Academics

Course Descriptions

Technology Requirements for the Department of Humanities
To meet Program Learning Outcomes for the academic year 2013-14 and to provide access to technology, foreign language students will be required to use a laptop computer with wireless network capability meeting or exceeding the recommended requirements specified under the Technology Tab in Wolf Den. Such laptops must have the basic software functionality of Microsoft Word, PowerPoint, and Excel, available free of charge in Windows 365, accessed through the Technology Tab in Wolf Den.

Course Descriptions

REL 110. The Biblical Heritage. (3)
A study of the life, faith, and history of ancient Israel, early Judaism, and early Christianity through an examination of selected portions of the Old and New Testaments, with stress upon their relevance for modern humanity. Partially satisfies Core Curriculum requirements in Religion, Area F-1b.
Offered every semester.

REL 111. Hebrew Scriptures. (3)
This course provides an overview of the social and historical context of the ancient Israelite society
(from the age of the Patriarchs to the emergence of Second Temple Judaism), the literary character of the scriptures it produced and the theological content of those scriptures.
Satisfies Core Curriculum requirements in Religion, Area F-1a.

REL 112. New Testament. (3)
This course provides an overview of the emergent Christian community of the early Christian era (from the time of Jesus to the end of the Apostolic Age), the literary character of the scriptures it produced and the theological content of those scriptures.
Satisfies Core Curriculum requirements in Religion, Area F-1,a.
NOTE: Students may not take both REL 110 and the REL 111-112 sequence as their content will overlap.

 

REL 203. From the Apostles to the Reformers (History of Christianity I; ca. 100-ca. 1550). (3)
This course examines the institutional, intellectual, and social developments in the history of Christianity from its beginnings to the Reformation. Issues such as the relationship between church and state, theology and philosophy, piety and culture will be traced and analyzed in the wider context of the history of the Mediterranean and Western Worlds from later antiquity to the Reformation.
This course may be taken by History Majors to complete degree requirements in the field of History. (see pages 135-136) Satisfies Core requirement F-2.

REL 220. Religions of the World. (3)
The history, beliefs, and practices of major non-Christian religions, including Buddhism, Confucianism, Hinduism, Islam, Judaism, and Taoism.  Offered at departmental discretion. May be taken to satisfy Core requirement F-1b along with REL 110.

REL 250. Christian Vocation and Church Leadership. (1)
A study of the call to Christian service in the Church and the world. This course will examine the concepts of ministry and the call, the nature and structure of the Church, contemporary issues facing the Church, as well as resources and programs used by the Church to promote faith and service in local congregations. This course is open to students of all denominations and religious traditions. Offered at departmental discretion. This course may not be taken to fulfill any Core requirement.

REL 290. Religion and Popular Culture. (3)
This course explores the wide variety of religious perspectives and values communicated through the arts most accessible to the general public. Movies, television, music, and web-based communication will provide opportunities for investigation into and reflection on the role that religious ideas and values play in contemporary American society.
Offered at departmental discretion. May be taken to satisfy Core requirement F-1b along with REL 110.

 

REL 301. Jesus: His Religion and His Teachings. (3) 

 

Prerequisites: REL 110 or REL 112 completed with a grade of C+ or better.
The character, ministry, and teaching of Jesus Christ, based upon the New Testament, including an examination of modern interpretations of Jesus. Offered alternate years. May be taken to satisfy Core requirement F-1b along with REL 110.

REL 302. The Hebrew Prophets: Their Times and Message. (3)
Prerequisites: REL 110 or REL 111 completed with a grade of ―C+‖ or better.
A study of the development, characteristics, and messages of selected major and minor prophets of Israel and
Judah, with an emphasis upon their relevance for contemporary life.
Offered alternate years. May be taken to satisfy Core requirement F-1b along with REL 110.

REL 303. Paul: His Life, Writings, and Continuing Impact. (3)
Prerequisites: REL 110 or REL 112 completed with a grade of ―C+ or better.
A survey of the life of Paul and the development of his theology in response to the problems and heresies he faced as an apostle and a missionary, with a consideration of their impact upon 20th century theology.
Offered alternate years. May be taken to satisfy Core requirement F-1b along with REL 110.

REL 305. The General Epistles and the Johannine Literature. (3)
Prerequisite: REL 110 or REL 112 completed with a grade of ―C+‖ or better.
A study of the non-Pauline epistles in the New Testament and those writings associated with the name of
John, including Revelation.
Offered alternate years. May be taken to satisfy Core requirement F-1,b along with REL 110.

REL 310. American Religious History. (3)
A study of the major trends, issues, persons, and movements in American religious history in their social, cultural, and political contexts..
Offered at departmental discretion. This course may be taken by History Majors to complete degree requirements in the field on History (see pages 135-136).

REL 320. African-American Religious History. (3)
A study of the major trends, issues, persons and movements in African-American religious history. Special attention will be paid to Civil Rights, sociological factors affecting religion in America, and the politics
of Religion.
Offered at departmental discretion.

REL 322. History of Lutherans and Lutheranism. (3)
This course investigates the unique character of Lutheranism as a Christian faith. People, places, and events important in shaping the contemporary Lutheran Church will be examined in an effort to help students
clarify their own Christian identities.
Satisfies Core requirement F-2.

REL 330. Christian Education. (3)
This course will provide a very practical introduction to the problems encountered and ―best practices‖ employed by Church Leaders in the area of Christian Education. Attention will be paid to curriculum selection or development, effective teaching methods, volunteer teacher recruitment and training, and issues related to staff and supervisory boards.
Does NOT satisfy Core Curriculum requirements for Religion & Ethics, Area F. Offered at departmental discretion.
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REL 340. Youth Ministry. (3)
This course will provide a very practical introduction to the problems encountered and ―best practices‖ employed by Church Leaders in the area of Youth Ministry. Attention will be paid to youth outreach and support strategies, program organization, curriculum selection or development, effective teaching methods, unique challenges and issues related to pre-adolescent and adolescent youth, and issues related to staff and supervisory boards.
Does NOT satisfy Core Curriculum requirements for Religion & Ethics, Area F. Offered at departmental discretion.

REL 350. Systematic Theology. (3)
This course examines the main themes of Christian theology in their classical formulation, traditional development, and contemporary expression. A seminar approach will be adopted in the course. Students will actively cooperate in developing the course content through the completion of reading assignments, outside research, formal presentation of material, and participation in discussion and debate. The textbook and instructor will serve primarily to describe the content and variety of influential positions taken on the main themes in theology. Students will take the initiative in advancing and defending particular views on the issues described.
Offered alternate years. May be taken to satisfy Core requirement F-1,b along with REL 110.

REL 380. Lutheran Theology & Confessional Writings. (3)
Selections from Luther‘s works, the Augsburg Confession and subsequent Lutheran writings will guide the student‘s investigation of her or his own confessional understanding of the Christian faith.
Satisfies Core Requirement F-2.

REL 481, 482. Seminar on Religious Issues. (1-3, 1-3)
Prerequisites: REL 110 or REL 111 and 112 and at least one 300 level course in Religion.
An intensive study of a question or problem in Biblical studies, religious history, or a current religious movement or issue.
This course may not be taken to complete Core requirements.

REL 491. Independent Study. (1-3)
Open only to juniors and seniors of demonstrated ability majoring or minoring in Religion and Philosophy. Subject to rules and regulations on page 64.


REL 495. Christian Vocation Internship. (3)
Prerequisites: Junior or Senior classification and approval of Religion & Philosophy Faculty advisor.
Students will be matched up with an internship opportunity which matches the student‘s expressed interest in Church Leadership. Every effort will be made to place students in an internship experience which both exhibits some of the "best practices" in their chosen field of leadership and reflects the denominational/ theological affiliations of the student intern. Subject to regulations and restrictions on page 64. Offered at departmental discretion.

REL 499. Senior Essay. (3)
A project requiring scholarly research and culminating in the public presentation of a formal paper.
Subject to rules and regulations stated in Catalog. Offered at departmental discretion.

 HUM 300. Profiles in Leadership. (2)
Students will engage in a study of the traits and theories of leadership and their usefulness in solving human problems and dilemmas. The human side of leadership will be examined through materials drawn from religion, philosophy, history, science, business, sports, biography, film and drama. This wide-ranging investigation will focus on strategies for developing effective leadership styles. This course will examine the conduct and communication of exemplary leaders in Western Society as a means of exploring the virtues and traits recognized as being the most important for successful leadership.
Offered at discretion of the Department of Religion, Philosophy, and Church Leadership.

 COL 300. Learning Leadership. (1)
Course will explore basic theories and concepts of leadership and personal values. Participants will identify personal leadership styles and skills and learn how to adapt and use them effectively in various life situations. This course is highly interactive and experiential in nature. Participants will be required to participate in many varied exercises.
Offered spring semester.

Course Descriptions