 25

By the Rev. Dr. Christy Wendland

Associate Dean of Academic Affairs

 

"He said to him, 'Bring me a heifer three years old, a female goat three years old, a ram three years old, a turtledove, and a young pigeon. He brought him all these and cut them in two, laying each half over against the other; but he did not cut the birds in two' ... Then the LORD said to Abram, 'Know this for certain, that your offspring shall be aliens in a land that is not theirs, and shall be slaves there, and they shall be oppressed for four hundred years; but I will bring judgment on the nation that they serve, and afterward they shall come out with great possessions.'” — Genesis 15:8-10, 13-14

 

This is the only place in the Bible where we see this strange and gruesome covenant ceremony and there are many theories as to what it means. One plausible explanation is that by cutting the animals, the participants understand that they will face the same consequences should they break the covenant. I suppose the thought of being cut into pieces would compel one to keep their end of the bargain. Another explanation is that this is a blood oath between God and Abram that signifies the power of the relationship and the promises given as part of that relationship. In the midst of this odd ritual and a terrifying dream state God made an additional promise to Abram. Abram’s descendants will be slaves for a long time – 400 years – but they will be freed from slavery and they will be prosperous.

 

What is unusual in this promise is the amount of time the promise will take to be fulfilled. Can you imagine someone making a promise to you and then telling you that you will need to wait 400 years for the promise to come true? And the only consolation is that you can die peacefully knowing that the promise would indeed be fulfilled? Would you believe them? I don’t think I would and I’m pretty sure that I would not start making preparations for the promise to be fulfilled.

 

I can remember before cell phones, waiting hours or days before someone returned my phone call. Or when I was a child, writing a letter to a pen pal in South Korea and waiting eagerly for months to receive a return letter. I’m not very good at waiting, but I did learn how to wait. Now, it seems we live in a world of instant gratification. Ever get angry when someone doesn’t text you back right away? Or when you can’t find what you want in the store so you visit Amazon instead? Because you have to have it now. 

 

Abram believed. We saw that in the first part of this chapter. Abram came to believe that God would keep God’s promises, no matter when those promises would be fulfilled. So, for Abram, faith was not so much about belief in promises that would be fulfilled later, but about what to do in the meantime. So, he listened to God; he had a son and enlarged his family, he took care of his wife, and he led his people to live in the land that God promised to him.

 

As Christians, we wait, sometimes impatiently, for the coming of Christ, for a new creation. Let’s wait like Abram and live out our faith in the promises of God.

 

God, help us to wait patiently and with great faith for the promises you have given to us. Amen.

Tuesday, March 24

By the Rev. Dr. Christy Wendland

Associate Dean of Academic Affairs

 

"Abram said, 'O Lord God, what will you give me, for I continue childless, and the heir of my house is [the slave] Eliezer from Damascus?' . . . But the word of the Lord came to him, 'This man shall not be your heir; no one but your very own issue shall be your heir.' He brought him outside and said, 'Look toward heaven and count the stars, if you are able to count them.' Then he said to him, 'So shall your descendants be.' And he believed the LORD." — Genesis 15:2, 4-6a

 

Abram, or Abraham as he was to be renamed later, was worried. In a patriarchal, nomadic society, where men depended on sons to increase the family and its wealth and to watch over the family, and where a woman’s worth was determined by the number of sons she had, Abram was concerned because he didn’t have a son and he was getting old. God called him from his ancestral home to a new, unfamiliar place and promised him a new land that would belong to him and his many descendants (see Gen. 12:1-3 and Gen. 13:14-17). This promise to Abraham is one of the most fundamental promises in the Bible because it sets the stage for the continued relationship between God and the people of Israel. But here, today, Abram questioned this profound promise, basically asking God, “Why haven’t you done what you said you would do?”

 

Promises are tricky sometimes. We make promises based on the information we have at the time, but eventually we may not be able to follow through if circumstances change. Many of us have suffered the consequences of broken promises. And how many of us have had a child look at us with sad, pleading eyes, and say “but you promised!”?

 

Human beings may not always keep their promises, but God does. One only needs to read the Bible to see that when God makes a promise, God keeps it. That is always certain. As we enter the homestretch of Lent, the Easter promise of salvation awaits us. God’s promise to humanity is that God comes down to earth to meet us in our humanity, in our uncertainty, in our brokenness, amidst all the unfulfilled promises in our lives. And in doing so, in dying on the cross, in entering the profound baseness of our nature, Christ finds us and saves us. The promise is eternal life. It seems like an impossible promise, like the one God gave to Abraham. Can you be like Abraham and believe it?

 

God of the covenant, in the mystery of the cross you promise everlasting life to the world. Gather all peoples into your arms, and shelter us with your mercy, that we may rejoice in the life we share in your Son, Jesus Christ, our Savior and Lord. Amen.

Monday, March 23

By the Rev. Matthew Titus ’05

Lutheran Church of the Redeemer, Newberry, S.C.

 

"So he built an altar there to the Lord, who had appeared to him." — Genesis 12:7b

 

My in-laws have a vacation home in the Brevard, N.C., area and when my family and I get to go hang out there, we love to go on hikes and see waterfalls. Whenever I’m on those treks, I try to keep a keen eye out for those who have created markers of their time in that space of God’s creation. I intentionally look for those markers that are stacked rocks.

 

I love those markers and monuments.

 

I know that someone thought this space, this time, this area was special to them. Special enough that they took the time, energy, and patience to mark that spot in their life. I consider those places to be holy ground. 

 

God appeared to Abram, and he made sure that on his travels he would make those occasions and significant moments in his life and he’d build something. A sign and testament to those around him that this spot is indeed holy. Not only a holy physical place, but a holy moment in his life.

 

When I see those stacked and balanced rocks, I give a moment to pray for that person – that they find joy, healing, and guidance in their life as they need and desire it. 

 

It is also good for us to mark those places in our lives – both physically, emotionally, and spiritually – that we consider holy and important. It may be just a simple thing to those on the outside, but to you – that marker is profound.

 

Prayer: Lord God, you are with us always. You guide us to places where we don’t yet know the outcome. Along the way help us to see and feel your presence in our lives and travels. Guide us to mark those occasions perhaps physically in the world and spiritually in our hearts. Help us to hold on to those moments so that we might remember your presence with us always. Amen.

Friday, March 20

By the Rev. Matthew Titus ’05

Lutheran Church of the Redeemer, Newberry, S.C.

 

"So Abram went, as the Lord had told him; and Lot went with him. Abram was seventy-five years old when he departed from Haran."  — Genesis 12:4

 

Now, the thing that strikes me the most – after the vision from God that tells Abram to leave all that he knows and loves to search for a land that he doesn’t know where it’ll be – is that Abram is old(er).

 

Now, I know some individuals in their 70s who are incredibly fit, spry, and active. Today, 75 years-old doesn’t mean the same thing that it potentially did back in Abram’s time. But, those making incredible life changes in their supposed ‘twilight’ years is something to behold.

 

I enjoy hearing from the older folks in my church who take up a new hobby, a new cause, a new way to approach life. It is good to see people active, trying new things, and learning new ways to approach life. As a tech-enthusiast, my heart leaps for joy when I see older folks making life work on tablets, smartphones, and game consoles. It’s awesome.

 

What I gather from this brief text in Genesis, is that you are never too old for God to call you to something new. You aren’t. We are a people and a people of faith that continues to learn, grow, change, and evolve. We are created to be active, to live life, to venture into the unknown. And God is with us the entire time. Amen.

 

Prayer: Lord God, help us to remember that we are never too old to change. That we are never to frail to start something new. That we are never too old to be called by you into new ministry. Amen.

Thursday, March 19

By the Rev. Matthew Titus ’05

Lutheran Church of the Redeemer, Newberry, S.C.

 

"Now the Lord said to Abram, 'Go from your country and your kindred and your father’s house to the land that I will show you …'" — Genesis 12:1

 

Imagine today, someone told you that they had a vision from God and that they were moving to a far-off place because God told that person that that new land would be there’s to claim. I’d be willing to bet that you’d find that person a little odd, and if you cared for them, you would find some way to help them as they are apparently going through some pretty stressful times.

 

I’d be willing to bet that Abram’s friends had similar thoughts. What Abram was setting out to do was ludicrous. He was leaving all that he knew – culture, family, friendships, and more – and setting off to an unknown land. Venturing to a land that even he didn’t know where it was.

 

But, here’s the thing. What Abram does is ridiculous. It is. Yet, he still did it. Why? Because he trusted that God would be with him. Always. And God fulfilled that promise – even as we read later into the book of Genesis where that promise was fulfilled in unexpected ways.

 

I don’t know if God would ask us to do something similar today. I don’t. What I do know is that no matter what, God is going to be with us and I know that friends will pray for us and support us as best as they could.

 

I also know, that if our friends present us with scenarios and visions that remove them from all that they know, we may want to check up on them and see if everything is alright. That’s what friends do.

 

Prayer: Lord God, we don’t know what you’ll ask of us. But, in whatever it is, help us to see you present in it and remind us that you’ll be with us always. Amen.

Wednesday, March 18

By Dr. John Lesaine ’07

Assistant Dean for Academic Affairs

 

“And God said, 'This is the sign of the covenant I am making between me and you and every living creature with you, a covenant for all generations to come: I have set my rainbow in the clouds, and it will be the sign of the covenant between me and the earth. Whenever I bring clouds over the earth and the rainbow appears in the clouds, I will remember my covenant between me and you and all living creatures of every kind. Never again will the waters become a flood to destroy all life. Whenever the rainbow appears in the clouds, I will see it and remember the everlasting covenant between God and all living creatures of every kind on the earth.' So God said to Noah, 'This is the sign of the covenant I have established between me and all life on the earth.'” — Genesis 9:12-17 

 

I’ve had to sign many contracts in my day. I’ve been blessed to go to an awesome job, own a house, drive a car, and enjoy many other luxuries in life. One of the caveats of enjoying those luxuries is signing a contract or some sort of agreement. The contract is binding so that both parties must uphold their part of the deal. However, not all contracts are created equal.

 

Undeniably, the most powerful and important contract was the covenant GOD made between himself and his people. He put a rainbow in the sky as a sign that he would never destroy the earth by flood again. And of course, when GOD says something, you can take it directly to the bank. However, this covenant goes far beyond his promise to never destroy the earth by flood. This covenant indicates his willingness to take care of his people. This covenant indicates his willingness to protect his people. This covenant indicates GOD is close to his people and that he loves us unconditionally. Now that, my brothers and sisters, is the greatest contract of all time.  

 

Heavenly Father,

Thank you for your faithfulness. Thank you for your promise. Thank you for upholding your end of the promise. May we work faithfully to uphold our end. In Jesus' Name, Amen.

Tuesday, March 17

By Dr. John Lesaine ’07

Assistant Dean for Academic Affairs

 

“And for your lifeblood I will surely demand an accounting. I will demand an accounting from every animal. And from each human being, too, I will demand an accounting for the life of another human being. Whoever sheds human blood, by humans shall their blood be shed; for in the image of God has God made mankind. As for you, be fruitful and increase in number; multiply on the earth and increase upon it.” — Genesis 9:5-7

 

Everybody and everything is full of something. What are you full of? Are you full of GOD’s grace and love? Are you full of GOD’s favor? Are you full of his holy spirit? Just know that you are full of something and know that what is inside of you will definitely come out of you.

 

Continuing from yesterday’s devotion, we find another commandment GOD has given to Noah and his sons. This time he tells them to be fruitful and multiply on the earth. Why? He wants the earth to be filled with him. You may ask: wouldn’t the earth already be filled with GOD’s splendor? Of course, it already was. However, GOD needed the earth to be filled with mankind because it was mankind that was made in his image. He chose to make us in his image, not anything else, and that is something to get excited about. 

 

What’s even more exciting is how we are made in image but also uniquely made. GOD didn’t create us individually to be like anybody else. He made us so that we can be who he made us to be but to also exhibit his glory. As the earth is filled with GOD’s masterpieces (that means you and me), his glory is revealed and we can lift him up so that he can draw all men unto him. 

 

Heavenly Father,

Thank you for filling us with your love, grace, and mercy. Thank you for filling us with you. May we always continue to let our light shine so that you can shine.

In Jesus' Name, Amen.

Monday, March 16

By Dr. John Lesaine ’07

Assistant Dean for Academic Affairs

 

“Then God blessed Noah and his sons, saying to them, 'Be fruitful and increase in number and fill the earth. The fear and dread of you will fall on all the beasts of the earth, and all the birds in the sky, on every creature that moves along the ground, and on all the fish in the sea; they are given into your hands. Everything that lives and moves about will be food for you. Just as I gave you the green plants, I now give you everything.'” — Genesis 9:1-3

 

The favor of GOD is something serious. It truly is. How often do we receive things that we don’t deserve? The answer to that question is every day. Why do we receive the things that we don’t deserve? The answer to that question is because GOD loves us unconditionally. It is a great feeling to be loved by GOD. There is nothing like it.

 

Here we find GOD giving Noah and his sons a simple job to do: be fruitful and fill the earth. However, he makes it easy on them because he sets the stage for them. GOD tells them to do this but he also says that they will receive everything they need to get the job done. We can be rest assured that when GOD calls us to do something that he will give us everything that we need. We must keep in mind that what we think we need might not be what we need and that is why we must continue to trust GOD.

 

Heavenly Father, Thank you for your faithfulness. Thank you for the calling you have placed on each of us. Thank you for providing us with what we need to get the job done. In Jesus' Name, Amen.

Friday, March 13

By the Rev. Joanie Holden '11

St. Timothy Lutheran Church, Crystal River, Fla.

 

"Then the LORD said to him, 'Not so! Whoever kills Cain will suffer a sevenfold vengeance.' And the LORD put a mark on Cain, so that no one who came upon him would kill him." — Genesis 4:15

 

“Like Father, Like Son!” — AND AGAIN God foreshadows the future work of His son when He gives us a preview of the Life to come when He offers Cain life without fear of death. Jesus offers this same promise as He states in John 3:16, “God so loved the world that He gave His one and only son that whoever believes in him will not die but have eternal life.” Life without fear of death for a convicted premeditated murderer! This is grace not known in the world again until Jesus lives among us.

 

Continue to think about it: God physically lives among us only twice — in the garden at creation ("[Adam and Eve] heard the sound of the Lord GOD walking in the garden at the time of the evening breeze, and the man and his wife hid themselves from the presence of the Lord GOD among the trees of the garden." — Genesis 3:8) and in Jesus, God Incarnate, in the Gospels. Both times, the status quo is turned upside down and God does something new and unexpected.

 

Lent is an important time of praising God and thanking God for His unconditional love and grace, offered to everyone. We only have to open our hearts and accept the gift! But what makes it so hard for us is that this is a gift that we have to live in order to truly receive. Can we live it and offer the same to everyone else?

 

Let us pray: Thank You, Redeeming Father, for purchasing our freedom with your own blood and gifting us the very lives we too often take for granted – ours and all of those around us. Help us to graciously accept your gift and to share it with the world, all convicted and forgiven! Amen.

Thursday, March 12

By the Rev. Joanie Holden '11

St. Timothy Lutheran Church, Crystal River, Fla.

 

"Cain said to his brother Abel, 'Let us go out to the field.' And when they were in the field, Cain rose up against his brother Abel, and killed him. Then the LORD said to Cain, 'Where is your brother Abel?' He said, 'I do not know; am I my brother's keeper?' And the LORD said, 'What have you done? Listen; your brother's blood is crying out to me from the ground! And now you are cursed from the ground, which has opened its mouth to receive your brother's blood from your hand. When you till the ground, it will no longer yield to you its strength; you will be a fugitive and a wanderer on the earth.'" — Genesis 4:8-12

 

“Like Father, Like Son!” Once again, God gives us a foretaste of the feast to come as He forgives not only murder, but pre-meditated murder! Cain invites his brother Abel to go for a walk in the fields with him and then Cain murders Abel. Where many courts would have given the death sentence or confinement with whipping or some such punishment, God grants a measure of grace in that Cain will have a rough life, but he will be free to roam the land. Many years later, Jesus, hanging on the cross, will ask forgiveness for the very ones who put Him there, declaring, “forgive them for they know not what they do.”

 

Keep thinking about it: God physically lives among us only twice — in the garden at creation ("[Adam and Eve] heard the sound of the Lord GOD walking in the garden at the time of the evening breeze, and the man and his wife hid themselves from the presence of the Lord GOD among the trees of the garden." — Genesis 3:8) and in Jesus, God Incarnate, in the Gospels. Both times, the status quo is turned upside down and God does something new and unexpected.

 

Lent is an important time of self-examination and questioning: do we love others? Do we love even our enemy? Do we truly forgive, or just say we do? Both in the Garden and on the Cross – we hear words of love and grace.

 

Let us pray: Thank You, Creator Father, for offering Grace regardless of the sins we offer up to you and for comfort in the face of our overwhelming awareness of our unworthiness. Amen.

Wednesday, March 11

By the Rev. Joanie Holden '11

St. Timothy Lutheran Church, Crystal River, Fla.

 

"Now the man knew his wife Eve, and she conceived and bore Cain, saying, 'I have produced a man with the help of the LORD.' Next she bore his brother Abel. Now Abel was a keeper of sheep, and Cain a tiller of the ground. In the course of time Cain brought to the LORD an offering of the fruit of the ground, and Abel for his part brought of the firstlings of his flock, their fat portions. And the LORD had regard for Abel and his offering, but for Cain and his offering he had no regard. So Cain was very angry, and his countenance fell. — Genesis 4:1-5a

 

When I was asked to write three Lenten devotions on Genesis 4, I have to confess I was a bit beside myself. After all, stories of fratricide do not make me think of devotions or Easter. About the tenth time reading Genesis 4 and after much prayer, something felt very familiar in this story – “Like Father, Like Son!”

 

Think about it. God physically lives among us only twice – in the garden at creation ("[Adam and Eve] heard the sound of the Lord GOD walking in the garden at the time of the evening breeze, and the man and his wife hid themselves from the presence of the Lord GOD among the trees of the garden." Genesis 3:8) and in Jesus, God Incarnate, in the Gospels. Both times, the status quo is turned upside down and God does new and unexpected things.

 

In verses 1-5a, God gives preference to the younger of the sons, which is the opposite of how things were done in the world at that time (Foreshadowing of Jesus’ words that the first will be last and the last first). Eventually, it will be Seth, the third son, whose line will be the future of the family name and ancestors of Jesus.

 

Lent is an important time of reflection on God’s continual efforts to guide us into God’s ways as opposed to following the judgmental and status conscious ways of man. Man says the rich and powerful matter and will end up with everything. God says, no! The last will be first and the least will inherit the earth. The Spirit continues to remind us of all that The Father and The Son have said: Everyone is special, and the least are the most special.

 

Let us pray: Thank You Creator Father for giving every living thing worth from the very beginning of creation; for sending Jesus to personally deliver your Word, and for sending the Holy Spirit to remind us over and over that Jesus died for everyone and in His death makes us all one with the Father. Amen.

Tuesday, March 10

By Dr. Warren Moore

Professor of English

 

"And the Lord God said unto the serpent, 'Because thou hast done this, thou art cursed above all cattle, and above every beast of the field; upon thy belly shalt thou go, and dust shalt thou eat all the days of thy life: And I will put enmity between thee and the woman, and between thy seed and her seed; it shall bruise thy head, and thou shalt bruise his heel.' Unto the woman he said, 'I will greatly multiply thy sorrow and thy conception; in sorrow thou shalt bring forth children; and thy desire shall be to thy husband, and he shall rule over thee.' And unto Adam he said, 'Because thou hast hearkened unto the voice of thy wife, and hast eaten of the tree, of which I commanded thee, saying, 'Thou shalt not eat of it:' cursed is the ground for thy sake; in sorrow shalt thou eat of it all the days of thy life; Thorns also and thistles shall it bring forth to thee; and thou shalt eat the herb of the field; In the sweat of thy face shalt thou eat bread, till thou return unto the ground; for out of it wast thou taken: for dust thou art, and unto dust shalt thou return.' And Adam called his wife's name Eve; because she was the mother of all living. Unto Adam also and to his wife did the Lord God make coats of skins, and clothed them. And the Lord God said, 'Behold, the man is become as one of us, to know good and evil: and now, lest he put forth his hand, and take also of the tree of life, and eat, and live for ever:' Therefore the Lord God sent him forth from the garden of Eden, to till the ground from whence he was taken. So he drove out the man; and he placed at the east of the garden of Eden Cherubims, and a flaming sword which turned every way, to keep the way of the tree of life. — Genesis. 3:14-24

 

A few days ago, as we heard the story of the Fall of Man, we realized that if the story ended there, it would be tragedy. And on first reading of the chapter’s end, it does seem tragic. Adam and Eve will labor, and suffer, and die. They are sent out of the Garden to begin that long process. 

 

But our faith is not a tragic one. Tucked into the sentences God pronounces on the participants in the Fall, we are told that while evil may cause us pain, some future generation will overcome that evil once and for all, trampling the Serpent and its ilk into the dust once and for all. This, of course, is the miracle of Christ’s Incarnation, when God becomes Man and takes on the deadly punishment for sin despite being sinless Himself. The scales will be balanced, and the world made right. 

 

Yes, Lent is a time for reflection on our own wrongs and Christ’s suffering to redress those wrongs. But it should also be a time in which we reflect on the hope God gives us – that the darkness of Lent will be replaced by the empty tomb and the brightness of an Easter morning.

 

Our Father, we know we have earned the sorrows we face. But thank You for reminding us that they are not everything. Thank You for telling us that You will triumph over all our sorrows, even to the pain of death. In the Name of Your Son, Amen.

Monday, March 9

By Dr. Warren Moore

Professor of English

 

"And the eyes of them both were opened, and they knew that they were naked; and they sewed fig leaves together, and made themselves aprons. And they heard the voice of the Lord God walking in the garden in the cool of the day: and Adam and his wife hid themselves from the presence of the Lord God amongst the trees of the garden. And the Lord God called unto Adam, and said unto him, 'Where art thou?' And he said, 'I heard thy voice in the garden, and I was afraid, because I was naked; and I hid myself.' And he said, 'Who told thee that thou wast naked? Hast thou eaten of the tree, whereof I commanded thee that thou shouldest not eat?' And the man said, 'The woman whom thou gavest to be with me, she gave me of the tree, and I did eat.' And the Lord God said unto the woman, 'What is this that thou hast done?' And the woman said, 'The serpent beguiled me, and I did eat.' — Genesis 3:7-13

 

Aristotle described humanity as “the rational animal.” It might be more apt, however, to consider ourselves to be rationalizing animals. It is all too easy for us to find “reasons” for doing the things we know we shouldn’t do. The reasons, of course, are mere excuses, and we can come up with them both before and after we do the wrong thing.

 

When God confronts Adam and Eve in the Garden, He asks them if they have done something they knew they shouldn’t do. Adam says he did, but he blames Eve, and Eve blames the serpent in turn. Neither of the people John Milton called our first parents are willing to accept the truth that they have chosen to violate God’s ordinance – they have chosen to sin.

 

Lent is a time in which we force ourselves to acknowledge the wrongs we have done, and to acknowledge further that it is impossible for us to erase those wrongs through our own effort. It’s the time when we must abandon the excuses we make to God and to ourselves, and accept that we are sinners in need of salvation.

 

Lord, we have fallen short. We do what we should not, and we fail to do what we should. Help us to accept that responsibility, and to be grateful that instead of relying on our own excuses, we can turn to Your saving Love. In Your name we pray, Amen.

Friday, March 6

By Dr. Warren Moore

Professor of English

 

"Now the serpent was more subtil than any beast of the field which the Lord God had made. And he said unto the woman, 'Yea, hath God said, 'Ye shall not eat of every tree of the garden?' And the woman said unto the serpent, 'We may eat of the fruit of the trees of the garden: But of the fruit of the tree which is in the midst of the garden, God hath said, 'Ye shall not eat of it, neither shall ye touch it, lest ye die.' And the serpent said unto the woman, 'Ye shall not surely die: For God doth know that in the day ye eat thereof, then your eyes shall be opened, and ye shall be as gods, knowing good and evil.' And when the woman saw that the tree was good for food, and that it was pleasant to the eyes, and a tree to be desired to make one wise, she took of the fruit thereof, and did eat, and gave also unto her husband with her; and he did eat.  — Genesis 3:1-6

 

Some years ago, I read a statement that we can never make a society so perfect that we don’t have to try to be good. Our text today confirms that. Adam and Eve are placed in a literal paradise, where all their needs are met and their comfort and happiness seem absolute. They only have to follow a single rule. What could be easier?

 

But we know even this is too difficult. Eve and then Adam decide that the world God has given them is not enough, and in seeking more, they forfeit all they have, even their lives. 

 

If this were the end of the story, our lives would be both tragic and futile. During this Lenten season, we should reflect on the choices that would lead us that way, even as we are grateful that this is not the story’s end.

 

Heavenly Father, forgive us when we believe that we can improve on the gifts You have given us, and when we would replace Your wisdom with ours. In Jesus’ name we pray, Amen.

Thursday, March 5

By R. Annie Worman

Friend of Newberry College

 

God said, "It's not good for the Man to be alone; I'll make him a helper, a companion." So God formed from the dirt of the ground all the animals of the field and all the birds of the air. He brought them to the Man to see what he would name them. Whatever the Man called each living creature, that was its name. The Man named the cattle, named the birds of the air, named the wild animals; but he didn't find a suitable companion.  God put the Man into a deep sleep. As he slept he removed one of his ribs and replaced it with flesh. God then used the rib that he had taken from the Man to make Woman and presented her to the Man. The Man said, "Finally! Bone of my bone, flesh of my flesh! Name her Woman for she was made from Man." — Genesis 2:18-23

 

You may have heard my beloved husband, Pastor Ernie from Newberry College, preach on this passage. It is one of his favorite texts (I think perhaps that is the reason I got to write the Lenten devotion on it). He preaches that all these years, we ordinary people have been reading it with incorrect inflection. In his mind, and I agree, the reason there are exclamation marks is because Adam was so tired after seeing and naming all of the animals. None were truly suitable companions. Then God had him sleep, took a rib and made Eve and introduced her to Adam. Adam’s response? “FINALLY! Bone of my bone, flesh of my flesh!” Finally was spoken in a loud, joyful shout.

 

You see, that makes me smile to think of Adam joyfully greeting Eve and responding to God’s gift of another. If you haven’t thought of it recently, give a little prayer of thanks right now for the other in your life.

 

Lent is a time for self-reflection and contemplation. I suggest one subject might be gratitude. Thanks be to God for sending Jesus the Christ to save us from our sins! And thank you, my spouse, companion, partner for putting gas in the car. And thank you, my spouse, companion, partner for washing and drying and folding the laundry and putting it away. And thank you for working so hard so that we can have a roof over our heads and food to eat. And thank you for grocery shopping and cooking our meals. We have so much to be thankful for — our lives, our health, our gifts and talents, spouse, companion, partner, friends, family and loved ones.

 

In my self-reflection this week, I am going to work to speak a little more gently, do things with more kindness, be more patient and forgiving because God loved us so much that He created us and He sent His son, Jesus, to die on the cross for US! “It is not good for the Man to be alone...” Thank God for all the wonderful people in your life today.

 

Please pray with me.

Lord God, We thank you and praise you today for our spouses, companions, partners, friends, family, loved ones, and co-workers with us in the kingdom of God. Please continue to shower us with the guidance of your Holy Spirit and your grace and forgiveness. In Jesus' name we pray.  Amen.

Wednesday, March 4

By R. Annie Worman

Friend of Newberry College

 

"Then the Lord God formed a man from the dust of the ground and breathed into his nostrils the breath of life, and the man became a living being." — Genesis 2:7

 

Just one week ago was Ash Wednesday - the first day of our Lenten journey for 2020. As many of you were marked with a cross made of ashes on your forehead, you heard the words, “Remember that you are dust, and to dust you shall return.” I always hear the band Kansas’ song, “Dust in the Wind,” in my head on Ash Wednesday with the refrain, “All we are is dust in the wind.” As I have shared before, I always have music or a song playing in the background of my thoughts - my own personal soundtrack. That is one of the reasons I try to listen and remember positive songs. The thought of dust and Ash Wednesday go hand in hand for me.

 

Today’s Bible verse is the second creation story from Genesis Chapter 2. In today’s verse we have explained to us how Adam was formed, “...from the dust of the ground.” And God breathed into Adam, “the breath of life.” There are so many wonderful breath and breathe hymns and songs out there that I had a difficult time choosing one to reference. I chose Michael W Smith’s, “Breathe.” A snippet of the lyrics includes these profound words, “This is the air I breathe, Your holy presence living in me.” I feel that breathing in God’s holy presence this Lenten season is a great idea for today. Let me explain. During Lent, we are called to step back from the ordinary into the holy. We are called for a time of self examination while we ponder Jesus’s sacrifice on the cross for us and our salvation. Doesn’t that sound like a good time to take a deep breath, to take a really deep breath and feel the holy presence of God enter us? So, with me now - take that deep calming breath and feel just how alive you feel. In the Bible translation, “The Message,” by Eugene Peterson, the second part of today’s verse is, “The Man came alive - a living soul!” Isn’t that what we feel about ourselves as we breathe in the holy presence of God - our living, breathing soul?

 

We are dust and to dust we shall return, but until that day and moment, let’s celebrate the life that the Good Lord has given us and will give us in the kingdom to come.

 

Please pray with me.

Lord God,

I need to feel your holy presence fill me once again. I need to feel your overwhelming love and the power of your forgiveness in my life. Please continue your holy presence living in me. Amen.

Tuesday, March 3

By R. Annie Worman

Friend of Newberry College

 

"Heaven and Earth were finished, down to the last detail. By the seventh day God had finished his work. On the seventh day he rested from all his work. God blessed the seventh day. He made it a Holy Day Because on that day he rested from his work, all the creating God had done." — Genesis 2: 1-3

 

Here in the beginning of Genesis Chapter 2 is the end of the creation story told in Chapter 1. And here in the beginning of Chapter 2 of Genesis is the blessing of the seventh day, a Holy day, a day of rest.

 

We are already in the second week of the period called Lent in the Christian calendar. Lent is approximately six weeks or 40 days from Ash Wednesday leading up to Holy Thursday or Maundy Thursday of Holy Week before Easter. And Holy Thursday is the day of the Last Supper, the day of the very first Lord’s Supper or Holy Communion. In some traditions, Lent ends on Holy Saturday before Easter, either way it ends during Holy week.

 

This passage from the Bible however, is back at the beginning, at the end of the beginning, at the end of the creation of the world. We are at the Holy Day of rest. And Lent is a good time to speak of rest. In our noisy, busy, crowded lives, Lent is a time of self-reflection and examination. Some people “give up” certain foods or beverages or other things during Lent as a fasting exercise. Others renew their vows to read and study the Bible more or to spend more time in prayer. In order to spend time in prayer or contemplation, we need to “give up” a time period of watching TV or reading the news or playing a game or scrolling through something on the internet - for Lent. For Lent, we need to give our minds and bodies rest to be able to pray more fervently, study our Bibles with concentration, or to perform deep and meaningful self-reflection. Can you give yourself the permission to give yourself REST this Lenten 40 days? God said His day of rest is a Holy Day. Your time of rest can be a Holy time as well.

 

And speaking of Holy time, many of our local churches have added a second opportunity to meet together with God’s people on Wednesdays during Lent. Lent is the perfect time to attend regular, weekly worship, either Sunday or Wednesday or both. We worship the God who sent His beloved son, Jesus, to die a terrible death on the cross for us and our sins. If you have made excuses to miss church recently, come back to church this Lenten season. Regular attendance at church this Lent is a good idea. We are all sinners who have fallen short of the glory of God. Jesus calls us to forgive others and forgive ourselves. Consider adding some more Holy time and Holy time of rest to your discipleship this Lenten season.

 

Please pray with me:

Lord God, Thank you for creating this wonderful world for us. Thank you for sending you son, Jesus, to die on the cross to take away our sins. Lord, we are truly sorry for the sins we have committed and the sins we have committed by our inaction. Please send your saving Grace down on us today and give us rest. Amen.

Monday, March 2

By the Rev. Dr. Wayne Kannaday '75

Professor of Religion

 

“God blessed them, and God said to them, “Be fruitful and multiply, and fill the earth and subdue it; and have dominion over the fish of the sea and over the birds of the air and over every living thing that moves upon the earth….” — Genesis 1:28

 

God punctuated the creation of all the birds of the air and the creatures of the sea and the animals of the earth with a blessing — the first blessing noted in the scriptures — to “be fruitful and multiply, and fill (the earth)….” (1:22). God repeated that blessing upon the humans he made immediately after, but to it the Lord added, “…and subdue and have dominion….” (1:28).

 

Perhaps no text of the Bible has been more frequently misinterpreted or blatantly disobeyed. Too often, too many of us humans have read that verse of blessing as a license to declare open season to use, abuse, and exploit the earth, its resources, and our fellow planetary inhabitants. Yet that is not at all what “subdue and have dominion” means.

 

To understand this biblical concept requires us to hold in tension two distinct truths. One is that we humans are mortal beings numbered among the other mortal beings with whom we share this globe. Yes, as creatures we may be the dominant species, but we remain counted among and alongside all the rest of the Darwinian taxonomy. In short, we, too, are creatures called to live with and amongst all the others.

 

But the second point is also true: we are called (blessed, says Genesis) to “subdue and dominate.” But rather than mandating a sense of power and authority over creation, those terms in the Bible, as Walter Brueggemann reminds us, have to do with “securing the well-being of every other creature and bringing the promise of each to fulfillment.” The dominance issued here is akin to that of a shepherd tending the flock. A Christian can find no better illustration of this notion than in Jesus himself. The greatest among us is to be one who serves, he said (Mark 10:43-44). Thus, the “one who has dominion” is to serve on behalf of others—all others. We are so blessed, it seems, to take care of God’s creation. We are blessed to be a blessing!

 

So whatever differing positions we as people of faith may hold with regard to “climate change,” there is no disputing that the God reflected in these verses from Genesis holds us accountable for the care of all that the Lord has made. We are not called to subjugate our world, but to be subject to it. We have been blessed to be a blessing, and see to it that God’s creation becomes what God wills it to be.

 

Let us pray.

Creator God, marvelous are the works of your hands and all that you have made. We have heard your call to safeguard our planet and shepherd our fellow creatures. Empower us to do this work according to your will. In the name of all that is holy we pray. Amen.

Friday, February 28

By the Rev. Dr. Wayne Kannaday '75

Professor of Religion

 

"So God created humankind in his image, in the image of God he created them; male and female he created them…." — Genesis 1:27

 

During fellowship time at chapel each week, Professor John Lesaine frequently reminds us of the words of the psalmist that “we are fearfully and wonderfully made” (Psalm 139:14). Indeed we are! As Genesis boldly reports, humans are created “in the image of God.” After speaking into existence light, firmament, time and space, sun and moon, land and sea, flora and fauna, the Lord punctuated the created cosmos by imagining into being creatures bearing God’s own image. Oh, make no mistake: still creatures. But creatures bearing a striking family resemblance to the Marvelous Maker Godself.

 

Consider the implications of that declaration. It means that the whole lot of us homo sapiens are fashioned to fancy our maker. We were imagined into existence in the image of God. That means the very essence of who we are in heart and mind and soul mirrors in mortal form the essence and nature of divine love and will and spirit.

 

In that profession is much to ponder, but for today let us focus on this: that God’s image transcends the vagaries of ethnic categories or social taxonomies we might construct. All of humankind, we are told, carries traces of this divine imprint. Both male and female reflect the image of God. No race or class or economic status is singled out. Physical specimen is not distinguished from awkward weakling, nor the sage from the fool. Each of us and all of us bear the likeness of God.

 

Certainly, this gives us cause to celebrate, but it also has implications for our daily lives, for how we treat our neighbors, our co-workers, strangers on the street, and even refugees who seek sanctuary in our borders. Whether people look like us or speak our language or share our political ideologies or religious beliefs, our Lord would have us recall that each and every one is “fearfully and wonderfully made … in the image of God.”

 

So, how shall we treat God’s likeness today?

 

Let us pray.

Creator of us all, open our eyes to discern your image in the faces of all the persons we encounter each day, and open our hearts to treat each other with the sense that we are looking you in the eye. Amen.

Thursday, February 27

By the Rev. Dr. Wayne Kannaday '75

Professor of Religion

 

“The earth was a formless void and darkness covered the face of the deep, but the Spirit of God moved over the waters. And God said, 'Let there be light!' And there was….” — Genesis 1:2-3

 

The wonderful first verses of the Bible tell us of the time God first felt the impulse to be creative: to make something where nothing had been before, to transform a mass of amorphous matter into something that mattered, into something alive and amazing, something God called “good.”

 

Beginning with “Let there be light,” as the story goes, over the course of six days God spoke into existence everything from planets to plants, peanuts to pomegranates, and panthers to people. And all that just by saying the word! Whatever words passed from his lips came to pass. And it was so.  

 

There’s a lesson in that, people of God, something about the power of God’s word. Opening the Bible is like playing with dynamite, especially when one pores over those words with a dose of prayer or in the company of fellow believers. The word explodes in a reaction that transforms hope into promise, suffering into deliverance, void into capacity, chaos into creation, death into life.

 

Life has long since taught us that words matter, but here the scriptures remind us of the good news that God’s word materializes. God’s will comes to pass. It happens on earth as in heaven.  

 

On earth, indeed! This Lenten season bears witness to the time that holy word became flesh and dwelled among us, became mortal and, on a cross, experienced mortality. That same word that previously moved over the face of the deep willingly submitted to the depths of hell itself. No wonder the earth shook and the sun’s light failed.  

 

But, as Genesis reveals, darkness and chaos do not persist when the Spirit insists, “Let the earth bring forth living creatures….” And it was so! As God’s whispers turn chaos into creation, and God’s light shines in darkness such that the darkness cannot overcome it, so the Lord’s life overcomes any and all who would threaten to silence that death-defying, life-giving word.  

 

People of faith, this is good news for us who these days feel like we are living in a dark and murky chaos. For creation is not something God did long ago and finished and forgot about, but is something the Lord has been working on ever since. And so it is that the same divine Spirit continues to move over the face of the deep, and that voice speaks, “Let my will be done….” And so, in God’s good time, it shall be! Amen.   

 

Let us pray.

Creator God, Lord of all, we pause in this moment to listen for the echo of your continuing creation. Help us discern your voice and live in concert with your will, that we may be part of it being done on earth as it is in heaven. Amen.

Ash Wednesday, February 26

By the Rev. Herman R. Yoos

Bishop of the South Carolina Synod of the ELCA

 

“Even now, says the Lord, return to me with all your heart . . . rend your hearts and not your clothing. Return to the Lord your God, for he is gracious and merciful, slow to anger and abounding in steadfast love.” — Joel 2:12 

 

For over 1,000 years, many Christians have marked the beginning of Lent by receiving ashes on their forehead in the shape of a cross and by hearing the words spoken to each person, “Remember, you are dust and to dust you shall return.” One might well ask, wouldn’t it be preferable to hear the words, “God loves you,” instead? Is this just one more thing that the church is out of step with today? Or is there perhaps a deeper wisdom behind this tradition that can be both helpful and even hopeful?

 

Recently, columnist Oliver Beckman in an article called “Age of Rage” wrote: “Our society today is much better at giving us causes for anger than it is at helping know what to do with our anger.” Whether it is our politicians or news commentators, or our own mixed motives for blaming anyone besides ourselves for our frustrations, the result is the same. We live with a sense of impatience, distrust and anger towards anyone who thinks or acts differently than we do. 

 

So what does this have to do with ashes? In the Bible, ashes were most often worn by the Israelites to express sorrow or repentance. It was a way of saying to God, “I need your help, please forgive me. I have said and done hurtful things that I can’t undo or change without your help.” In this sense, ashes are a symbol of one’s humility and a desire for a closer relationship with God.

 

That is what the prophet Joel was getting at when he wrote, “Return to the Lord your God, for God is gracious and merciful, slow to anger and abounding in steadfast love.” To return to God is to admit how often we find ourselves wandering through our lives without a sense of God’s direction or purpose, weighed down and worried about things we cannot control. Here through the prophet Joel, God is saying, “You don’t have to feel lost and alone. You can return to me whenever you have lost your way because I am gracious, merciful and slow to anger.”

 

In other words, ashes on Ash Wednesday are a symbol of our inner need for God’s forgiveness and grace. They are a reminder that we are not in charge of the universe. It is a practice from the ancient church that prepares our hearts in an honest reflection of repentance in light of our mortality.

 

Prayer

Dear Lord,

Thanks that you never get tired of inviting us to return to you with all our hearts. Free us from a sense of separation from you and one another. Help us this Lenten season to let go of the angers and fears that so often divide humanity into competing tribes of self-interest. Forgive us and renew us each day by your presence and peace. Amen.                       

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Called to the Common Good

Called to the Common Good

High School Youth Theology Institute

July 5-12 2020

 

WHO AM I?

WHAT DO I BELIEVE?

CAN I REALLY MAKE A DIFFERENCE?

 

Do you ever ask yourself these questions and wonder how you can use your gifts to make an impact? Are you concerned about the problems facing our society but not sure how one person can make a difference? Do you want to focus on your Christian faith as a resource for making the world a better place?

 

If you are currently a high school student and answered “yes” to any of these questions, consider applying to Called to the Common Good: High School Youth Theology Institute. An online application can be found here.

 

WHO

High school students currently in 9th, 10th, 11th or 12th grade.

 

WHEN

July 5 - 12, 2020

 

WHERE

Newberry College in Newberry, South Carolina.  This is a residential institute; students will live away from home throughout the eight-day program, which includes a three-day off-site retreat.

 

WHAT

  • Engage in hands-on activities, spiritual inquiry and fellowship with other high school students
  • Thoughtfully reflect on your beliefs about God, self and community
  • Learn how to create positive change in the communities and causes that are important to you
  • Develop leadership skills
  • Enjoy a three-day off-site retreat where you will plan how to take what you have learned back to your home church and community
  • Learn from Newberry College professors and undergraduate students
  • Live in campus housing at Newberry College with undergraduate students trained to serve as academy counselors and peer mentors

 

COST

$300 enrollment fee. 

The one-time enrollment fee covers all meals, lodging (including a three-day off-site retreat), instruction, activities and materials. You are responsible for travel expenses to and from Newberry College. Check with your home church for possible assistance covering your enrollment fee and other costs. Limited scholarships are available. 

Apply for the Program

Candidates for the program can be nominated by a mentor or apply directly. Ask your faith leader, pastor, church youth minister/director, school principal, teacher or guidance counselor to submit a nomination or agree to be a mentor.

 

CLICK HERE TO SUBMIT AN APPLICATION

 

CLICK HERE TO SUBMIT A NOMINATION

 

Mentors are welcome to submit multiple nominations for candidates they believe would benefit from participating in Called to the Common Good: High School Youth Theology Institute. 

Why Should I Attend?

“You will not always be able to solve all of the world’s problems at once, but don’t ever underestimate the importance you can have, because history has shown us that courage can be contagious and hope can take on a life of its own.”

– Michelle Obama

 

The opportunity!

Called to the Common Good offers a unique introduction to the college experience and the chance for you to actively address critical social problems such as food insecurity, mass violence and environmental destruction. The program also promotes diversity, teamwork and leadership. You will gain pre-professional experience from completing the program along with a deeper understanding of faith and the role that religious study can play in defining life goals.

 

The value!

Residential summer programs similar to Called to the Common Good typically cost $3,500 per student. Thanks to a generous grant from Lilly Endowment, Inc., Newberry College is able to cover all but the $300 enrollment fee.

 

The Community!

Part of Called to the Common Good's magic is the unique community that emerges every summer. We intentionally welcome high school students from different cultural and denominational backgrounds, who come together to learn, worship, and grow with one another and in the process start seeing the world through many eyes.

Frequently Asked Questions

What is Called to the Common Good?

Called to the Common Good is an eight-day residential youth theology institute that brings together a cohort of high school students who will work together with Newberry College professors and undergraduates to learn about how the Christian theological tradition can be a resource for looking at moral and ethical challenges facing the world.

 

Who can participate?

Any student who is currently in grade 9,  10, 11 or 12 may apply or be nominated. Called to the Common Good will accept up to 24 candidates who demonstrate church and community involvement, thoughtful reflection on social issues, and interest in community service, religious study and leadership.

 

When and where is the institute?

The High School Youth Theology Institute will be held July 5 through July 12, 2020, on the Newberry College campus in Newberry, South Carolina. This is a residential program. Students will live away from home for the duration of the eight-day program in a Newberry College residence hall for the on-campus portion and in housing arranged by the Institute for the off-site retreat. 

 

How much will it cost to attend?

The enrollment fee is $300. This one-time fee covers five days of on-campus housing at Newberry College, a three-day off-site retreat, instruction, activities and materials, and all meals for the entire eight day program. Attendees are responsible for travel expenses to and from Newberry College. Home congregations of accepted candidates are encouraged to assist with the enrollment fee and other costs. Limited scholarships available.

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Lodgings

Lodging In and Around Newberry College

Hampton Inn, Newberry Opera House

1201 Nancy Street

Newberry, SC 29108

803.276.6666

View Website

 

Holiday Inn Express and Suites

2012 InterContinental Hotal Group Torchbearer Award Winner

1-26/Exit 76 (Main Street/SC Highway 219)

121 Truman Avenue

Newberry, SC 29108

803.321.3955

View Website

 

Econo Lodge

1147 Wilson Road

Newberry, SC 29108

803.276.1600

View Website

 

Days Inn

I-26 & Highway 34 - Winnsboro Rd (Exit 74)

Newberry, SC 29108

803.276.2294

View Website

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Division C

2018 SOUTH CAROLINA SCIENCE OLYMPIAD Division C

Saturday, March 17 at Newberry College

 

  • Informative brochures outlining our state program were emailed to all South Carolina High Schools the week of August 21. If you did not receive one and would like to request that one be mailed to you, click here and provide your mailing address.
  • Membership Forms and fees due by December 31, 2017. For a printable on-line version click here.
  • Coaches Manuals/Event Rules will be sent to schools as soon as registration fees have been received.
  • The 2017 state events are listed below. Please note that every event held at the national competition and listed in the 2017 Coaches Manual will not be offered on the state level.
  • For general descriptions of these events and for coaching tips and resources, visit the National Science Olympiad Event Information Page.
  • Be sure to check the Rules Clarifications Page periodically for changes/updates to the rules.

 

2018 STATE SCIENCE OLYMPIAD EVENT LIST - DIVISION C (FINAL LIST)
Anatomy & Physiology Helicopters
Astronomy Herpetology
Chemistry Lab Misson Possible
Disease Detectives Mousetrap Vehicle
Dynamic Planet Optics
Ecology Remote Sensing
Experimental Design Rocks and Minerals
Fast Facts Thermodynamics
Fermi Questions Towers
Forensics Write It, Do It

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Division B

2018 SOUTH CAROLINA SCIENCE OLYMPIAD Division B

Saturday, February 17 at Newberry College

  • Informative brochures outlining our state program were emailed to all South Carolina Middle Schools the week of August 21. If you did not receive one and would like to request that one be mailed to you, click here and provide your mailing address.
  • Membership Forms and fees due by December 31, 2017. For a printable on-line version click here.
  • Coaches Manuals/Event Rules will be sent to schools as soon as registration fees have been received.
  • The 2017 state events are listed below. Please note that every event held at the national competition and listed in the 2017 Coaches Manual will not be offered on the state level. 
  • For general descriptions of these events and for coaching tips and resources, visit the National Science Olympiad Event Information Page.
  • Be sure to check the Rules Clarifications Page periodically for changes/updates to the rules.

 

2018 STATE SCIENCE OLYMPIAD EVENT LIST - DIVISION B (FINAL LIST)
Anatomy & Physiology Mystery Architecture
Battery Buggy Optics
Crime Busters Portions and Poisons
Disease Detectives Road Scholar
Dynamic Planet Rocks and Minerals
Ecology Rollar Coaster      
Experimental Design Solar System
Fast Facts Towers
Herpetology Wright Stuff
Meteorology Write It, Do It

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Security Thank You

Thank You!

We've received your anonymous submission and will investigate shortly.

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Summer Courses

All online. All fees waived.

Get ahead for fall, or simply get ahead, with a summer class at Newberry College!

Summer term is usually a time for students to...

  • Get ahead on hours, especially core curriculum requirements
  • Improve GPA to meet scholarship and eligibility requirements heading into the fall
  • Retake or make up courses for a better grade
  • Renew credentials for teachers or other professionals

 

Due to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, all summer courses will be held online, fees have been waived, and new courses have been added, so there has never been a better time to enroll for summer.

 

Summer I classes begin Monday, June 1. Registration ends Tuesday, June 2.

 

Quick links for more information

Summer I Course List (June 1-24)

Summer Session Application (PDF)

Summer Session Bulletin

Summer II Course List (July 1-24)

Financial Aid

Tuition per semester hour $300
Common fee per term (waived) — $120
Lab fee per course (waived) — $95

 

Quick facts

  • Pell Grants may pay for part or all of course tuition for eligible students
  • Incoming students who want to get ahead on hours and get a feel for college-level coursework can register after contacting their admission counselor to switch their official start date to summer, and after completing a 2019-2020 FAFSA

  • Limited financial aid may be available for current students

 

Questions? Email finaid@newberry.edu or call 803.321.5127.

Enroll Now

Current Students

Register in your Wolf Den student portal.

 

Non-Degree-Seeking Students

Complete the summer session application. If you have any questions, please email admission@newberry.edu.

 

Incoming Students

Contact your admission counselor to switch your official start date to summer, and complete a 2019-2020 FAFSA.

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Newberry College Alumni Award of Valor

Newberry College Alumni Award of Valor

This award is to recognize courageous action or note worthy bravery by a person who is an alumnus/a of Newberry College. Potential recipients of the Award of Valor, when confronted with situations involving personal danger, acted with valor to avert or minimize potential disaster.

Award Recipients

2014 - Louis Mark Mulkey ('95)

2015 - Clyde Yonce ('39)

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Alumni Distinguished Service Award

Alumni Distinguished Service Award

The criteria for the Alumni Distinguished Service Award states that the award must be given to a Newberry alumnus/a who has made significant contributions to the ideals set forth in a liberal arts education. Distinctive service may have been rendered on national, state, and/or local levels. Nominees from each of the academic departments may be considered for the award. The recipient must exemplify creative and continuous personal growth and a willingness to embrace our changing world. This award also recognizes outstanding achievement and service to the recipient’s profession, community, society, and/or college.

Award Recipients

2014 - Wendell Davis ('81)

2015 - Dr. Julian Landrum Mims III ('64)

2016 - CSM Robert H. Brickley ('78)

2017 - Stephen M. Creech ('72)

2018 - Reggie Wicker ('04)

2019 - David Jenkins ('74)

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Noah and Pansy Derrick Outstanding Friend of the College Award

Noah and Pansy Derrick Outstanding Friend of the College Award

Presented to a non-alumnus/a who best exemplifies commitment to and support of Newberry College. Additional consideration is given for service to church, community, state, and nation.

Award Recipients

1968 - Deems Haltiwanger             

1969 - A. Hart Kohn          

1970 - Pansy Smoak Derrick          

1971 - Joseph Wessinger               

1972 - Erwin A. Baumer  

1973 - Richard Haymaker               

1974 - Virgil Sease           

1975 - Fred Wessels, Jr.  

1976 - William Boyd       

1977 - Vincent Vierling    

1978 - Milton Moore         

1980 - Raymond S. Caughman     

1981 - Edward O. Cannon              

1982 - Evelyn Stockman Segelken               

1983 - Harold B. Folk       

1984 - L. Grady Cooper   

1987 - James F. Coggins                

1988 - Fredrick William Kinard, Sr.                

1989 - James B. Wessinger            

1990 - Virginia B. Casey  

1991 - Hattie Belle Lester                

1993 - Ellen Wingard Cobb            

1994 - Sadie Crooks        

1997 - Bobby & Georgette Livingston           

1998 - Ruth Bundrik Jenkins           

1999 - J. Thomas Johnson             

2000 - Richard & DeLouris Hollinger            

2001 - Billy West               

2002 - Mary Ellen Carter | Glenn E. Whitesides            

2003 - Jerry S. Chitty | Francis I. Fesperman           

2004 - James Gerding     

2005 - Carol Bickley         

2006 - Gordon Henry | Susan McArver | Peter McCandless | Ronald Numbers | Lester Stephens

2008 - Julie Epting | Walt McLeod

2009 - Gloria Nelson | Irvin & Connie Pund

2010 - T. Edward Kyzer   

2011 - Jeff Shocker | Misty West

2012 - Denise Reid

2013 - Carol Brandt | Frank P. Tourville, Sr.

2014 - David and Ruth Vorpagel

2015 - Foster Senn

2016 - Joel M.Carter

2017 - Raymond L. and Julie E. Hendrix

2018 - Charlie T. Arnsdorff

2019 - Lee Foster

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Phillip T. Kelly, Jr. Outstanding Young Alumnus/a Award

Phillip T. Kelly, Jr. Outstanding Young Alumni Award

Presented to an alumnus/a aged of forty (40) or younger who best exemplifies commitment to and support of Newberry College. Additional consideration is given for service to church, community, state, and nation.

Award Recipients

1978 - Donald Dowling ('67) 

1979 - W. Alvin Gainey ('73)

1980 - William R. Sommerville ('75)

1981 - Harvey Leroy Atwater ('73)

1982 - Richard Webber ('69)

1983 - James H. Riddle, Jr. ('72)

1984 - Laura Neath Vinson ('71)

1985 - Philip T. Kelly,lll ('69)

1986 - Delores Snelgrove Camp ('78)

1987 - R.E. Lybrand, Jr. ('71)

1988 - Robert Donald Alcorn ('71)

1989 - David Caldwell Reames ('75)

1990 - Rhonda Taylor Norris ('80)

1991 - Marilyn Boone Kimbrell ('78)

1992 - Gerald P. Dickinson, Jr. ('86)

1993 - Deryl D. Leaphart ('80)

1994 - Susan Wingard Clifton ('82)

1995 - Jeanette McKinney Davis ('88)

1996 - Kelly Ahrens ('90)

1997 - Dorothy Park Jehlen ('82)

1998 - John A. Babson ('87)

1999 - Joe B. "Trey" Castles, III ('94)

2000 - Shannon O'Brien ('98)

2001 - Mark Pleasant ('89) 

2002 - Donna Freeman Calcutt ('86) | Steven M. Calcutt ('84)

2003 - Brent A. Weaver ('92)

2004 - John Miller ('94)

2005 - Peggy Barnes Winder ('86) | Huger P. Caughman ('00)

2006 - Heath Brabham ('95)

2008 - Wyatt Chocklett ('07)

2009 - Kristin Caughman ('04)

2010 - Kelly Furtick ('00)

2011 - Zeb Reid ('02)

2012 - Melanie Metze Corn ('07) | Michael K. Corn ('08)

2013 - Joshua T. Stepp ('07)

2014 - April Troglauer ('07)

2015 - Brian Shealy ('04)

2016 - Parkes B. Coggins ('05)

2017 - Brandon Gantt ('08)

2018 - Rev. Kevin L. Strickland ('04)

2019 - Charlie Banks ('05)

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Thomas A. Epting Outstanding Alumnus/a Award

Thomas A. Epting Outstanding Alumni Award

Presented to an alumnus/a over the age of forty (40) who best exemplifies commitment to and support of Newberry College. Additional consideration is given for service to church, community, state, and nation.

Award Recipients

1968 - Dr. J.A. Shelay ('13)

1969 - Dr. James C. Kinard ('16)

1970 - Dr. Karl W. Kinard ('22)

1971 - Philip T. Kelly, Jr. ('33)

1972 - Dr. Hubert Stezler ('26) |  Sadie Wagers Edwards ('24)

1973 - Dr. John Clarson ('23) | Esther Sherouse Preuett ('29)

1974 - Dr. Homer Eargle ('25) | Harry L. Eleazer ('28)

1975 - Clara Shealy Hawkins ('38)

1976 - The Rev. Henry S. Petrea ('12)

1977 - The Rev. J. Virgil Addy ('31)

1978 - Elizabeth Rice Boone ('45)

1979 - Rev. Fred E. Dufford ('25) | Thomas Stilwell ('26)

1980 - Vernon Eptings ('36) 

1981 - Elizabeth Shealy Hunter ('44)

1982 - Clifford B. Morgan ('37) 

1983 - Lawrence Benjamin Graves ('46)

1984 - Francis Addy Snelgrove ('45) | Dr. Herman L. Frick ('29)

1985 - Dr. James L. Graham Jr. ('60) | Prema Lever Gnann ('33)

1986 - The Rev. Henry McCullough, Jr. ('29) 

1987 - Louise Eargle Seastrunk ('27) 

1988 - Mary Ellen Rawl Wingard ('53) 

1989 - Dr. David J. Haigler ('44) 

1990 - Robert Eargle Seastrunk ('55) 

1991 - Thomas A. "Bucko" Edens ('47) 

1992 - Rev. Charles J. Shealy, Jr. ('40)

1993 - Margaret Paysinger ('38) 

1994 - Harry Weber ('42)

1995 - Murray L. Davis ('53) | James Aull ('53)

1996 - Gaines Orin Boone ('48) 

1997 - Fred Voight Lester ('42)

1998 - Dorothy P. Brandt ('54)

1999 - J. Asbury Bedenbaugh ('38)

2000 - Doris Dominick Sandberg ('52) | John L. Sease ('70)

2001 - E. Eugene Epting Jr. ('69) 

2002 - James W. Ingram Jr. ('69)

2003 - Christie C. Whitaker ('84)

2004 - Virginia K. Aull ('55) | Clarence Stucke ('43)

2005 - William Bethea ('62) | Patrick Dennis ('54) | Hap Corley ('47) 

2006 - Bill Hilton Jr. ('70) | John Hudgens ('60)

2008 - Julie McLeod ('59) - John Yost Jr. ('43) | David Epting ('44) | Daniel Koon ('81)

2009 - Nelson Rickenbaker ('84) | Virgil Kester ('41) | Frances Kester ('41) | Edward "Buddy" Counts Jr. ('63)

2010 - The Dufford Family

2011 - Phillip M. Spotts ('56) | Mary Kathryn "Kathy" Whitaker Spotts ('63) | George W. Dominick ('65)

2012 - Robert “Bob” Hampton ('61)

2013 - William P. Walker, Jr. ('69)

2014 - Dorothy "Dot" Jeffcoat ('63)

2015 - Dick Roberts ('65) | Joanne Jumper ('62)

2016 - Otho L. Shealy ('48)

2017 - L. Wayne Pearson ('70)

2018 - Pastor Mary W. Anderson ('78)

2019 - Dr. Margaret "Peggy" Yonce Ward  ('64)

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Dual-Degree at Duke University

Forestry at Duke University

3 + 2 Program with Duke University

The Newberry College 3 + 2 Program is an outstanding cooperation with Duke University that leads to a master’s degree in Forestry and Environmental Management. We lay the strong foundation at Newberry that students build upon at Duke, allowing students to experience the best of both worlds academically. When all requirements are met for both institutions, students earn a bachelor of science degree in Biology from Newberry College and a Master of Forestry or Master of Environmental Management from Duke University. For more information

 

NEWBERRY COLLEGE

3 years

+

DUKE UNIVERSITY

2 years

Student completes:

· minimum of 90 semester hours for B.S. in Biology

· general education and related graduation requirements for Newberry College

· recommended courses for dual degree with Duke

 

Student completes:

· Remaining classes for Newberry Biology degree

· 48 semester hours of graduate level studies

Student must earn a minimum grade of 2.7/4.0 and receive a B-minus or better in order for these classes to count toward the master’s degree prerequisite. Formal application for admission also must be made to the Duke University School of the Environment.

For more information about degree programs at Newberry College, contact 803.321.5127 or admission@newberry.edu.  

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Dual-Degree at Lenoir Rhyne

Professional Master of Science in Athletic Training Education

The Master of Science in AthleticTraining program is designed as an entry-level degree for people entering the field of athletic training. The degree is designed to prepare individuals for positions as athletic trainers in a variety of employment settings. The program uses an integrative curriculum for the development of strong clinical and decision-making skills. 

.

Available at LRU’s Columbia and Hickory campuses. Students are required to complete their initial didactic training in Hickory, but then offers fieldwork placement in or near Columbia. The program is accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education (CAATE).

 

The Master of Science in Athletic Training program seeks to provide a program to develop students who are:

  • Prepared for service to God and mankind through the healing art and science of Athletic Training
  • Critical thinkers who are caring, skilled athletic trainers
  • Leaders in the profession of athletic training, the community, and the world

Students complete clinical education courses with required field experiences over a two-year period.The first year includes four rotations at various clinical sites helping the student begin to implement knowledge and skill from the classroom.  During the second year, there  are two assigned rotations. For more information 

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Dual-Degree at Lenoir Rhyne University

Master of Arts in Human Services

The Human Services Program is designed to give you the knowledge and skills required to make a difference in the overall quality of life for individuals and communities.  In our online program, students learn how to meet human needs, not only through direct services, but by providing leadership in human service agencies, organizations, and communities

 

Program Highlights

  • 33 credit hours – most students can complete the program in 18 to 24 months.
  • The program is completely online, so you can enroll from anywhere in the world. However, the online experience does not mean you have to sacrifice engagement with faculty and fellow students.
  • Our program is designed to provide you with opportunities to interact with students from around the country as well as the world and our faculty make it a priority to be available to students.
  • Internship experiences will provide you with hands-on opportunities for students to engage in the field with human service professionals.

The Master of Arts in Human Services is designed to prepare graduates as human service professionals to manage care for vulnerable client populations, manage public or nonprofit organizations and administer programs and services. Students can specialize in Administration, Addictions Counseling or Career Counseling. The program is available entirely online. For more information 

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Dual Degree at Lenoir Rhyne University

Master of Arts in Clinical Mental Health Counseling

The Master of Arts in Clinical Mental Health Counseling at Lenoir Rhyne University is designed to prepare graduates for positions as professional counselors, the program meets coursework requirements toward professional licensure. Courses are available evenings and weekends or online to cater to working professionals.

 

For the convenience of students, courses for the counseling program are available at all three campuses of LRU in Hickory, Asheville, and Columbia, S.C. The programs in Hickory and Asheville are accredited by the Council of Accreditation for Counseling & Related Educational Programs (CACREP). Accreditation in Columbia is pending.

 

Program Highlights

  • Clinical Mental Health Counseling has 61 required credits and School Counseling has 52 required credits.
  • The Clinical Mental Health Counseling program is available in Hickory, Asheville, and Columbia.
  • The School Counseling degree is available in Hickory and Asheville.
  • All faculty members are Licensed Professional Counselors who emphasize a mentor relationship with their students.
  • Designed for the working professional in mind with online, evening, hybrid, and week-end course offerings.
  • Traditional and Career Admission Tracks give students more than one way to be admitted.

 

For more information: Clinical Mental Health Counseling-Lenior Rhyne University

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Dual Degree Programs

Dual Degree Programs

A dual degree program is based on a formal agreement within one college/university or between separate colleges/universities. Students spend 2–3 years in each degree program. After completing all requirements for both programs (usually in 4-5 years) the student is awarded two degrees in one of the following combinations:

  • Associate and bachelor' degrees (an associate degree from a community college and a bachelor's degree from a partner university).
  • Dual bachelor degrees (one awarded from each of the partner institutions).
  • Bachelor and masters degree (a bachelor's degree award from one institution and a master's degree awarded by a second institution).
  • Dual graduate degrees (a combination of DDS, DO, MA, MD, MPP, MS, JD, MBA, MPH or PhD).

Dual-Degree Programs

Newberry College has dual degree agreements with several institutions for the following bachelor's and master's programs: 

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Accepted Students Experience

Friday, April 5, 2019

Students are invited to join us on Friday, April 5, starting at 1p.m. to meet current students and fellow members of the Class of 2023. Get the inside track on preparing to join the Wolf Pack, enjoy dinner and participate in fun events with your future classmates. 

For Families

For families whose travel time may require an overnight stay in Newberry, the City of Newberry offers a variety of options for local accommodations

Click for more information about the City of Newberry.

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Pioneers

African-American Pioneers at Newberry College

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Institutional Review Board

Institutional Review Board

Any outside organization wishing to do research within the Newberry College campus should contact the Executive Director for Institutional Effectiveness, Sid Parrish, at sid.parrish@newberry.edu

Studies completed on campus are subject to the supervision of the Newberry College Institutional Review Board. Once your request has been submitted, you will be provided additional information on the steps required to complete your project on campus. 

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Submission Thank You

Thank You!

Thank you for your submission!

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Homecoming

Homecoming 2020

Hail Scarlet and the Gray

October 16 - 18, 2020

Information coming soon. Please check back later.

Questions?

For questions about homecoming festivities, please contact the Office of Alumni Relations

alumni.relations@newberry.edu

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Family Weekend 2020

Family Weekend 2020

Information coming soon. Please check back later.

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3 + 2 Program

Newberry, Clemson Sign Dual Education Agreement


Newberry College has launched a dual education program with Clemson University. The Newberry College 3 + 2 Program will allow students to earn bachelor of science degrees from both Newberry College and Clemson University in five years. A similar program with Duke University leads from a bachelor’s degree to a master’s degree in five years.
A key feature of the 3 + 2 Program with Clemson University is that it provides a clear pathway for students wishing to pursue a career in engineering. The program offers guaranteed admission into most of Clemson’s engineering programs for students who successfully complete all academic requirements of the 3 + 2 Program. 
“The Newberry College 3 + 2 Program is ideal for students who may be more comfortable starting out at a smaller campus like ours,” said Timothy Elston, vice president for Academic Affairs. “Newberry’s highly interactive and hands-on classroom setting builds a strong academic foundation that will help students thrive in Clemson’s rigorous engineering program.”
 

How It Works


Students participating in the 3 + 2 Program complete their first three years of study at Newberry College where they fulfill all general education and other graduation requirements for Newberry. Students complete the remaining two years of study at Clemson University, where they complete the course requirements for an Engineering degree. 
Students work with an academic advisor from each institution to develop a personalized course of study for their desired path in Clemson’s engineering program. When all requirements are met for both institutions, students earn a bachelor of science degree in Mathematics from Newberry College and a bachelor of science degree in Engineering from Clemson University.
 

 

NEWBERRY COLLEGE

3 years

+

CLEMSON UNIVERSITY

2 years

Student completes:

· minimum of 90 semester hours for B.S. in Mathematics

· recommended courses for dual degree with Clemson

· introductory Engineering course with Clemson in distance education format

· general education and related graduation requirements for Newberry College

 

Student completes:

· Course requirements for Clemson Engineering degree

· 32 semester hours of Engineering coursework at Clemson, which also fulfills fourth-year requirements for a Mathematics degree from Newberry

Students must apply to the 3+2 Program by sophomore year, maintain a cumulative GPA of 2.7/4.0 and receive a “C” or better in all of the required courses in the 3+2 program to be eligible for admission to the engineering program.

 
“The Newberry College 3 + 2 program is an excellent example of how our institutions can work together for the mutual benefit of our students,” Elston said. 
 
3 + 2 Program with Duke University
Newberry College offers a similar 3 + 2 program in cooperation with Duke University that leads to a master’s degree in Forestry and Environmental Management. When all requirements are met for both institutions, students earn a bachelor of science degree in Biology from Newberry College and a Master of Forestry or Master of Environmental Management from Duke University.
 

 

NEWBERRY COLLEGE

3 years

+

DUKE UNIVERSITY

2 years

Student completes:

· minimum of 90 semester hours for B.S. in Biology

· general education and related graduation requirements for Newberry College

· recommended courses for dual degree with Duke

 

Student completes:

· Remaining classes for Newberry Biology degree

· 48 semester hours of graduate level studies

Student must earn a minimum grade of 2.7/4.0 and receive a B-minus or better in order for these classes to count toward the master’s degree prerequisite. Formal application for admission also must be made to the Duke University School of the Environment.

 


“The Newberry College 3 + 2 Program is an outstanding partnership between our institutions that allows our students to experience the best of both worlds academically,” said Newberry College president Dr. Maurice Scherrens. “We lay the strong foundation on which they’ll build at the research institutions where they will complete their program.”
For more information about degree programs at Newberry College, go to www.newberry.edu or 803.321.5127 or admission@newberry.edu.  

 

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Map & Directions

Newberry College

2100 College St, Newberry, SC 29108
(803) 276-5010

 

Click here for directions to Newberry College.

 

 

 

Download a printable copy of Newberry College's campus map here.

 

Directions to Newberry College from Neary-by Locations

Traveling West on Interstate-26 (From Columbia)

Exit the Interstate at exit #76 (The sign says “Newberry Opera House, Newberry College") and turn left onto SC Highway 219. Go 3.2 miles, passing the high school (on the right) and Wal-Mart (on the left). Cross US-76 at the third traffic light (SC-219 turns into SC-34, Main Street ). Go 1.4 miles down Main Street, passing through three more traffic lights. Turn right (north) on College Street, passing through two traffic lights. Turn right on Evans street and then turn left on Luther street. Turn right on Bachman street. You may park in the back of the building.

 

Traveling East on Interstate-26 (From Greenville/Spartanburg)

Exit the Interstate at exit #76 (The sign says “Newberry Opera House, Newberry College") and turn right onto SC Highway 219. Go 3.2 miles, passing the high school (on the right) and Wal-Mart (on the left). Cross US-76 at the third traffic light (SC-219 turns into SC-34, Main Street ). Go 1.4 miles down Main Street, passing through three more traffic lights. Turn right (north) on College Street, passing through two traffic lights. Turn right on Evans street and then turn left on Luther street. Turn right on Bachman street. You may park in the back of the building.  

 

Traveling East from Greenwood, SC

Take Highway 34 East from Greenwood . Proceed through Ninety Six, Chappels, and Silverstreet. In Silverstreet, Highway 34 will merge with Highway 121. Continue on Highway 34/121 for approximately 4.5 miles until the two highways split. Go left on Boundary Street for 2 miles. Take a left onto College Street, passing through two traffic lights. Turn right on Evans street and then turn left on Luther street. Turn right on Bachman street. You may park in the back of the building.  

 

Traveling West from Prosperity, SC

Take Highway 76 West from Prosperity for 7 miles through 1 traffic light. You will pass Wal-mart on the right. Take a left onto Main Street at the 2nd traffic light. Go 1.2 miles down Main Street, passing through three more traffic lights. Turn right (north) on College Street, passing through two traffic lights. Turn right on Evans street and then turn left on Luther street. Turn right on Bachman street. You may park in the back of the building.

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Wessels Library

Wessels Library

Wessels Library offers a great location to study, work with friends, conduct research or browse newspapers, magazines and recently published books. With decades of combined experience in assisting guests who need information and academic support, our friendly and knowledgeable staff is always ready to help students get better research results and locate the numerous resources the library provides. With both collaborative and quiet study areas, the library serves the study and research needs of Newberry College students. Computers and print/copy/scan machines are available for student use.
 
Visit Library

 

The library’s print collection of reference materials and circulating books encompasses 35,000 volumes. Additionally, Wessels Library provides online access to hundreds of thousands of electronic resources (including e-books and full-text journal and periodical articles), which are available 24/7 to the entire campus community. Participation in the Partnership Among South Carolina Academic Libraries (PASCAL) allows the library’s users access to more than a million books.

 

Tutoring

Wessels Library and Center for Student Success arrange peer tutoring on a variety of subjects that is free to all students of Newberry College. Tutoring schedules and subject areas covered may vary by semester depending on the availability of tutors. The current tutoring schedule can be viewed on Wolf Den, on the Wessels Library website or in-person at the Library front desk. 

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EQUIPMENT BUYING GUIDE

Suggested Equipment for Communications Students

Prices are approximate and not guaranteed. Lower prices may possibly be found through online retailers such as Amazon.com. Regardless, please check carefully to make sure the items you select will meet the requirements outlined below. The Communications program is not responsible for equipment that does not meet recommended standards. Please contact Dr. Jodie Peeler or Prof. Al de Lachica if you need guidance.

 

STANDARD EQUIPMENT

Digital Camcorder ($300-$400)
This will be used in all video production courses, as well as journalism courses. The Communications program uses and recommends the Canon Vixia HF R40 HD camcorder (approx. $350). The camcorder you select must have similar capabilities, in particular HD capabilities and the ability to produce output in MP4 format.

Tripod ($15-$25)
The Communications program uses and recommends the Magnus PV-3400 tripod (approx. $15.00). The tripod you select must not only be compatible with your chosen camcorder but must have telescoping legs that help provide adequate height (the PV-3400 has a maximum height of 44”) as well as tilt and pan capabilities.

Carrying Bag for Camcorder and Equipment ($15-$25)
You will need at least one lavalier microphone that will connect to your camcorder
You will use this in interviews and on-camera assignments. The Polsen OLM-10 (approx. $23) is recommended.

Laptop Computer with Video Editing Software (varies)
Users of Apple-branded laptops already have iMovie as part of Mac OS X. Users of Windows systems should purchase the latest version of Pinnacle Studio Ultimate (approx. $90). Either way, you will need a laptop with reasonable computing power. Tablets (iPads, etc.) and similar devices will not work for what you’ll be doing in our courses.

Sound Editing Software (free)
Audacity is a powerful open-source sound editing suite available for free download for both Windows and Mac OS at http://audacity.sourceforge.net/

Appropriate Cables to Connect Your Camcorder to Your Computer (as needed)

 

 

STRONGLY RECOMMENDED

Portable Digital Sound Recorder (approx. $150-$200)
This will let you record high-fidelity audio projects in digital format for audio production courses and broadcast journalism projects. Choose a high quality unit that will allow you to use memory cards and external microphones through an XLR or mini-jack (3.5 mm) input and that will connect to your laptop via USB connection. The Tascam DR-05 (approx. $175) is a good choice, especially if you can purchase it as part of a “value pack.”

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FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

I planned to attend the April 17, 2020 Wolf Pack Welcome on campus?

Because access to campus is limited amid the spread of COVID-19, Student Affairs is working to help welcome the next class of Newberry Wolves. Contact Michael E. Smith or call 803.321.5501 on our virtual Wolf Pack Welcome. 

I have been admitted and will be attending Newberry College. When do I go to Wolf Pack Welcome?

As an admitted student, you will receive a letter from the Office of Enrollment Management about Wolf Pack Welcome. You can also find orientation information through Wolf Den. For questions, please contact the Office of First Year Experience at FYE@newberry.edu or 803-321-3311.

Is there a fee to attend Wolf Pack Welcome?

You and up to two guest can attend Wolf Pack Welcome at no additional cost. 

How do I sign up for Wolf Pack Welcome?

After you have paid the enrollment fee, you will have access to select your preferred session date through Wolf Den.

When will I have an opportunity to meet with an academic advisor?

You will be scheduled for a face-to-face appointment with an academic advisor during Wolf Pack Welcome.

Who can I contact with questions about Wolf Pack Welcome?

Contact the Office of First Year Experience at FYE@newberry.edu or 803.321.3311.

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Wolf Pack Welcome

Your Student Journey Begins

Welcome to the Wolf Pack! We look forward to being with you as you take the next steps on your educational journey. To help you make a smooth transition to the Newberry College family, all new students are required to attend Wolf Pack Welcome (new student orientation). Wolf Pack Welcome will help you get your college years off to a great start!

Wolf Pack Welcome

Wolf Pack Welcome is a one-day event designed for freshmen and transfer students and their families to give you your first glimpse of life at Newberry College. You'll learn about campus facilities and resources, finalize your academic schedule and meet with your advisor. It's also an opportunity to connect with new classmates and get acquainted with faculty, staff and coaches. If you have any questions, please contact the Office of First Year Programs at FYE@newberry.edu or 803.321.5501. 

 

2020 Dates

Friday, June 12 

Friday, July 10

Friday, July 24  

Thursday, August 13

 

Frequently Asked Questions

Registration for Wolf Pack Welcome

Once you have been admitted to Newberry College and have paid your enrollment fee, you will have access to the "Enrollment Fee Paid" tab in Wolf Den, where you will be able to select your preferred Wolf Pack Welcome date. The earlier you attend Wolf Pack Welcome, the sooner you can take care of the details necessary to enroll. You will also meet other new and current students, so attending an earlier date will give you the opportunity to start developing those relationships that much sooner.

Family Wolf Pack Welcome

A family orientation program runs concurrently with the Wolf Pack Welcome program for students. Families are encouraged to attend Wolf Pack Welcome to acquaint themselves with Newberry College. Family Orientation is free for two guests/family members of a freshman student. Additional guests are $10 per person (children 5 and under are free). Payment will be accepted on the day of orientation in the form of cash or check (made payable to Newberry College). 

Family Orientation sessions include: 
• Helping your student through the first year of college 
• Applying for financial aid and paying tuition and fees 
• Understanding academic policies, graduation requirements and support services
• Learning about life on campus, health services, safety and student success programs

 

Family members and students will be together for some sessions, while seperate for others, During a joint lunch faculty/staff representatives will be present so families and students can accquaint themselves with various individuals from different departments.

Alpha Leaders

Wolf Pack Welcome would not be possible without our student Alpha Leaders! Alpha Leaders are a team of specially trained students who are ready to help you get started at Newberry College. They are involved on campus in student organizations, Greek Life, athletics and student government association. Alpha Leaders participate in every Wolf Pack Welcome summer session and Howl Effect. Students and parents will be assisted by one or more Alpha Leader who is there to help guide you through the day and to answer any questions that may arise during the sessions.

Contact the Office of Student Affairs

Wolf Pack Welcome
Office of First Year Programs, FYE@newberry.edu or 803.321.5501.

 

Center for Student Success
Students requesting accommodations for disabilities should contact the Center for Student Success for assistance.

Barbara Joyner, Center for Student Success, Barbara.Joyner@newberry.edu or 803.321.5625. 

Parent/Guest Accommodations

Hampton Inn
1201 Nance Street
Newberry, SC 29108
803-276-6666

Holiday Inn Express
121 Truman Avenue
Newberry, SC 29108
803-321-3955
 

Newberry Manor Bed & Breakfast
1710 College Street
Newberry, SC  29108
803-597-5031

After Wolf Pack Welcome

Once you have attended Wolf Pack Welcome and have begun your journey as a Newberry Wolf, be sure to regularly check your Newberry College email as well as your Wolf Den account to stay connected to the campus community and keep in touch with your new friends, your Alpha Leader and academic advisor. 

Howl Effect

Howl Effect is Newberry College's welcome retreat for all first-year students August 16 - 19, 2019. Although mandatory for all first-year students, it is optional for transfer students (though we encourage both to attend!) Sorry parents; Howl Effect is just for students!

 

Howl Effect features a variety of activities to help get off to a great start at Newberry College. You'll go through academic check-in, meet your College Life 113 instructor, explore opportunities to get involved on campus at the Student Organization Fair, and attend info sessions to learn about campus resources. You'll also pose for the Class of 2021 photo, prepare for our annual lip sync battle and much more. We'll conclude with the Candle Lighting Ceremony, an annual tradition to officially welcome first-year students to the Newberry College family. 

 

Questions about Howl Effect?

Please contact the Office of  First-Year Experience at FYE@newberry.edu or 803.321.5501. 

 

 

Week of Welcome
Week of Welcome is your opportunity to join upperclassmen in welcome activities sponsored by the Office of Student Affairs. This week's events change with each year, so be sure you keep checking your email to see what kind of fun you can have upon your arrival!

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Pre-Engineering

The mission of the Pre-Engineering major at Newberry College is to provide students with a solid foundation in mathematics necessary to pursue an engineering degree at Clemson University.  

 

The dual-degree is a "3+2" program.  Students spend three years at Newberry College where they will take a minimum of 90 credit hours, including core courses under the guidance of their Mathematics faculty advisor and a Clemson advisor. They will then transfer to Clemson University for two years to finish course requirements for an engineering degree. 

 

Upon successful completion of the program, a student will graduate with an Applied Mathematics degree from Newberry College and an Engineering degree from Clemson University.

 

For more information about this dual degree, please visit: 

http://www.clemson.edu/ces/prospective-students/undergraduate/trans_dual.html

 

The “Three-Year Plan”

 

    FALL     SPRING  
Freshman Description Course Credits Description Course Credits
  Calculus I MAT 211 4 Calculus II MAT212 4
  Comp. Science CSC155 3 Discrete Math. MAT227 3
  Gen. Chemistry CHE113 4 Public Speaking SPE110 3
  Inquiry Course INQ101 3 Freshman Composition ENG113 3
  Intro. Engineering TBD w/ Advisor 3 Intro. Engineering TBD w/ Advisor 3
             
Sophomore Description Course Credits Description Course Credits
  Calculus III MAT213 4 Diff. Eqns. MAT261 3
  Survey of H.M. MAT225 3 Linear Algebra MAT334 3
  Physics I PHY213 4 Physics II PHY214 4
  HFA Electives TBD w/ Advisor 3 Freshman Composition ENG113 3
  REL Electives TBD w/ Advisor 3 GL Electives TBD w/ Advisor 3
             
Junior Description Course Credits Description Course Credits
  Abstract Algebra MAT443 4 Real Analysis MAT443

3

  Core & Electives TBD w/ Advisor ??? Core & Electives TBD w/ Advisor ???

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ENSEMBLES

Ensemble Groups

The Newberry College Department of Music proudly offers a variety of instrumental and vocal ensembles. For more information about how to get involved, contact the Music department at 803.321.5633 or email debbie.jarman@newberry.edu.  

 

 

INSTRUMENTAL ENSEMBLE GROUPS

 

Brass Ensemble

Brass Ensemble performs regularly at college convocations and other campus functions and special events. 

 

Chamber Orchestra

The Chamber Orchestra is a campus/community partnership that is open to both Newberry College students and community members. The orchestra performs music literature from the Baroque period to the 21st century and is under the direction of Dr. Patrick Casey. Email patrick.casey@newberry.edu or call 803.321.5634. 

 

Guitar Ensemble

Guitar Ensemble is small ensemble of guitar and non-guitar majors who perform a wide variety of music genres from Renaissance to Modern to Pop.  

 

Jazz Big Band Ensemble

The Jazz Big Band plays several concerts each year and tours during spring semester. The group's energetic performances have been recorded on numerous CDs and performs at the statewide SCBDA Jazz Festival hosted annually by Newberry College. 

 

Jazz Combo 

The Jazz Combo is a small jazz group that performs frequently at both on-campus and off-campus venues and regional jazz festivals. The group also offers students many opportunities to hone their skills with jazz improvisation.

 

Percussion Ensemble

Percussion Ensemble plays inventive arrangements and standard literature for a wide variety of percussion combinations.

 

Wind Ensemble

Students in the Wind Ensemble perform both standard band literature as well as contemporary wind ensemble music designed for this smaller instrumentation. Participation in this ensemble is required for all instrumental music majors and is open to all students, both music and non-music majors. . The Wind Ensemble is under the director of Dr. Jerry Gatch. Email jerry.gatch@newberry.edu or call 803.321.5180.

 

Woodwind Ensembles

Woodwind Ensembles include saxophone ensemble, clarinet ensemble, flute ensemble and woodwind quintet, depending on student interest and studio personnel. These groups perform their own concerts and often perform at special campus functions. 

 

 

SPIRIT GROUPS

 

Scarlet Spirit Marching Band

The Scarlet Spirit Marching Band is a corps-style ensemble that performs at all home football games. Newberry is the only Lutheran college in the country with a marching band. Athletic Bands are under the director of Mr. David Santiago. Email david.santiago@newberry.edu or call 803.321.5179.

 

Scar's Army Pep Band

Scar's Army Pep Band performs at on-campus athletic events during spring semester. 

 

 

VOCAL ENSEMBLE GROUPS

 

Madrigals 

Madrigals is an auditioned vocal ensemble that presents stunning performances of choral chamber music from a wide variety of periods. This group presents several concerts each year and tours with the Newberry College Singers. The Madrigals are under the direction of Dr. Chris Sheppard. Email chris.sheppard@newberry.edu or call 803.321.5181.

 

Newberry College Singers 

Newberry College Singers was founded in 1931, and is one of the oldest groups on campus. This premier choir tours annually and performs choral masterworks that range from the Middle Ages through the 21st century. Singers are under the direction of Dr. Chris Sheppard. Email chris.sheppard@newberry.edu or call 803.321.5181.

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Retired Faculty

A Tribute to Our Retired Music Faculty

"The strength of any institution of higher learning is measured by the quality of the faculty members of the academic unit.

 

At Newberry College, particularly in the Department of Music, that quality has been observed in and out of the classroom. Knowledge of the subject matter professed by faculty members has always been more than adequate and often exceptional, but a far more difficult assessment is the extent to which dedicated Newberry Music department faculty members cared for and mentored all of their students. Their concern never stopped outside of classes or at the end of the business day. They were always available to each of us for a gentle nudge or a swift admonition when needed. Ability was noticed and nurtured when it was often not evident, and our mentors were creative and diligent in finding methods to urge each and every student to reach his or her highest potential.

 

It is not an exaggeration by any means to say that many of us would not have fared as well as we have without the loving guidance of these dedicated individuals. They labored to impart knowledge and support to generations of students with little in the way of financial or personal gain. Many of their efforts have been forgotten or never reported, but the retired professors of the Newberry College Department of Music will live forever in the hearts and minds of thousands of grateful former students."

 

Dr. Benny Ferguson '70

 

*** *** *** *** *** *** *** 

 

Dr. Milton W. Moore   
Charles "Chief" Pruitt  
Dr. John W. Wagner  
Dr. W. Darr Wise  
Dr. Julie H. McLeod  
William "Bill" Long  

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Newberry College Jazz Festival

The longest-running jazz festival of its kind in the country

The Newberry College Jazz Festival welcomes the state's premier high school jazz musicians as host to the annual South Carolina Band Directors Association All-State Jazz Performance Assessment, which includes nationally recognized guest clinicians and adjudicators. The Newberry College Jazz Big Band plays a concert during the weekend event. For details about the SCBDA Jazz Performance Assessment, visit https://www.bandlink.org/jazz/jazz-festival/

Jazz Big Band Concert at the Newberry Jazz Festival

Check back for information about the featured performance of the Jazz Big Band.

Jazz Tour

Each Spring the Jazz Big Band performs a concert tour throughout different regions of the state.  Recent tour highlights include concerts in Chapin, Sumter, Charleston, Myrtle Beach, and Lexington.

Recent Guest Artists

Delfeayo Marsalis, trombone

Chris Vadala, saxophone

Denis DiBlasio, saxophone

Howard Levy, harmonica

Victor Wooten, bass

Steve Bailey, bass

Terell Stafford, trumpet

Al Chez, trumpet

Roger Pemberton, saxophone

“Blue Lou” Marini, saxophone

Allen Vizutti, trumpet

Wyclef Gordon, trombone

Charles P. Pruitt Jazz Award

Each year a student in the Newberry College Jazz Big Band is awarded the Most Valuable Player of the Year in honor of longtime band director, Charles “Chief” Pruitt. Students who receive this award are added to a commemorative plaque located in the Alumni Music Center. 

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ORCHESTRAL STRING PROGRAM

Our Orchestral String Program

The Newberry College Department of Music offers string students of all degree areas the opportunity to perform in orchestral and chamber music settings. Collaborating with orchestral musicians from the region, the Newberry Chamber Orchestra explores a wide range of music, often featuring professional soloists and joining forces with other arts organizations.  We have an outstanding string faculty who teach applied lessons and masterclasses::

 
Andrew Lynn    Violin & Viola
Tzu-Ying Liao    Violoncello
Austin Gaboriau    Double Bass

 

For more information about the Orchestral String Program, please contact Dr. Patrick Casey at (803) 321-5634. 

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NEWBERRY CHAMBER ORCHESTRA

NEWBERRY CHAMBER ORCHESTRA

The Newberry Chamber Orchestra (NCO) is a college-community or town and gown orchestra and is open to students, faculty, staff, and community members in the region. The NCO performs orchestral music from the Baroque to the 20th century and rehearses every Monday evening from 6:30-8:30 pm on the Newberry College campus.  For more information please contact Dr. Patrick Casey at (803) 321-5634 or patrick.casey@newberry.edu

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MUSIC NEWSLETTERS

MUSIC NEWSLETTERS

 Newberry College Music Department Newsletters (.pdf Format)


 2000-2001
 2001-2002
 2002-2003
 2003-2004
 2004-2005
 2005-2006
 2006-2007
 2007-2008
 2008-2009
 2010-2011
 2011-2012
 2012-2013
 2012-2013 Newberry College Dimensions - Music Department Insert
 

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Music Major for a Day

Check back in June for more information about Music Major for a Day 2020

​The Department of Music invites prospective students and families to spend a day on the Newberry College campus to learn more about college life for music students at Newberry. This event is open to all current high school juniors and seniors who are interested in pursuing a music degree in college. Attendance is free. Lunch is provided for each student and ONE guest. Meals for additional guests may be purchased in the College Cafe during the lunch break. 

 

 

 

 

 

REGISTER FOR AUDITION (optional)

Students attending Music Major for a Day may audition at the conclusion of the event. Click here to register in advance for your audition. 

 

 

Schedule of Activities

  • Registration
  • Welcome and Introduction of Music Faculty
  • Music Admission and Scholarships
  • Masterclasses with Newberry College Faculty
  • Q & A Session with Current Newberry Music Majors
  • Lunch in the Campus Cafe
  • Performances by Madrigals, Jazz Big Band and Chamber Ensembles.
  • Rehearsals with Wind Ensemble, Newberry College Singers and Chamber Orchestra. **Bring your instrument to sit in with our College ensembles!.**

 

 

Questions? 

Contact the Newberry College Department of Music. Email debbie.jarman@newberry.edu or call 803.321.5633.

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Make a Gift to Music

Newberry College Friends of Music

We gratefully welcome your support for the Newberry College Department of Music.

 

Click here to make an online gift to the Friends of Music

 

You may also mail your donation to: 

Newberry College Friends of Music
Department of Music
2100 College Street
Newberry, SC 29108

 

All donations are greatly appreciated! 

Dr. Sally Cherrington-Beggs Memorial Scholarship

Sally Cherrington-Beggs HeadshotThe Newberry College Music Department and the Cherrington-Beggs family established the Dr. Sally Cherrington-Beggs Memorial Scholarship to honor the memory of "Dr. Sally," who lost her three-year battle with a rare sinus-brain cancer in March 2012. In the final 12 years of her life, Dr. Sally served as Chair of the Department of Music and College Organist. Under her leadership the Alumni Music Center was refurbished, the department doubled in size and established itself as one of South Carolina's premiere private college music programs.

 

Dr. Sally represented the College nationally as a recitalist and workshop clinician at events sponsored by the American Guild of Organists, the Organ Historical Society and the Association of Lutheran Church Musicians and Augsburg-Fortress Press. Her deepest passion, however, was the integration of music into the worship experience of the Church.

 

The Dr. Sally Cherrington Beggs Memorial Scholarship is intended to honor her memory and to promote the cultivation of promising organists/musicians who are dedicated to using their talents to enrich the worship life of the Church. If you know prospective students who would be suitable candidates for this scholarship, please contact the Department of Music. 

 

MAKE A GIFT

Click here to make an online gift to the Dr. Sally Cherrington-Beggs Memorial Scholarship
 

Or mail your donation to: 

Newberry College Office of Advancement
Sally Cherrington-Beggs Scholarship
2100 College Street
Newberry, SC 29108

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Auditions

Auditions

Once your application to Newberry College is complete, schedule an audition during one of our audition days. An audition is required for you to be considered for admission to the Department of Music as a music major. Auditions for woodwind, brass, percussion, voice, strings, piano and guitar are held during all of the audition dates below except where otherwise noted.

 

Department of Music Auditions Move Online

Students who need to complete a Newberry music audition can now use our online submission process. Completing an audition online as opposed to in-person will not negatively impact any music admission decision or scholarship award. The priority scholarship deadline is Friday, April 17.


All online auditions will include:
• Two prepared pieces uploaded to YouTube
• Personal introduction uploaded to YouTube
• Sight-reading and tonal memory assessment via online Zoom meeting.

 

For more details regarding online auditions, click here. For questions and additional information, email Lauren Vaughn.

 

Audition Requirements

Students should prepare for their audition using the guidelines below. For questions about specific audition repertoire, contact Dr. Chris Sheppard, chair of the Department of Music at chris.sheppard@newberry.edu

 

BRASS & WOODWIND
Students should prepare two solos demonstrating contrasting styles and major scales. An All-State/Region solo may take the place of one of the two prepared solos. The audition also will include sight-reading, tonal memory assessment and a diagnostic music knowledge test (for placement purposes only). Accompaniment is not required.

 

PERCUSSION
Students should prepare a solo/etude on snare drum, a solo/etude on the marimba or timpani (if studied), and major scales on a mallet instrument (marimba, xylophone or vibraphone). Students with drumset experience should demonstrate the following styles: funk/rock, swing, latin/samba and bossa nova. The audition also will include sight-reading, tonal memory assessment and a diagnostic music knowledge test (for placement purposes only). 

 

PIANO
Students should prepare major scales in four octaves and two prepared pieces including a movement of Classical, Sonata, and one contrasting piece. The audition also will include sight-reading, tonal memory assessment and a diagnostic music knowledge test (for placement purposes only).

 

STRINGS
Students should prepare two solos demonstrating contrasting styles and major scales. The audition also will  include sight-reading, tonal memory assessment and a diagnostic music knowledge test (for placement purposes only). Accompaniment is not required.

 

VOICE
Students should prepare two songs of contrasting styles. The audition also will include sight-reading, tonal memory assessment and a diagnostic music knowledge test (for placement purposes only). A piano accompanist from the college will be provided upon request. Email your piano scores at least one week in advance of your audition date to debbie.jarman@newberry.edu or fax 803.321.5175. 

 

GUITAR
Students should prepare two solos demonstrating contrasting styles (Classical or Jazz preferred) and major scales. The audition also will include sight-reading, tonal memory assessment and a diagnostic music knowledge test (for placement purposes only). Accompaniment is not required.

 

Register for an Audition

To register for an audition, click here to complete the Music Audition Form

 

Questions?

If you have questions or need additional information, please contact Music Department Administrative Assistant Debbie Jarman at Debbie.Jarman@newberry.edu or call 803.321.5633. Send faxes to 803.321.5175. 

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Veterans Program

Veterans Benefits

Newberry College, an accredited institution, is a military friendly college and a participant in the Yellow Ribbon Program. More information is available in the Office of the Registrar.

 

REGISTRAR

The Office of the Registrar is located in Holland Hall, first floor. Call the Registrar at 803-321-5124. Contact Veterans Affairs Representative Whitney Merinar at 803.321.5125 or email whitney.merinar@newberry.edu

Determining Your GI Benefits

Your can determine your eligibility and benefit amounts using VA GI Bill® Comparison Tool on the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs. Go to https://www.benefits.va.gov/giBill/

 

Use the steps below to help you compare benefits and gather the necessary documentation to request education benefits. 

 

STEP 1

Determine your best benefit. This page indicates what types of benefits are rewarded for various types of study and informs you of various education options and their related benefits. For Newberry Online students, please note that if you are online classes, you qualify for one-half the national average monthly housing allowance under the Post-9/11 GI Bill®.

 

STEP 2

Collect Your Information. You will need the following documents:

  • DD214 Certificate of Release or Discharge from Active Duty for most recent period of active duty
  • Transcripts for all periods of education after high school.
  • Kicker Contract (the Department of Defense may be able to provide this information if you cannot locate a copy of the contract.)

 

STEP 3

Compare Programs and Choose a School. The maximum in-state fee for South Carolina is $4,305.50 and $484.00 per credit hour. (This does not apply for active duty service personnel.) The zip code for Newberry College is 29108. Newberry College participates in the Yellow Ribbon Program. Information on tuition and fess is available at https://www.newberry.edu/admission

 

STEP 4

Apply Online. Newberry College’s VA Certifying Officer is Tanika Beard in the Office of the Registrar. The Registrar must receive the following information for the certification process: 

  • Certificate of Release or Discharge from Active Duty (DD form 214) for all periods of active duty service
  • DD Form 2384, also known as the Notice of Basic Eligibility, if applying for the Montgomery GI Bill® for Selected Reserves (chapter 1606)
  • Copies of orders if activated from the guard/reserves
  • Supporting documents (e.g., vouchers, statements) for buy-up or buy-in contributions, which may allow you to make a small initial payment so that you can receive a higher monthly payment.
  • College fund “kicker” contracts for additional monthly payments that you may receive from the Department of Defense through your branch of the Service

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Study Abroad Programs

Study Abroad

Students who take foreign language classes have the opportunity to receive academic credit for study in a foreign country for a summer, a semester, or two semesters.

Through Central College in Pella, Iowa, Newberry College is a member of a consortium offering a variety of foreign study programs. Many other study-abroad programs are available through different universities. Faculty can advise and assist students in enrolling directly in a study-abroad program of their choice. Normally, the cost of tuition, room, and partial board will not exceed expenses for the same period of time on the Newberry campus. Courses offered abroad are taught in the native language. Qualified students may enroll in these and other accredited programs. Students interested in making the study-abroad program a part of their Newberry College experience should contact Dr. Gregory Cole.

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Office of Disability Services

Office of Disability Services 

 

Our Mission 

The mission of Disability Services in the Center for Student Success is to empower disabled students to seek academic and personal success through maximizing ability and encouraging full participation. Services are offered to students with various exceptionalities as they navigate the varying demands of the Newberry College experience. Length of services may vary from a short period to the entire length of a student’s academic tenure at Newberry College.

 

Advocacy 

The laws concerning the rights and responsibilities of the College regarding students with disabilities differ from those you've navigated in high school. You'll be responsible for voluntarily disclosing your disability, providing documentation and requesting appropriate accommodations. These may be different from those you received in high school. 

In college, you'll advocate for yourself. We offer a student handbook that outlines your rights and responsibilities and prepares you for your greater role in managing your education and accommodations. Though the services may change, it's important you inform us about your past, so we're able to provide the right support. 

 

Family  

Parents and guardians are a critical component to all aspects of the educational trajectory, however, that involvement does shift once a student becomes 18 years of age and is admitted to a college or university. At that time, parents and guardians are not legally allowed access to a student's educational information. The Federal Education and Right to Privacy Act (FERPA) allows for the release of private and confidential information to specified persons. Families are allowed to access information if a student has signed a release of information form. If you are in need of a release of information form, please stop by the Center for Student Success. 

 

Common Accommodations 

Newberry College is committed to providing students with equitable access and participation in academics and other programs sponsored by the College as mandated by federal law. The process for granting accommodations to qualified students with documented disabilities is managed by the Coordinator of Disability Services.

 

Faculty should only implement accommodations approved by the Coordinator of Disability Services, who will provide students with a letter describing approved classroom accommodations. Students are responsible for providing this letter to faculty prior to before the need arises. 

 

By law, disability and accommodation information should be kept private, and only shared with College personnel who have a legitimate educational need to know. 

 

Some common accommodations include:

  1. Providing a distraction-free environment for test taking
  2. Providing additional time to complete course tasks
  3. Permission to audio-record lectures
  4. Access to laptop / tablet for notetaking
  5. Access to faculty lecture notes
  6. Priority seating 
  7. Substitution of courses 
  8. Access to alternate material / media (i.e. Braille, audio versions, etc.)

 

Contact Information

LaShawn Hanes, 803.321.5277 

Coordinator of Disability Services

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Diversity Education

Welcome from the Director of Diversity Education


Peggy B. Winder, PhD.

 

Allow me to introduce myself. My name is Dr. Peggy Barnes-Winder and I am a professor in the Department of Sport Professions and the Director of Diversity Education. Welcome to this amazing place called “Newberry College”! It is both a privilege and an honor for me to address you today.  As a graduate of Newberry College, it is my sincere hope that your experience here is one that you will never forget. Having been at Newberry for over 20 years, I can honestly say that my time spent here as a former student and now as a professor and administrator, have been some of the best days of my life. Take time to learn all you can about Newberry College and its rich History and I guarantee you will not be disappointed. Whether you are a freshman, transfer, or non-traditional student, know that we are here to help you succeed in any way that we can.  You will quickly learn that we are family and regardless of your race, gender, religion ethnicity, sexual orientation, age and/ or ability, everyone will be treated with the dignity and respect you are entitled to as human beings. Begin your journey at Newberry College and allow the Newberry College Family to help guide you in the right direction!

Mission

The Office for Diversity Education is committed to building and maintaining a more inclusive and welcoming environment for EVERYONE on the Newberry College Campus. Through educational initiatives and action, the Institution will focus on implementing and supporting the college’s commitment to promote personal and social acceptance, development, awareness and understanding of diversity, multiculturalism, and social equity. 

 

Through collaborative efforts, working with various departments, groups, and organizations within the Newberry campus community, we will work to implement diversity goals and initiatives that support the strategic plan, the QEP and the mission and values of Newberry College.  Our goal is to promote kindness and acceptance among the campus environment and beyond where diversity is valued and appreciated within an atmosphere of respect for ALL people.

WHY IS DIVERSITY IMPORTANT?

Aaron Thompson, professor of Sociology at EKU and coauthor, Joe Cuseo of “Diversity and the College Experience” provides 8 reasons why DIVERSITY is important and I wholeheartedly support each of these reasons:

 

1. Diversity expands worldliness. College might be the first time you have had the opportunity to have real interaction with people from diverse groups. Whether we like it or not, many times we find ourselves segregated from other groups in schools, churches, and our own neighborhoods. A college campus is like opening the door to the entire world without traveling anywhere else.
2. Diversity enhances social development. Interacting with people from a variety of groups widens your social circle by expanding the pool of people with whom you can associate and develop relationships. Consider how boring your conversations would be if you only had friends who had everything in common with you.
3. Diversity prepares students for future career success. Successful performance in today's diverse workforce requires sensitivity to human differences and the ability to relate to people from different cultural backgrounds. America's workforce is more diverse than at any time in the nation's history, and the percentage of America's working-age population comprised of members of minority groups is expected to increase from 34 percent to 55 percent by 2050.
4. Diversity prepares students for work in a global society. No matter what profession you enter, you'll find yourself working with employers, employees, coworkers, customers and clients from diverse backgrounds—worldwide. By experiencing diversity in college, you are laying the groundwork to be comfortable working and interacting with a variety of individuals of all nationalities.
5. Interactions with people different from ourselves increase our knowledge base. Research consistently shows that we learn more from people who are different from us than we do from people who are similar to us. Just as you "think harder" when you encounter new material in a college course, you will do the same when you interact with a diverse group of people.
6. Diversity promotes creative thinking. Diversity expands your capacity for viewing issues or problems from multiple perspectives, angles, and vantage points. These diverse vantage points work to your advantage when you encounter new problems in different contexts and situations. Rather than viewing the world through a single-focus lens, you are able to expand your views and consider multiple options when making decisions and weighing issues of, for example, morality and ethics.
7. Diversity enhances self-awareness. Learning from people whose backgrounds and experiences differ from your own sharpens your self-knowledge and self-insight by allowing you to compare and contrast your life experiences with others whose life experiences differ sharply from your own. By being more self-aware, you are more capable of making informed decisions about your academic and professional future.
8. Diversity enriches the multiple perspectives developed by a liberal arts education. Diversity magnifies the power of a general education by helping to liberate you from the tunnel vision of an ethnocentric and egocentric viewpoint. By moving beyond yourself, you gain a panoramic perspective of the world around you and a more complete view of your place in it.

©2009 Professors ' Guide LLC. All rights reserved.

Promoting the Importance of Diversity:

A campus cannot be diverse if it is not "INCLUSIVE". In an effort to promote the importance of Diversity on our campus, in 2012, Newberry College implemented the Campus Alliance for Respect and Diversity (C.A.R.D.) program. This is a Safe Zone Ally program made available to ALL of our students, faculty, and staff. The C.A.R.D. program aims to make the Newberry Community a more welcoming and inclusive environment for all and decrease discrimination against individuals who in some way may be different from us.  Please note that all C.A.R.D. Ally members must complete an orientation training before becoming a Campus Ally.   The program allows individuals to share their thoughts, issues, and/or concerns with Ally’s in confidence and free from judgment. These safe havens are identified by displaying stickers and placards in visible areas signifying that the area is safe and free from discrimination of any type.

To learn more about the C.A.R.D. program,  please contact Dr. Peggy Winder, Director of Diversity Education at 803-321-5161.

 

You may also contact any of our C.A.R.D. Allies with questions or concerns.

Faculty/ Staff Allies: 

Dr. Peggy Winder Dr. Christina Wendland Prof.Gretchen Haskett
Dr. John Lesaine Pastor Ernie Worman Dr. Jennifer Martinsen 
Dr. Valerie Burnett Dr. Jodie Peeler Dr. Amanda Hodges
Dr. Krista Hughes Ms. Martha Dorell Dr. Timothy Elston
President Maurice Scherrens Dr. Sandy Scherrens Dr. Sara Peters
     
     

 

Student Allies:

     
     
     
     
     
     

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Career Services

Office of Career Services

The Office of Career Services provides a variety of career and professional development activities and support throughout a Newberry student's career to give them the relevant support at the most appropriate times to ensure they are prepared to succeed in the job market. 

Our Mission

To develop and equip every Newberry College student to explore, define, articulate and pursue their personal, educational and career goals.

 

Our Vision

Newberry students will graduate with the clarity, confidence and capacities to pursue a successful and fulfilling career.

Students

Wolves2Work is the place for all things career at Newberry College. You can find internships, part-time jobs and career jobs here. We want to ensure that that your are competitive in the workplace. Your first step is to create a profile that gets you noticed by employers who are looking for interns and employees.

Create your account today by clicking here:  Wolves2Work

Employers

Wolves2Work, powered by Purple Briefcase, is the best place to post part-time jobs, full-time jobs, internship and cooperative learning opportunities, and connect with Newberry College students for your hiring needs.

 

Get started!

Create your free account today by clicking here: Wolves2Work

  • Under New User, select New Employer 

  • Navigate to the My Schools pagescroll down to the Request Access section and select South Carolina (SC).

  • After all the schools load, scroll to Newberry College in Newberry, SC, and click Request Connection.

  • Newberry College will approve your profile within two business days after which you will be able to post jobs, connect with prospective employees and register for on-campus recruiting opportunities. 

 

Faculty/Staff Access

Faculty/Staff access is the same access level as students. Having your own access can be beneficial for advisors to show students how the career management system is used and how it can benefit them. To post jobs within Newberry College, you will need New Employer access. Click here to set up an account: Wolves2Work

Year-by-Year Support Process

Freshman Year -- Exploring
Self-exploration is an important part of the first year of college. It is during this crucial year that students begin to fine-tune and focus their goals. To help facilitate this process, the Career Services office coordinates events and programs that help students assess interests, values, strengths and direction. This programming is integrated into the academic experience and is major specific.

 

Sophomore Year -- Selecting
As students select and declare a major, discipline and industry specific professional development becomes a crucial part of the college experience. At this point it is imperative that students begin developing their personal, professional brand and begin building their personal network. The Career Service office provides training and tools for students and faculty to use as the students begins transitioning from student to young professional. An initial resume is prepared during this time, and basic interviewing and networking skills are developed.

 

Junior Year -- Experiencing
At this phase of their college career Experiential Learning becomes imperative. Internships, co-ops, clinical training and student teaching become a cornerstone of a student's education. Students interested in pursuing a graduate degree should begin researching programs, preparing for graduate entrance exams and visiting schools. Career Services can provide support to students as they pursue these opportunities, ensuring that student resumes are professionally prepared and that students are skilled in interviewing.

 

Senior Year -- Transitioning
As a student’s college career nears completion, the transition into the professional world begins. Students should be actively engaged in applying for positions that fit their interests and skills or applying to relevant graduate programs. Career Services works closely with seniors on tactical and strategic issues. 

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Herbarium

Newberry College Herbarium

Location Science and Math Building Room 223
Newberry College, 2100 College Street, Newberry, SC 29108
Curator: Dr. Charles Horn (E-mail: charles.horn@newberry.edu Phone: 803-321-5257)
Herbarium started: 1986
Index Herbariorum abbreviation: NBYC
Collection size: 21,500 (September 2014)

 

NBYC collection geographical scope:

A majority of the specimens are of collections in South Carolina and represent plants growing in the piedmont region of the state. There are a number of specimens from the piedmont of North Carolina and Virginia. Also included are some collections from the Bahamas, Belize, Dominica, and Guyana.

Important collections:

Flora of South Carolina
Voucher specimens for flora projects, including Lynch's Woods (Newberry County), Sumter National Forest (Fairfield, Laurens, Newberry, Union Counties), Saluda Shoals County Park (Lexington County), Little Mountain (Newberry County).
Collections of the following genera: Asimina/em>(Annonaceae), Dirca (Thymeliaceae), Heteranthera (Pontederiaceae), Rhododendron (Ericaceae)

Value of an Herbarium

An herbarium is a repository for pressed and dried plant material. These collections (or specimens) are a permanent record of where and when a plant existed in nature. Herbaria (plural of herbarium) have several important functions:

  • Provides a reference collection for the identification of plants.
  • Specimens provide information on the location and time a plant grew in the past. This information can be used to predict the future for a plant species.
  • The herbarium is a repository for voucher specimens for flora and research projects; documenting the distribution of a species and recording information on what species are found at a location. For example, NBYC has specimens to document the plants found at Lynch's Woods Park in Newberry County. It may also be the sources for anatomical and morphological research.
  • Serves as a base collection for teaching botany classes. Our collection is used in a number of botany classes I teach.

 

WHAT MAKES AN HERBARIUM COLLECTION VALUABLE?
Herbaria are of value because they contain many bits of information in a historical sense - plants collected at a particular location at a particular time. The oldest herbarium is the Naturkundemuseum Kassel, in the Federal Republic of Germany; it was established in 1569 (information from Index Herbariorum). In order for specimens to remain preserved for hundreds of years, several concerns need to be addressed relative to maintaining a collection.  

  1. Plant material is collected, pressed flat and dried. This is usually with the aid of corregate cardboard and a heat source.
  2. Specimens are glued (or attached in some similar way) on sheets of approximately 11x17 inch paper. This makes for ease of reviewing the specimens, keeps all material together, yet visible, and documents a single collection.
  3. The collection needs to be preserved to prevent damage, thus are most commonly stored in air-tight cabinets. Several concerns are evident when specimens are not properly stored, including specimens loose color when exposed to light, changes in humidity can hurt the plants and glue, and of greatest importance, insects can damage exposed specimens. 
  4. For convenience sake, the collection needs to be in an order so persons can find specimens quickly. Typically, specimens are either filed alphabetical by family, then by genus, or the families are arranged in systematic order using a recent evolutionary scheme. 

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Thank You

Thank You!

We've received your contact information and will be in touch with you shortly.

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Registrar

Location and Contact Information

The Office of the Registrar is located on the first floor of Holland Hall. Call the Registrar's Office at 803-321-5124 or email us.

 

Transcript Requests

To request an official Transcript, please complete the following transcript online order system. The transcript fee is $5.00 each after the first copy has been issued. If the transcript is faxed, that is an additional $2.00. We accept Mastercard or VISA.

Newberry College 
Office of the Registrar 
2100 College Street
Newberry, SC 29108
Fax to: 803-321-5126 

 

Change of Address or Phone Number

Any change in a student's address or phone number, whether on or off-campus, must be reported to the Office of the Registrar within 72 hours. All students should also notify the Registrar of any change of address or phone number of their parents or guardians.

 

Marriages (Name Changes)

Any change in marital status of any student must be reported to the Office of the Registrar and the Dean of Students immediately.

 

Class Schedules

Click here to link to the list of class schedules

 

Declaring a Major

Students at Newberry College who will have completed 56 semester hours by fall semester are required to declare their major no later than the preceding May 1st. Students declare their major by securing the approval of the major department chairperson and completing and filing copies of the Degree Audit with the Office of the Registrar. The department chairperson will assign the student an advisor.

 

Dropping a Course

Students may drop a course by obtaining a drop form from the Office of the Registrar, securing their faculty advisor's and instructor's signatures, and returning the form to the Office of the Registrar. Failure to follow this procedure may result in a grade of FA. A course may be dropped no later than one week after mid-term grades are reported. Students are also cautioned that dropping courses may affect their financial aid.

 

Enrollment Verification

Enrollment verification requests may be submitted to the Registrar's office using our online request form. For questions about enrollment verification, please email the Registrar's office at records@newberry.edu or call 803.321.5124

 

 If you have any questions regarding these forms, please email Records@Newberry.edu or call the Office of the Registrar at 803.321.5124.

 

Repeating a Course

Students who receive a grade of "D" ,"D+", "F", or "FA" on a course at Newberry may request to repeat the course and have their GPA reflect the higher grade, for the first repeat only. The request for an adjusted GPA must be made during the registration period for the course that is to be repeated. The course must be repeated at Newberry College to receive the benefit of the adjusted grade policy.

 

Veteran's Benefits

Newberry College is an accredited institution under provisions of all the public laws for providing educational benefits for qualified veterans and dependents of veterans. More information is available from the Office of the Registrar.

 

Withdrawing from the College

Students who withdraw from Newberry College before the end of a semester are required to complete a Withdrawal Form available from the Office of the Registrar. The form lists procedures to follow that will help them plan and facilitate readmission to Newberry College or transfer to another college. Failure to complete the appropriate forms when withdrawing from Newberry College will result in a grade of "FA" for each enrolled course. It may also jeopardize readmission to Newberry College and transfer eligibility.

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Center for Student Success

The Center for Student Success supports Newberry College students throughout their educational journey by providing a variety of academic support services. Our academic specialists offer a personalized, one-on-one approach to assist students with the self-management skills they need to be successful in the classroom. The Center works collaboratively across academic and administrative departments, monitoring success indicators, such as class attendance, personal behavior and academic performance, all with an eye toward helping students achieve their academic goals and persist to graduation.

 

The CSS is a one-stop student support center that provides:  

  • Academic Coaching and Mentoring 
  • Academic Advising  
  • Academic Engagement Programs & Services  
  • Learner Support (for students with disabilities & educational accommodations) 
  • Career Exploration & Preparation 
  • Early Alert & Academic Recovery 

 

Hours of Operation

8 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.
Alternate times may be arranged by appointment.

 

Location

Wessels Library

The Center for Student Success is in the library's main floor, adjacent to the commons area. 

 

Our Team

Dr. Sandy Scherrens

Associate Dean for Student Success and Persistence

803.321.3337 

 

Dr. John Lesaine

Assistant Dean for Student Success and Persistence

Assoc. Professor of Sport Professions 

Campus Site Coordinator - Call Me MiSTER Program 

803.321.5123

 

Barbara Joyner

Assistant Dean for Student Success and Persistence

Director of the Center for Student Success.

Director of Early Alert & Student Intervention

 

International Student Support

Primary Designated School Official (PDSO) - U.S. Dept. of Homeland Security

803.321.5625

 

Brittany Noble

Academic Success Coach

Athletics Liaison

803.321.5187

 

Patrick Smith

Director of Career Services

803.321.5362

 

Belle Mazurik

Assistant Director of the Center for Student Success

803.321.5148

LaShawn Hanes

Coordinator of Disability Services

803.321.5277

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Core Curriculum

Core Curriculum Requirements

The new 2014 Core Curriculum applies to all students who entered Newberry on or after Aug. 17, 2014. The Core Curriculum was revamped to better enable students to meet general education requirements and more fully align with the College’s mission and goals, which emphasize intellectual development, personal development, meaningful vocation and engaged citizenship in a global society. 

 

The new Core Curriculum places greater emphasis on the core competencies of critical thinking, communication and quantitative literacy. It is designed to give students basic exposure to the principal areas of knowledge, including humanities and fine arts, social and behavioral sciences, and natural sciences and mathematics while mastering the basic skills to prepare for life after graduation. 

General Education Core Curriculum Outline

See below for Course Type descriptions 

 

  1. Personal and Community Formation (total: 11 credit hours)
    1. ENG 113 (3 credits) (must earn a “C” or better)
    2. INQ 101 (3 credits) (Required of all freshman students)
    3. MAT 111, 121, 150, or 211 (3 credits)
    4. FIT 1XX (2 credits)
  2. Liberal and Empathetic Education ( total: 28 credit hours)
    1. OCC (Oral Communication) – SPE 110 (3 credits)
    2. HFA (One additional designated Humanities: ENG, HUM, ART, MUS, THE (3 credits)
    3. FLC (Foreign language: SPA, GER, GRE) (3 credits)
    4. GL1(Global learning 1= cultures)(3 credits)
    5. GL2(Global learning 2 = perspectives) (3 credits)
    6. GL3 (Global learning 3 = application of knowledge)(3 credits)
    7. REL 121-129 (3 credits)
    8. LSC (Lab Science) (4 credits)
    9. QLC (Quantitative literacy) (3 credits)
       
  3. Collaborative Learning and Practice ( total: 6 credit hours)
    1. Two interdisciplinary courses (3 credits each)
       
  4. Professional Knowledge and Experience – designated course within Major
     
  5. Intellectual, Social, and Civic Engagement – designated course within Major
     
  6. Graduation Requirement: Tagged Courses 
    1. ET (Ethics Course) (3 credits as part of Major)
    2. CE (Civic Engagement) – 2 courses (3 credits each)
    3. SB (Social and Behavioral Sciences) (3 credits)
    4. WI (Writing Intensive) – 3 courses (3 credits each) (at least one WI course must be outside major) (Cannot be waived for transfer students)
       
  7. Graduation Requirement: One May Term Course – (3 credits) – Interdisciplinary or Experiential Learning (One interdisciplinary course from May Term may count toward section C)

 

Notes:

  1. A single course may not satisfy multiple requirements in sections A-E.
  2. If a student is awarded transfer credit for a course that carries a Newberry College core tag, the student will also be awarded credit for the tag.  This policy does not apply to the WI tag; all WI requirements must be satisfied by Newberry College coursework.
  3. Please see the current catalog for greater detail.

Course Type Descriptions

Inquiry Courses (INQ)  A thematic, academic-based, writing and oral intensive course that serves as an introduction to the Quality Enhancement Plan and Values-Based Learning. Some course meetings will build assignments around a unique theme, while other course meetings will be common curriculum based on the QEP/VBL. 

 

Perspectives Courses  Courses designed to provide a basis in liberal arts. These courses will develop the critical thinking skills gained in the freshman INQ courses and expand knowledge in Humanities and Fine Arts.

 

Capstone Experience  Senior-level, discipline-specific course that integrates program learning outcomes and may include methods, skills, research and practice. These courses are part of the major with credit hours determined by the department. 

 

Interdisciplinary Coursework (IDS)  Uses methodologies of one discipline to expand learning in multiple disciplines. These creative courses integrate a theme or topic that is more effectively examined and explored through a multi-disciplinary approach. Courses are typically capped at 15 students. At least one of these interdisciplinary courses must be outside of the student‘s department. 

 

Experiential Learning  Applied learning that may incorporate engaged learning experiences or projects, such as civic engagement, service learning, community-based learning, etc. This work is part of the major and the credit hours are determined by the department. These experiences include Internships, program practicums, clinicals, study abroad/study away. 

 

Tagged Courses  Designed to meet key student learning outcomes that support the College mission and goals, tagged courses may change from year to year, so students and faculty should consult the most recent edition of the Newberry College Catalog to determine tagged courses for a given academic year.

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Victim Support Services

Victim Support Services

It can be traumatic to be the victim of a crime.  Feeling violated and vulnerable because someone has forcefully entered your private space and ransacked your personal belongings is an understandable reaction.  Fear that other types of crime will happen, anxiety, irritability, lack of sleep, and appetite problems are also common reactions.

 

If you have been the victim of a personal or property crime, support is available at any of the following locations:

 

On-Campus Support

Health & Counseling Services 803.321.5373 or 803.321.3316
Campus Pastor 803.947.2052
Dean of Students 803.321.5206
Director of Campus Security 803.321.5602

 

Off-Campus Support

Newberry County Sheriff 803.321.2211
City of Newberry Police Department 803.321.1010
Newberry County Solicitor's Office 803.321.2123

Sexual Assault Support Services

Newberry College is committed to creating a campus environment which will neither tolerate nor condone sexual violence. 

What to do if you are a victim of sexual violence:

  • Find a friend for support.
  • Get medical attention. A physical examination will help to assure that any injuries will be identified and treated and that sexually transmitted disease testing will be provided and followed up.
  • Evidence may be obtained and kept in case the victim decides to pursue criminal charges. Do not bathe, shower, douche or change clothes before the exam.
  • Report the crime. The decision to report is the victim's. There are several ways to take action, criminal prosecution or through the college’s disciplinary system or both. Contact Campus Security or the Dean of Students.
  • Seek counseling. Support through a trained counselor can help the victim understand and work through the trauma.
  • The Office of Student Affairs is responsible for college disciplinary procedures following a report of rape or sexual assault between students. Both accuser and accused are entitled to have an advisor present at all hearings and proceedings. Both parties shall be informed of the outcome of any disciplinary hearing. Possible sanctions for being found guilty include but are not limited to, expulsion, probation, counseling and other sanctions as deemed appropriate by the hearing body. The victim's academic and living situation will be changed upon request if reasonably available.

 

If you are a victim of an off campus assault, you should report this to the local police authority having jurisdiction. If you want assistance from the Campus Security Department with this process, a Newberry College Security Officer will accompany you upon request to the Newberry College Counselor.

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Post Office

General Information

The Newberry College Mail Center is located in Wright Hall in the heart of campus. From the Mail Center students may send mail, buy stamps, and receive mail and packages. All Newberry College students are assigned a post office box and key when first arriving on campus and will keep this same box for the duration of their academic career. Lost mailbox keys will result in a $50 charge to the student’s account.

Mailing Address

The following address format should always be used for your mail and packages to ensure delivery to the campus:

 

Name

NC #

2100 College Street

Newberry SC 29108-2126

Contact Information

Leslie Sligh, Mail Center Coordinator
803-321-5150
leslie.sligh@newberry.edu

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Federal Work Study

Federal Work Study

The Federal Work-Study Program provides jobs for undergraduate and graduate students with financial need, allowing them to earn money to help pay education expenses. The program encourages community service work and work related to each student’s course of study. Newberry College gives work-eligible students opportunities to be employed at many diverse jobs either on campus in various positions off campus in community service-related positions.  See the Student Employment Job Postings to select potential job positions.

 

 

How much will I make?

You’ll earn at least the current federal minimum wage.

 

How will I be paid?

You’ll be paid by the hour. Work study students receive their paychecks on the 15th of every month.

 

Are Federal Work-Study jobs on campus or off campus?

Both. If you work on campus, you’ll usually work for your school. If you work off campus, your employer will usually be a private nonprofit organization or a public agency, and the work performed must be in the public interest. .

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Loans

Federal Direct Stafford Loan

Stafford Loans are the primary federal loan for students. Stafford Loans are either subsidized (the government pays the interest while you're in school) or unsubsidized;(interest accrues while you are in school).

 

To receive a subsidized Stafford Loan, you must be able to demonstrate financial need. All students, regardless of need, are eligible for the unsubsidized Stafford Loan. Stafford Loans have a fixed interest rate of 4.29% for subsidized loans and 4.29% for unsubsidized loans. Repayment begins six months after you graduate or if you drop below half-time enrollment. The standard repayment term is 10 years; however, it is possible to get access to alternate repayment terms (extended, graduated and income contingent repayment) by consolidating the loans.

 

Amount
$5,500 (freshmen)
$6,500 (sophomores)
$7,500 (juniors, seniors)

 

Eligibility
Full-time or part-time student

 

How to Apply
Complete the FAFSA
Complete the Online Federal Entrance Interview 
Complete theDirect Loan Master Promissory Note

Federal Perkins Loan

Amount
Up to $4,000 based on financial need

 

Eligibility
Full-time or part-time students

 

How to Apply
Complete the FAFSA

Federal Parent Loan (PLUS)

The Federal Direct Parent Loan for Undergraduate Students (PLUS) lets parents borrow money to cover any costs not already covered by the student's financial aid package, up to the full cost of attendance. PLUS Loans have a fixed interest rate of 6.84%. A disbursement fee of 4.3% fee iis deducted from each disbursement of a PLUS Loan. Repayment begins 60 days after the loan is fully disbursed, and extends up to 10 years.

 

Eligibility
A modest credit check is conducted to assess the parent's credit history. If a parent is denied a Federal PLUS loan due to adverse credit history, the parent may reapply with a credit-worthy co-borrower or appeal the denial with the Direct Loan Origination Center. 

If the parent is denied a PLUS loan, the student becomes eligible for increased Stafford Loan limits.

 

Amount
Up to the full cost of the student's education

 

Eligibility
Parents of full-time or part-time dependent students

 

How to Apply
Complete a PLUS loan application

SC Teachers Loan Program

Repayment of the SC Teachers Loan is forgiven if the graduate teaches in a critical geographic area within South Carolina as determined by State.

 

Amount
Up to $2,500 (Freshmen, sophomores) 
Up to $5,000 (Juniors, Seniors)

 

Eligibility
Full-time student; South Carolina resident
Education major
Freshmen must be in the top 40% of their class and have an SAT or ACT score equal to or greater than the South Carolina average for their graduation year
Enrolled students must take and pass the SC EEE and have a 2.75 GPA

 

How to Apply
Complete the FAFSA
Complete the SC Teachers Loan application

Private Education Loans

Private Education Loans, also known as Alternative Education Loans, help bridge the gap between the actual cost of your education and the amount the government allows you to borrow in its programs.

 

The Newberry College Office of Financial Aid will work with any lender and servicing agency to process a private/alternative education loan for our students. It is important to note that this type of loan is typically more expensive than federal loans and should only be used when all other options, including federal loans, have been exhausted. The terms and conditions of alternative loans vary from lender to lender. We encourage all borrowers to carefully review and evaluate each program.

 

To ensure timely processing of your loan, please monitor your application once submitted. Each lender’s process varies, but all steps require by the lender must completed before a disbursement can be made to Newberry College.

 

We urge you to carefully consider all of your options before making a final decision. Click here to research and compare alternative loan programs using FASThoice. This tool from Great Lakes Educational Loan Services, Inc, has a private/alternative education loan selection tool that provides basic information on alternative loans and detailed listings of the various interest rates, borrower benefits, fees and repayment options.

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Grants

Newberry College Grants

Newberry College grants are awarded to both freshmen and upperclassmen to recognize service to the College and to the local community. 

 

How to Apply

Complete the FAFSA

Federal Pell Grant

Amount
$598 - $5,815/year based on financial need

 

Eligibility
Full-time or part-time students

Federal SEOG Grant

Amount
Up to $1,000/year

 

Eligibility
Full-time or part-time students

SC Tuition Grant

Amount
Up to $3,100/year

 

Eligibility
South Carolina resident with demonstrated need
Full-time student
One of these three criteria: 900 SAT score, 19 ACT score, top 75% of class

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South Carolina Scholarships

SC Palmetto Fellows Scholarship

Amounts
$6,700/year (freshmen)
$7,500/year (sophomores, juniors, and seniors)

 

Eligibility
South Carolina resident, full-time student
1200 SAT; 27 ACT
3.5 GPA at end of junior year of high school; Top 5% of class at end of sophomore or junior year

 

How to Apply
Contact your high school guidance counselor or the South Carolina Higher Education Commission at 803-737-2260

 

Click to view Terms & Conditions

SC Palmetto Fellows Enhancement Scholarship

Amount
$2,500/year (sophomores, juniors and seniors)

 

Eligibility
You must meet all criteria for the SC Palmetto Fellows Scholarship AND
Major in one of the following areas: science, mathematics, computer science or informational technology, engineering, science education, math education, or healthcare

 

How to Apply
Your transcript will be reviewed at the end of your freshman year

 

Click to view Terms & Conditions

SC Life Scholarship

Amount
$5,000/year (sophomores, juniors and seniors)

 

Eligibility
South Carolina resident; full-time student
Meet at least two of these criteria: 3.0 GPA; Top 30% of Class; 1100 SAT or 24 ACT

 

How to Apply
Complete an application for admission

 

Click to view Terms & Conditions

SC Life Enhancement Scholarship

Amount
$2,500/year (sophomores, juniors and seniors)

 

Eligibility
You must meet all criteria to receive the SC Life Scholarship AND
Major in one of the following areas: science, mathematics, computer science or informational technology, engineering, science education, math education, or healthcare.

Incoming fall freshmen who wish to qualify for the SC Life Enhancement Scholarship awards in their sophomore year must complete 14 credit hours in math and science during their freshman year.

 

How to Apply
Your transcript will be reviewed at the end of your freshman year

 

Click to view Terms & Conditions

SC Hope Scholarship

Amount
$2,800/year (freshman year only)

 

Eligibility
South Carolina resident
First-time freshman; full time student
3.0 GPA
Not eligible for the Life Scholarship

 

How to Apply
Complete an application for admission

 

Click to view Terms & Conditions

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Security

SECURITY

Campus Security serves all students, staff, faculty, and guests of Newberry College. All criminal offenses occurring on-campus or at College controlled property should be reported to Campus Security. The department operates twenty-four hours a day, seven days a week and is staffed by fully trained officers.
 

Learn more about how Newberry College keeps its students safe. 

 

C.A.T.S.  (report a crime with this anonymously e-mailed form)
Victim Support Services
Safe Areas
Emergency Info  (Including Emergency Alert sign-up)
Public Safety Policies
Safety Tips for Every Situation
Campus Crime Report

From the Director of Security

The mission of Newberry College Security is to work with all members of the campus community to preserve life, maintain human rights, protect property, and promote the educational objectives of Newberry College.

 

The objective of Newberry College Security is to enhance the quality of life on campus by working cooperatively with the campus community and within the regulations of the college to enforce the laws, preserve the peace, help build self confidence, and provide a safe and secure environment.

 

As our mission, we believe in setting the example. We are committed to providing high-quality, expedient service to the campus community. We strive for a safe and healthy environment through quality improvements and constant performance monitoring.

Our Services

Newberry College Security Officers are on duty 24-hours a day, 365 days a year for your safety and protection. The Newberry College Security Services operation consists of S.L.E.D. (South Carolina State Law Enforcement Division) trained security officers who are here to maintain a safe and inviting physical environment. Some of the duties of security officers include, but are not limited to:

 

  • Patrolling campus--exterior and interior; monitoring students, employees and visitors.
  • Traffic control—Assist in parking needs, issuing parking violations.
  • Locking and unlocking campus doors--interior and exterior.
  • Accompanying students to classroom and/or vehicles when they feel unsafe and request these services
  • Security officers respond in order of priority and level of emergency.

Our Officers

Full-time staff includes a Director of Campus Security, one Captain and five Campus Security Officers. All Security Officers are trained and certified in First Aid, CPR and Automatic External Defibrillator (AED). Officers conduct foot and vehicle patrols on-campus and are charged with the enforcement of applicable federal, state, local laws, as well as college policies and regulations. The Campus Security Department works cooperatively with the Newberry Police Department and other law enforcement agencies to ensure the safety of the campus community and may ask for assistance when a crime has been reported.

 

We recruit only the most qualified and professional security officers. Our officer selection process is one of the most comprehensive in the security industry, featuring:

  • A detailed application process
  • Stringent screening and interviewing of all applicants
  • Comprehensive pre-employment background investigations
  • Complete investigation of criminal history
  • Security enforcement training by a S.L.E.D. certified instructor

Need to contact a security officer?

  • 803-940-0672 or ext. 5600(from on-campus) for emergency help
  • 803-321-5600 or 803-940-0672 (from on-campus) for non-emergency assistance
  • 911(from off-campus) for emergency help
  • 803-940-0672 or 803-321-5600 (from off-campus) for non-emergency assistance

 

Security officers are equipped with radios and cell phones. Dial 5600 from an on-campus phone or (803) 940-0672. From an off-campus phone dial (803) 321-5600 or (803) 940-0672.

 

Security should be notified of any problems or crimes committed on the campus as well as calling 911 in the event of an emergency.

 

Paul Whitman - Director of Security
paul.whitman@newberry.edu

803-321-5602

Allied Barton Security
allied.barton@newberry.edu

How to Report a Crime or Emergency

To report a crime or an emergency on campus, call Campus Security. For anonymous reporting, go to the Security web Page and click on C.A.T.S. (College Anonymous Tip Site) Campus Security officers respond to all reports of crimes and emergencies and complete an “Incident Report” for any crime occurring on College property. As a service to the campus community, if requested by the complainant a Security report is filed with the Newberry Security Department.

 

Call 911 and or Campus Security if:

  • Someone is injured or ill
  • You see fire or smell smoke
  • You see something suspicious
  • Someone is hurting another
  • You see someone stealing something or vandalizing property
  • You have something stolen

 

If you are not sure if security is needed, call to let us respond and assess the situation. Call quickly. Don’t assume someone else has made the call. Try to provide accurate detailed information about the problem. Stay on the line until the dispatcher or the officer says it is ok to hang up. Depending upon the type of emergency the Campus Security officer may also request assistance from the Newberry Police Department, Fire Department or EMS. The Security 24/7 phone number is 803-940-0672 to report an emergency from on campus phones is extension 5600 or 803-940-0672.

 

Have you seen something we need to know about?

 

Please fill out the College Anonymous Tips by clicking on C.A.T.S. in the above right column on the current page.

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Health Services

Student Healthcare and Counseling Services

Health Services at Newberry College contributes to the physical, academic, emotional, and social development of students by providing quality healthcare for students. We do this through offering free general healthcare services, and by counseling students who are experiencing emotional/behavioral or learning difficulties. We are also committed to promoting healthy behaviors for all students through health education. Health and Counseling Services operates with a commitment to confidentiality, ethical behavior, and practices that reflect current research and professional standards. 

Office Hours and Location

Monday - Friday, 8:30 a.m. - 4 p.m. We are located behind the Science/Math building and across from Brokaw Hall. Services on campus are free of charge to all full-time students.

Available Services

Healthcare

 

  • Assessment and treatment of acute illness.
  • Collaborative work with a local physician
  • Testing for strep, flu, pregnancy, glucose, and urinalysis
  • Referrals to physicians, and resources within the community 
  • Education on health related topics

 

Physician services are contracted with Compass Family Medicine, P.A., for illness, injuries, and ongoing allergy injections. The physician's service bill is separate and filed through the student's private insurance. Students will need to provide insurance information and co-pay for physician services. 

 

Counseling

 

  • Confidential assessments. 
  • Individual and group therapies. 
  • Collaborative work with physicians. 
  • Referrals to other resources on campus and within the community. 
  • Consultation and educational services to assist in fostering an environment supportive of the intellectual, emotional, and social development of students. 

 

 

Notice of Medical Privacy Practices

Notice of Medical Privacy Practices.pdf

Staff

Martha Dorrell, MSW, LISW-CP
Director of Health and Counseling Services/Counselor
martha.dorrell@newberry.edu
Office: 803.321.5373
Fax: 803.321.5239 

 

Lisa Gibson NCC,LPC,LAC

Mental Health Counselor

lisa.gibson@newberry.edu

803.321.5271

 

Health Services Nurse

healthservices@newberry.edu

803. 321.3316

Health Services Packet

Health Services Packet

 

Each student is required to complete a Health Services Packet, which includes a medical history form and a record of immunization. The Health Services packet may be mailed to Health Services, 2100 College Street, Newberry, SC 29108, faxed to Health Services ,803.321.5239 or e-mailed. * The health forms for athletic participation are separate and need to be sent to the Athletic Office. If you have any questions regarding the athletic health forms, please contact 803.321.5166.

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